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Advantages Of Memory Care Living​

Advantages Of Memory Care Living

When someone is experiencing a memory loss condition, they may need 24-hour care and programs to promote their brain’s health.

Memory care facilities do all that and more. Their staff is dedicated to assisting residents in their daily activities and making sure they are healthy.

Security & Safety for Seniors with Memory Issues

One of the biggest concerns for seniors with memory issues is knowing that they’re safe and secure. Memory care facilities provide individuals with a secure environment that prevents wandering. Your loved one can be easily monitored in this kind of space which promotes independence and reduces confusion.

These facilities’ design prevents wandering and encourages safe outdoor activities for residents. It is dangerous for people with memory loss to walk outside unattended. It leads to becoming lost and scared.

Round-the-clock supervision means expert care is always available to them when they need it. Residents of memory care facilities can go about their lives while their families rest easy knowing they are in good hands.

Additionally, their floor plans are meant to feel like home. With spacious rooms and the ability to decorate, your loved one can feel comfortable in their new space.

An exciting social life. 

It’s not uncommon for seniors to become isolated as they get older. Isolation in seniors can lead to a host of problems, like depression, poor health, poor mobility, and more. In assisted living, residents become part of a loving, supportive community surrounded by people their own age. Residents engage in activities designed to foster social connection – from arts & crafts to social hours. Enjoying the company of peers is one of the most natural and compelling benefits of senior living.

Nutritious Meals

Malnutrition is a growing problem among older Americans, especially for seniors who have difficulty swallowing. Memory Care facilities supply nutritious meals and specialized diets that cater to their residents’ needs. They receive quality food and plenty of choices, so they can stay healthy but still be empowered to make decisions about their food.

Special Programs and Activities

Residents’ daily activities can be adapted according to their abilities and preferences. Memory care communities have specially designed programs that appeal to residents and provide them with opportunities to engage in meaningful activities. This reduces boredom and promotes stimulation in individuals who would otherwise struggle to engage. Memory care communities often build their programs around cognitive stimulation and overall wellness. According to research, keeping the mind busy can help to prevent the progression of dementia.

Helpful Programs for Behavioral Issues

People who live with Alzheimer’s care-related ailments often suffer from irritability or behavioral issues that can impede on their social lives. Memory care offers programs like leisure and therapeutic programs that focus completely on memory impairment, sundowning, mood swings, wandering and many other common behaviors exhibited by people that live with dementia. Specially trained staff can de-escalate stressful situations where a family member would be unsure of what to do. These dedicated memory care environments are the go-to resource for families who are challenged with a loved on exhibiting difficult behaviors common with the disease process.

 

Peace of mind.  

Senior living situations can be stressful for any family, whether or not the senior lives with them full-time. When a senior moves into assisted living, family members can rest assured that their loved one is safe in a supportive environment, eating well, socializing, and receiving the care they need.

Assisted living offers so many benefits to seniors and families, and we’re here to help you learn more and find the right fit for you or your loved one.

​​If you have a family member who is in need of a memory care community, we understand that you want a place where your loved one is going to feel secure and deeply cared for. 

At Braley Care, we take an individualized approach to memory care. Our staff is committed to keeping your loved one safe and as healthy as possible.

Contact us to schedule a tour of our facility and learn about all our amenities.

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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How to Spot Dementia – Signs and Symptoms to Notice

How to Spot Dementia - Signs and Symptoms to Notice

Whether you’re concerned for yourself or someone you care about, it’s important to know the warning signs of dementia so you can ensure an early diagnosis. Here are some of the most common warning signs for dementia.

Source: alzheimer.ca 

Dementia and memory loss

It’s normal to occasionally forget appointments and remember them later. A person with dementia may forget things more often or not remember them at all.

Source: betterhealth.vic.gov.au

Difficulty performing familiar tasks

Are you, or the person you know, forgetting how to do a typical routine or task, such as preparing a meal or getting dressed?

Busy people can be so distracted from time to time that they may forget to serve part of a meal, only to remember about it later. However, a person living with dementia may have trouble completing tasks that have been familiar to them all their lives, such as preparing a meal or playing a game.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Difficulties in thinking things through and planning

A person may get confused more easily and find it harder to plan, make complex decisions (for example, about finances) or solve problems.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Changes in mood

A change in mood is also common with dementia. If you have dementia, it may not be easy to recognize this in yourself, but you may notice this change in someone else. Depression, for instance, is common in the early stages of dementia.

Someone who has dementia may also seem more fearful or anxious than they were before. They could get easily upset if their usual daily routine is changed, or if they find themselves in unfamiliar situations.

Along with mood changes, you might also notice a shift in personality. One typical type of personality change seen with dementia is a shift from being shy or quiet to being outgoing.

Source: healthline.com

Apathy

Apathy, or listlessness, is a common sign in early dementia. A person with dementia may lose interest in hobbies or activities that they used to enjoy doing. They may not want to go out anymore or have fun.

They may also lose interest in spending time with friends and family, and they may seem emotionally flat.

Source: healthline.com

Impaired judgement

Are you, or the person you know, not recognizing something that can put health and safety at risk?

From time to time, people may make questionable decisions such as putting off seeing a doctor when they are not feeling well. However, a person living with dementia may experience changes in judgment or decision-making, such as not recognizing a medical problem that needs attention or wearing heavy clothing on a hot day.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Dementia and language problems

Everyone has trouble finding the right word sometimes, but a person with dementia may forget simple words or substitute inappropriate words, making sentences difficult to understand. They may also have trouble understanding others.

Source: betterhealth.vic.gov.au

Problems remembering commitments

Reoccurring memory loss is an early sign of dementia. Everyone forgets something occasionally, but if it happens regularly, be sure to document when and how often.

For example, take note if your parents regularly forget:

Dentist or doctor’s appointments

Dinner plans with friends or family

Maintenance appointments for the car

Who are you researching for?

How quickly do you need to find an option?

Source: aplaceformom.com

Losing track of time

If your elderly parent continues to forget the day, month, year, holidays, or other important dates, this is a red flag. Write down what they forget and how often the lapses occur.

Source: aplaceformom.com

Misplacing things

Are you, or the person you know, putting things in places where they shouldn’t be?

Anyone can temporarily misplace a wallet or keys. However, a person living with dementia may put things in inappropriate places. For example, an iron in the freezer, or a wristwatch in the sugar bowl.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Things to remember

The early signs of dementia are very subtle and vague and may not be immediately obvious.

Although the early signs of dementia vary, there are some common early symptoms.

If the person affected has several of the ten warning signs of dementia, consult a doctor for a complete assessment.

Your doctor may use six broad types of medical assessment to help to confirm or rule out a diagnosis of dementia.

Some people might resist going to the doctor for a medical assessment but there several strategies that can help to make this process easier.

Source: betterhealth.vic.gov.au

 

 

 

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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How to Communicate with a Late-Stage Dementia Patient​

How to Communicate with a Late-Stage Dementia Patient

The later stages of dementia

In the later stages of dementia the person is likely to have more problems with verbal communication.

They may not understand what is being said to them and are less likely to be able to respond verbally as they may have limited or no speech. They may repeat the same phrase or sound, or may only be able to repeat a couple of words. Some people may start talking lots but their words don’t seem to make sense. In this case, try to identify the feelings that the person is trying to get across and respond to these. For example, if the person is smiling and chatting happily, respond to them in the same way.

Although the person may not be able to communicate verbally, they may still be able to show their needs and emotions in other ways. Rather than speaking, they may use behavior, facial expression, gestures, and sounds to try and communicate how they are feeling and what their needs are.

Try to support the person to communicate as much as possible. It can help to observe their body language, behavior, and facial expressions. Knowing the person and how they communicate will help you both to enjoy time together. It’s important to keep communicating with the person and look for opportunities for meaningful engagement. Finding ways to engage the person’s senses can help.

When you’re thinking about how to communicate with the person, bear in mind their needs and background – including their cultural needs. For example, people from some cultural backgrounds may feel uncomfortable or distressed if you’re too close to them when you’re communicating with them.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Communication Tips: Late Stage Dementia

The quality of life for people living with dementia is largely dependent on their connection with others. Maintaining a relationship can be a complex and challenging process, especially when verbal communication is lost. During the late stage of dementia, individuals may lose the capacity for recognizable speech, although words or phrases may occasionally be uttered.

However, even if the person can no longer communicate verbally or recognize you, they likely will still be able to communicate in other ways and feel your affection and reassurance. At this stage, non-verbal communication will become increasingly important. The world is primarily perceived through the senses by people with late-stage dementia. We as caregivers can take advantage of this and use the senses to maintain a connection.

• Touch: Hold the person’s hand. Give a gentle massage to the hands, legs, or feet.

• Smell: The person may enjoy the smell of a favorite perfume, flower, or food, which may bring back happy memories.

• Vision: Videos can be relaxing, especially those with scenes of nature and soft, calming sounds.

• Hearing: Reading to the person can be comforting, even if they may not understand the words. Speak gently and with affection; your tone can help the person feel safe and relaxed. Music is a universal language that promotes well-being for most of us. Sing together or play music, especially the type of music the person has enjoyed throughout their life.

Research suggests that although someone in the late stage of Alzheimer’s has lost the ability to talk and express needs, some of the person’s core sense of self remains intact. By maintaining a meaningful connection using nonverbal communication strategies, we’re able to tap into the person’s remaining faculties and truly improve their quality of life.

Source: tenderrose.com

keep eye contact when communicating

non-verbal communication (such as gestures, facial expression, and body language) can help

smile

use appropriate physical contact (such as holding hands) to let the person know you are there and offer reassurance

don’t rush – allow plenty of time and look for non-verbal clues from the person

even if you don’t think the person can follow what you’re saying, continue talking to them clearly. They may still feel a certain way even if they don’t fully understand what you’re saying

consider responding to them in the way they respond to you (‘mirroring’ them).

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Late Stage Communication

During the late stages of Alzheimer’s disease, problems with speech and understanding language increase considerably. Individuals may repeat questions and words over and over, they may contract several words into one to form nonsense words, and may even produce unintelligible sounds without a beginning or an end. It may be very difficult for a caregiver to know if a person is hungry, needs to use the toilet, or is in pain.

Here is where close observation of body language is important. Any utterance or gesture should be viewed as an attempt to convey meaning, and caregivers need to tune in to what the person is trying to communicate.

Source: ararf.org

Back to basics

How we communicate with a person with advanced dementia can vary, depending on what we know about the individual – particularly things they have enjoyed during their life. It can be influenced by where they are receiving the care (in their own home, care home or hospital) and the relationship they have with the people providing care and support.

It sometimes helps to think about how we communicate with a baby or toddler just starting out on their life. We have to be very careful when making comparisons between older people and children. We do not want to be in the habit of treating adult citizens as if they were children in a way that would feel patronising.

From a conceptual point of view, however, if we see human development as being triggered by the brain maturing through infancy and childhood, what we see happening in dementia can be viewed as a reversal of this process.

There are some striking similarities between what babies and toddlers need from their carers or care workers and what people with advanced or end-stage dementia need from theirs. Most people who have cared for babies or toddlers find some reactions that come quite naturally.

We feel drawn to use touch, to hold, to stroke gently, to achieve eye-contact, to try to make them smile, to soothe them when they cry and to make sure they are comfortable. Over time we get to know the personality of the baby or toddler and what they are trying to communicate.

Communicating with a person with advanced dementia requires us to use these same set of skills. We need to recognise that we are caring for someone who has a long life behind them and many stored memories and experiences. If we can find a bridge into these memories we can find a way to communicate with them and nurture their spirit at this final stage of life.

Source: scie.org.uk

Keep communicating

Communication should be there until the end. Never assume that the person cannot hear or understand you. Try reminiscing about their past, talk to them about things of interest (for example, how the family are and what the grandchildren are doing). Pick up on a hobby or interest they may have had (if they enjoyed horse racing, talk about the races that day, the form of the horses, the odds and the jockeys involved).

Non-verbal communication is vital. Touch can be used to stimulate senses and provide reassurance. Try to achieve eye contact. Be aware of the tone of your voice. Remember that the expression on your face will convey more than the content of your words.

Communicating well with a person in end-stage dementia is not written about extensively. It is something that is best seen first-hand. Some years ago, communication experts Kate Allan and John Killick undertook an in-depth piece of work in Australia called the Good Sunset Project specifically to develop ways of working with people with advanced dementia. They based this on a communication approach developed in coma work and got some very positive results.

Source: scie.org.uk

 

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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The Progression and Stages of Dementia​​

The Progression and Stages of Dementia​​

What to expect as the person’s dementia progresses

Caring for someone with dementia can be a great reward but it can be challenging at times. Prepare yourself by knowing what to expect.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Making medical decisions for people with dementia

With dementia, a person’s body may continue to be physically healthy. However, dementia causes the gradual loss of thinking, remembering, and reasoning abilities, which means that people with dementia at the end of life may no longer be able to make or communicate choices about their health care. If there are no advance care planning documents in place and the family does not know the person’s wishes, caregivers may need to make difficult decisions on behalf of their loved one about care and treatment approaches.

When making health care decisions for someone with dementia, it’s important to consider the person’s quality of life. For example, medications are available that may delay or keep symptoms from getting worse for a limited time. Medications also may help control some behavioral symptoms in people with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. However, some caregivers might not want drugs prescribed for people in the later stages of these diseases if the side effects outweigh the benefits.

It is important to consider the goals of care and weigh the benefits, risks, and side effects of any treatment. You may need to make a treatment decision based on the person’s comfort rather than trying to extend their life or maintain their abilities for longer.

Source: nia.nih.gov

The progression and stages of dementia

Dementia is progressive. This means symptoms may be relatively mild at first but they get worse with time. Dementia affects everyone differently, however it can be helpful to think of dementia progressing in ‘three stages’.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Why is dementia progressive?

Dementia is not a single condition. It is caused by different physical diseases of the brain, for example Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, DLB and FTD.

In the early stage of all types of dementia only a small part of the brain is damaged. In this stage, a person has fewer symptoms as only the abilities that depend on the damaged part of the brain are affected. These early symptoms are usually relatively minor. This is why ‘mild’ dementia is used as an alternative term for the early stage.

Each type of dementia affects a different area of the brain in the early stages. This is why symptoms vary between the different types. For example, memory loss is common in early-stage Alzheimer’s but is very uncommon in early-stage FTD.

As dementia progresses into the middle and later stages, the symptoms of the different dementia types tend to become more similar. This is because more of the brain is affected as dementia progresses.

Over time, the disease causing the dementia spreads to other parts of the brain. This leads to more symptoms because more of the brain is unable to work properly. At the same time, already-damaged areas of the brain become even more affected, causing symptoms the person already has to get worse.

Eventually most parts of the brain are badly damaged by the disease. This causes major changes in all aspects of memory, thinking, language, emotions and behaviour, as well as physical problems.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

What are Specific Care Needs at Each Stage?

An individual may not require care assistance after the initial diagnosis of dementia, but that will change as the disease progresses and symptoms become worse. There are about 16 million unpaid caregivers of people with dementia in the United States. While many caregivers are providing daily help for family members, they also hire someone to help. There are many options of care assistance, such as in-home care adult day care nursing home care . There is also financial assistance Early Stage Dementia As mentioned above, in the early stage of dementia a person can function rather independently and requires little care assistance. Simple reminders of appointments and names of people may be needed. Caregivers can also assist with coping strategies to help loved ones remain as independent as possible, such as writing out a daily to-do list and a schedule for taking medications. Safety should always be considered, and if any tasks cannot be performed safely alone, supervision and assistance should be provided. During this period of dementia, it’s a good idea for caregivers and loved ones to discuss the future. For example, a long-term care plan should be made and financial and legal matters put in place.

Middle Stage Dementia In the middle stage of dementia, an individual loses some independence. Assistance with activities of daily living, such as bathing grooming, and dressing is often required. Initially, an individual may only need prompts or cues to perform these tasks, such as reminders to shower or having clothes laid out on the bed. However, at some point more hands-on assistance will be required. Establishing a routine becomes important, and caregivers need to exercise patience. Since individuals in this stage of dementia have greater difficulty communicating , caregivers need to talk slowly, clearly, and use non-verbal communication. Individuals will no longer be able to drive, so transportation will be required. It is also in this stage of dementia when it becomes unsafe to leave the individual alone, which means supervision is necessary.

Late Stage Dementia A person in this last stage of dementia requires a significant amount of care. Assistance and supervision is required 24 hours per day. Dementia patients may require assistance getting in and out of bed, moving from the bed to a chair, or may be bedridden and require help changing positions to avoid bedsores. Swallowing becomes an issue in late-stage dementia, and caregivers have to make sure food is cut into small pieces, is soft (like yogurt and applesauce), or is pureed. At some point, the individual will be 100% dependent on their caregiver and will no longer be able to complete any daily living activities alone. Not all families are equipped to offer this level of care. As mentioned previously, there are other options for care , such as hiring a part time caregiver or moving your loved one to a nursing home.

For more information on caring for individuals with dementia, click here . It’s important to remember, providing care for a loved one can be stressful, and self-care is a must.

Source: dementiacarecentral.com

Taking care of yourself

Despite your best efforts, caring for someone with dementia becomes harder as the disease moves on, and the person you are caring for becomes more dependent on you. This is a time when many family members need more support for themselves. The following tips are to help family members take care of themselves and plan for the future.

Avoid isolation and loneliness by keeping up with social activities and contact with others as much as possible.

Take care of your own health.

Join a caregiver support groupto connect with others living with the day-to-day issues of Alzheimer’s disease and facing practical challenges, grief and loss.

Watch for signs of stress and how it can affect your health and ability to provide care.

Be aware that you may already be grieving the gradual losses caused by the disease.

Seek professional help if feelings of depression or anxiety are overwhelming.

Be flexible about routines and expectations.

Try to be positive and use humour as a part of care strategies.

Make time for yourself by using respite care options, including adult day programs, professional homecare services, other family members or friends, volunteer caregivers and friendly visiting programs.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678