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Hospice Care for Those with End Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

Hospice Care for Those with End Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

Hospice Care for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

If you are reading this, it is likely you or someone you love has been waging a difficult physical and emotional battle against Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Hospice serves those in the end stages of dementia, relieving pain, controlling symptoms, improving quality of life and reducing anxiety and worry for patients and their families.

Considering the slow decline of a patient with dementia, it can be difficult to determine when the time is right for hospice. In general, hospice patients are thought to have six months or less to live. Only a doctor can make a clinical determination of life expectancy. However, look for these common signs that the disease has progressed to a point where all involved would likely benefit from hospice care for dementia:

The patient can say only a few words

The patient can no longer walk and may be bed-bound

The patient is totally dependent on others for eating, dressing and grooming

The patient shows signs of severe anxiety

Are you a healthcare provider?

Source: vitas.com

What is hospice care?

Increasingly, people are choosing hospice care at the end of life. Hospice care focuses on the care, comfort, and quality of life of a person with a serious illness who is approaching the end of life.

At some point, it may not be possible to cure a serious illness, or a patient may choose not to undergo certain treatments. Hospice is designed for this situation. The patient beginning hospice care understands that his or her illness is not responding to medical attempts to cure it or to slow the disease’s progress.

Like palliative care, hospice provides comprehensive comfort care as well as support for the family, but, in hospice, attempts to cure the person’s illness are stopped. Hospice is provided for a person with a terminal illness whose doctor believes he or she has six months or less to live if the illness runs its natural course.

It’s important for a patient to discuss hospice care options with their doctor. Sometimes, people don’t begin hospice care soon enough to take full advantage of the help it offers. Perhaps they wait too long to begin hospice and they are too close to death. Or, some people are not eligible for hospice care soon enough to receive its full benefit. Starting hospice early may be able to provide months of meaningful care and quality time with loved ones.

Source: nia.nih.gov

When is your dementia patient ready for hospice care?

Alzheimer’s disease and other progressive dementias are life-altering and eventually fatal conditions for which curative therapy is not available. Patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s are eligible for hospice care when they show all of the following characteristics:1

Unable to ambulate without assistance

Unable to dress without assistance

Unable to bathe properly

Incontinence of bowel and bladder

Unable to speak or communicate meaningfully (ability to speak is limited to approximately a half dozen or fewer intelligible and different words)

Thinking of dementia as a terminal illness from which patients will decline over a matter of years, rather than months, allows healthcare professionals to focus explicitly and aggressively on a palliative care plan.2

Source: vitas.com

Plan in Advance

The best way to get ready for the final stages of your loved one’s Alzheimer’s disease is to talk to them about their wishes as soon as possible. Ask what medical treatments they want or don’t want.

Help them fill out the legal documents that spell out their wishes, called advance directives. If they can’t understand, then use what you know about them to decide what they might prefer.

Some other important things you’ll need to do include:

Talk regularly to your loved one’s primary doctor about the outlook and timetable for their illness.

Get their will and other financial plans in order.

Decide if it would be better for your loved one to die at home or in a place like a hospital or nursing home. If you decide on home care, know that you can change your mind if it gets too hard.

Find out about hospice, palliative care, and other services available in your area and what yourinsurancewill cover.

Decide what hospice or palliative care team you’d like to care for them. If they haveMedicare, make sure the service or hospice you choose is Medicare-certified.

Decide which funeral home you’ll use and what the funeral plans will be.

Source: webmd.com

Hospice Care for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

If you are reading this, it is likely you or someone you love has been waging a difficult physical and emotional battle against Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Hospice serves those in the end stages of dementia, relieving pain, controlling symptoms, improving quality of life and reducing anxiety and worry for patients and their families.

Considering the slow decline of a patient with dementia, it can be difficult to determine when the time is right for hospice. In general, hospice patients are thought to have six months or less to live. Only a doctor can make a clinical determination of life expectancy. However, look for these common signs that the disease has progressed to a point where all involved would likely benefit from hospice care for dementia:

The patient can say only a few words

The patient can no longer walk and may be bed-bound

The patient is totally dependent on others for eating, dressing and grooming

The patient shows signs of severe anxiety

Are you a healthcare provider?

Source: vitas.com

What is hospice care?

Increasingly, people are choosing hospice care at the end of life. Hospice care focuses on the care, comfort, and quality of life of a person with a serious illness who is approaching the end of life.

At some point, it may not be possible to cure a serious illness, or a patient may choose not to undergo certain treatments. Hospice is designed for this situation. The patient beginning hospice care understands that his or her illness is not responding to medical attempts to cure it or to slow the disease’s progress.

Like palliative care, hospice provides comprehensive comfort care as well as support for the family, but, in hospice, attempts to cure the person’s illness are stopped. Hospice is provided for a person with a terminal illness whose doctor believes he or she has six months or less to live if the illness runs its natural course.

It’s important for a patient to discuss hospice care options with their doctor. Sometimes, people don’t begin hospice care soon enough to take full advantage of the help it offers. Perhaps they wait too long to begin hospice and they are too close to death. Or, some people are not eligible for hospice care soon enough to receive its full benefit. Starting hospice early may be able to provide months of meaningful care and quality time with loved ones.

Source: nia.nih.gov

When is your dementia patient ready for hospice care?

Alzheimer’s disease and other progressive dementias are life-altering and eventually fatal conditions for which curative therapy is not available. Patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s are eligible for hospice care when they show all of the following characteristics:1

Unable to ambulate without assistance

Unable to dress without assistance

Unable to bathe properly

Incontinence of bowel and bladder

Unable to speak or communicate meaningfully (ability to speak is limited to approximately a half dozen or fewer intelligible and different words)

Thinking of dementia as a terminal illness from which patients will decline over a matter of years, rather than months, allows healthcare professionals to focus explicitly and aggressively on a palliative care plan.2

Source: vitas.com

Plan in Advance

The best way to get ready for the final stages of your loved one’s Alzheimer’s disease is to talk to them about their wishes as soon as possible. Ask what medical treatments they want or don’t want.

Help them fill out the legal documents that spell out their wishes, called advance directives. If they can’t understand, then use what you know about them to decide what they might prefer.

Some other important things you’ll need to do include:

Talk regularly to your loved one’s primary doctor about the outlook and timetable for their illness.

Get their will and other financial plans in order.

Decide if it would be better for your loved one to die at home or in a place like a hospital or nursing home. If you decide on home care, know that you can change your mind if it gets too hard.

Find out about hospice, palliative care, and other services available in your area and what yourinsurancewill cover.

Decide what hospice or palliative care team you’d like to care for them. If they haveMedicare, make sure the service or hospice you choose is Medicare-certified.

Decide which funeral home you’ll use and what the funeral plans will be.

Source: webmd.com

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Normal Aging vs Early Signs of Dementia

Normal Aging vs Early Signs of Dementia

The Truth About Aging and Dementia

As we age, our brains change, but Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias are not an inevitable part of aging. In fact, up to 40% of dementia cases may be prevented or delayed. It helps to understand what’s normal and what’s not when it comes to brain health.

Normal brain aging may mean slower processing speeds and more trouble multitasking, but routine memory, skills, and knowledge are stable and may even improve with age. It’s normal to occasionally forget recent events such as where you put your keys or the name of the person you just met.

In the United States, 6.2 million people age 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease, the most common type of dementia. People with dementia have symptoms of cognitive decline that interfere with daily life—including disruptions in language, memory, attention, recognition, problem solving, and decision-making.
Source: cdc.gov

The differences between normal aging and dementia

If you are experiencing difficulties with memory, know that they may not be signs of dementia. It could be memory loss as a part of normal aging.

If you are concerned that you or someone you know has dementia, please talk to your doctor.

Source: alzheimer.ca

What is aging?

Aging is a natural process of our lives. As we age, we experience gradual changes to our brains and bodies. Some of these changes affect our physical and mental abilities, and may increase our risk of disease.

Each one of us experiences aging differently. The extent of how we experience changes due to aging, and the point in our lives when they start becoming more noticeable, varies from person to person.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), each person should have the ability to live a long and healthy life. This is considered healthy aging.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Memory, Forgetfulness, and Aging: What’s Normal and What’s Not?

Many older adults worry about their memory and other thinking abilities. For example, they might be concerned about taking longer than before to learn new things, or they may sometimes forget to pay a bill. These changes are usually signs of mild forgetfulness — often a normal part of aging — not serious memory problems.

Source: nia.nih.gov

What’s normal forgetfulness and what’s not?

What’s the difference between normal, age-related forgetfulness and a serious memory problem? It’s normal to forget things once in a while as we age, but serious memory problems make it hard to do everyday things like driving, using the phone, and finding your way home.

Talk with your doctor to determine whether memory and other cognitive problems, such as the ability to clearly think and learn, are normal and what may be causing them.

Signs that it might be time to talk to a doctor include:

Asking the same questions over and over again

Getting lost in places a person knows well

Having trouble following recipes or directions

Becoming more confused about time, people, and places

Not taking care of oneself —eating poorly, not bathing, or behaving unsafely

Source: nia.nih.gov

Normal Aging vs. Dementia

While some mild changes in cognition are considered a normal part of the aging process, . Normal age-related declines are subtle and mostly affect the speed of thinking and attentional control. In abnormal aging, declines in cognition are more severe and may include other thinking abilities, such as rapid forgetting or difficulties navigating, solving common problems, expressing oneself in conversation or behaving outside of social rules. Abnormal aging can also include the motor system resulting in excessive tripping, falls or tremor. Often it is difficult to determine exactly when a person should be concerned with cognitive changes they may be experiencing. Symptoms vary from person to person – what is normal for one person may not be normal for another. This contributes to the challenges clinicians face when determining whether what someone is experiencing is a significant dementia or not.

Source: memory.ucsf.edu

When Forgetfulness Is a Problem

If memory loss makes it hard for you to handle your daily tasks, that’s a sign you shouldn’t ignore. Are you forgetting things you only just heard? Asking the same question over and over again? Relying on lots of paper or electronic reminders just to get through the day? Talk to your doctor if you or your family notices that happening to you.

 

Source: webmd.com

Signs of Dementia

Sometimes, there does come a point at which forgetfulness becomes more prominent and affects daily life. These symptoms can point to dementia. Some signs of a more serious problem, such as dementia, include:

Not being able to remember a recent conversation or event, or forgetting what’s happening while it’s happening

Being unable to learn or remember new information

Having significant language issues, such as struggling to have a conversation because of word-finding problems

Experiencing significant mood or personality changes such as depression, anxiety, or intense irritability

Appearing apathetic or withdrawn

Frequently pausing when talking

Forgetting family members’ names

Often getting lost and needing help finding one’s way

Experiencing significant declines in reaction time, which may affect driving, cooking, or the ability to recover from tripping and falling

The key to understanding what is normal aging and what could be dementia is evaluating how it affects daily life. For example, if your loved one is anxious because they can no longer manage their checkbook or monthly bills, you should speak with a physician.

Are you caring for someone with dementia? The Caregiver’s Complete Guide to Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care includes tips to help you accommodate your loved one’s changing needs.

Source: arborcompany.com

The different levels of memory loss

Age-associated memory impairment

If you are experiencing difficulties with memory, but:

They are not noticeably disrupting your daily life,

They are not affecting your ability to complete tasks as you usually would,

You have no difficulty learning and remembering new things and

There’s no underlying medical condition that is causing your memory problems,

Then you have what’s known as age-associated memory impairment.

Age-associated memory impairment is considered to be a normal part of aging. It doesn’t mean you have dementia.

Though you may have difficulties remembering things on occasion, like where you left your keys, a password for a website or the name of a former classmate, these are not signs you have dementia. You may not remember things as quickly as you used to, but most of the time there is no cause for concern.

Source: alzheimer.ca

When to visit the doctor for memory loss

If you, a family member, or friend has problems remembering recent events or thinking clearly, talk with a doctor. He or she may suggest a thorough checkup to see what might be causing the symptoms. You may also wish to talk with your doctor about opportunities to participate in research on cognitive health and aging.

At your doctor visit, he or she can perform tests and assessments, which may include a brain scan, to help determine the source of memory problems. Your doctor may also recommend you see a neurologist, a doctor who specializes in treating diseases of the brain and nervous system.

Memory and other thinking problems have many possible causes, including depression, an infection, or medication side effects. Sometimes, the problem can be treated, and cognition improves. Other times, the problem is a brain disorder, such as Alzheimer’s disease, which cannot be reversed.

Finding the cause of the problems is important for determining the best course of action. Once you know the cause, you can make the right treatment plan. People with memory problems should make a follow-up appointment to check their memory every six to 12 months. They can ask a family member, friend, or the doctor’s office to remind them if they’re worried they’ll forget.

Learn more about cognitive health and Alzheimer’s and related dementias.

 

Source: nia.nih.gov

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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How Does Dementia Affect Communication

How does dementia affect communication? 

How does dementia affect communication? 

As human beings, we communicate with each other using an array of verbal and non-verbal communication. From our facial expressions and body language to the words we speak and tone we use, these are the tools we often take for granted to help us express ourselves and feel understood.

All forms of dementia can affect communication in all kinds of different ways. Although this can be challenging and sometimes frustrating or distressing – there are ways that you can help to support and maintain communication.

Source: liftedcare.com

Why is communication important?

Communication is a vital part of our lives. It allows us to express who we are and relate to one another. Communication is more than talking and listening – it involves understanding and interpreting.

When a person living with dementia is having trouble expressing themselves or understanding what is being communicated, try these tips to help you stay connected.

 

Source: alzheimer.ca

Communicating well with a person with dementia

How does dementia affect communication?

Dementia can make it more difficult to communicate with others. As dementia progresses it becomes harder for a person to tell others about themselves and to understand what others are saying to them. This leads to people feeling cut off and isolated.

Source: scie.org.uk

Behavior as communication

At this stage, behaviors are often the only way to communicate what is on the person’s mind. These are called dementia-related behaviors. They are messages about ideas, feelings, and needs, and he is telling you in the best way he can the only way he can.

For instance, a caregiver who provides personal care (bathing, toileting) too quickly causes frustration for the person living with dementia; he can’t process what is happening. Frustration can turn to resistance, anger, and even aggression, all of which may be avoided if the caregiver understands the needs of the person in his or her care, which in the case of this example is simply to move slower and with greater care.

Source: hopehospice.com

How to approach communication with people living with dementia

Believe that communication is possible at all stages of dementia:

What a person says or does and how a person behaves has meaning.

Never lose sight of the person and what they are trying to tell you.

The key to positive conversations with people living with dementia isrespectful, sensitive and consistent communication.

Difficulties with communication can be discouraging for the person living with dementia and families, so consider creative ways to understand and connect with each other. In the video below, listen to what other caregivers have to say about caring for and communicating with people living with dementia.

The strategies discussed in the video above, as well as the tips listed below, are successful because they are based on a person-centred philosophy that views people living with dementia first and foremost as individuals, with unique attributes, personal values and history.

We also recommend learning as much as you can about dementia, its progression and how it can change the abilities of a person. As abilities change, you can learn to interpret the person’s messages by paying attention to both verbal and non-verbal cues.

Source: alzheimer.ca

The right environment

When communicating with a person with dementia, try to:

avoid competing noises, such as TV or radio

stay still while you are talking – this makes it easier for the person with dementia to follow what you are saying

maintain regular routines – this helps to minimise confusion and can assist communication

keep a consistent approach – it is much less confusing for the person with dementia if everyone uses the same style of communication. Repeating the message in exactly the same way is important for all the family and carers.

Source: betterhealth.vic.gov.au

 

Listening to and understanding someone with dementia

Communication is a two-way process. As a carer of someone with dementia, you will probably have to learn to listen more carefully.

You may need to be more aware of non-verbal messages, such as facial expressions and body language. You may have to use more physical contact, such as reassuring pats on the arm, or smile as well as speaking.

Active listening can help:

use eye contact to look at the person, and encourage them to look at you when either of you are talking

try not to interrupt them, even if you think you know what they’re saying

stop what you’re doing so you can give the person your full attention while they speak

minimise distractions that may get in the way of communication, such as the television or the radio playing too loudly, but always check if it’s OK to do so

repeat what you heard back to the person and ask if it’s accurate, or ask them to repeat what they said

Source: nhs.uk

Will communication get harder?

As time goes on, communication will likely become more difficult for someone with dementia. Although dementia can take years to advance over several stages, symptoms can worsen in each subsequent stage.

Source: liftedcare.com

The silver lining

As with much of life, there is a silver lining to the reality of dementia-related language decline. The brain’s temporal lobe is two-sided. The left side deteriorates while the right side remains intact, often to the end of the dementia journey. The right side enables a person to engage in basic social chit-chat, clap or toe-tap to the rhythm of music and poetry, and even dance.

A person living with dementia can find great comfort and joy in listening to his favorite music or singing along to songs from his past. It’s not uncommon for a person to retain the ability to recite favorite scriptures or poems, even word for word. This can happen even in persons who are otherwise non-verbal.

Care partners can learn new ways to interact with their loved ones who have dementia by engaging in activities that rely on the right side of the temporal lobe.

Source: hopehospice.com

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Tips for Seniors to Maintain Good Health​

Tips for Seniors to Maintain Good Health​

Staying healthy is important at any age, but for seniors, it is even more important for living a long, happy, and active life. Here are tips to help maintain good health as you age.

Source: bannerhealth.com

Get active

Physical activity is an immune system booster. The more you move, the more your body is able to fight inflammation and infections.

The activity you partake in doesn’t have to be strenuous. Low impact exercises are effective, too.

You might consider biking, walking, swimming, or low impact aerobics. If you’re able to, engage in moderate intensity exercise for about 20 to 30 minutes a day to reach the recommended total of 150 minutes a weekTrusted Source

Modify your exercise routine to find what feels best for you.

Source: healthline.com

Eat healthy

Maintaining a healthy diet as you age is essential for living well . The digestive system slows down with age, so it becomes necessary to incorporate important vitamins and high-fiber foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains into your loved one’s diet. Not only does adding fiber help seniors with maintaining a healthy diet, but it also can lower the risk of major health problems like stroke and heart disease.

Another health secret for seniors is to stay hydrated. Because they tend to generally feel less thirsty as they age, seniors are prone to dehydration . Make sure your loved one drinks plenty of water to stay energized and to avoid constipation and urinary tract infections.

Lack of appetite is a common cause of poor senior nutrition. It’s important to first address the causes of appetite decline in older people , according to research from the National Institute of Health Research. There can be many causes, but researchers concluded that simply improving the “mealtime ambiance” and “enhancing the flavor of food” can work wonders for a senior’s appetite.

Along with trying these tips to stimulate appetite in the elderly , you can really help support healthy eating habits by:

Encouraging shared mealtimes with friends and family

Offering visually appealing food

Suggesting a regular schedule for meals, snacks, and drinks

Source: aplaceformom.com

Maintain strong bones

Most of us really don’t think about our bones until one breaks. However, bone health, like other aspects of your health, needs to be worked on for years. The good news is that it’s never too late to take care of your bones and slow bone loss. 

Want to know more about your risk for osteoporosis? Talk to your doctor about a DEXA bone density scan. It is a common screening test for women over 65 and can help predict your risk of fractures or osteoporosis.

Source: bannerhealth.com

Get plenty of rest

Not only can sleep reduce your stress level, but sleep is how your body repairs itself. For this reason, getting an adequate amount of sleep can result in a stronger immune system, making it easier for your body to fight off viruses.

Sleep is also important as you get older because it can improve memory and concentration. Aim for at least seven and a half to nine hours of sleep per night.

If you have trouble sleeping, talk to your doctor to find the underlying cause. Causes of insomnia can include inactivity during the day and too much caffeine. Or it can be a sign of a medical condition like sleep apnea or restless leg syndrome.

Source: healthline.com

Keep medications organized and safe

Especially as we age, you might need to take different medications to manage different health conditions. It’s important to review your medications regularly with your pharmacist and your health care provider to make sure everything is necessary and to identify possible interactions.

Learn more about safely managing your medications:

The Top Warning Signs You Might Be Taking Too Many Medications

The Importance of Taking Your Medications as Prescribed

Why You Should Never Throw Away That Medication Package Insert

Do you have diabetes? Managing your medications and insulin can present some unique challenges. Here are “6 Medication Safety Tips for Older Adults with Diabetes”.

Source: bannerhealth.com

Remember cognitive health

Staying mentally active and learning new skills may even lead to improved thinking ability , according to the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health. Seniors should keep their minds sharp through various brain games and other engaging activities: Completing crossword puzzles, reading, writing, and trying new hobbies can stimulate seniors’ minds and help them engage with their surrounding environment to ward off cognitive decline.

Source: aplaceformom.com

Visit the dentist every 6 months

The risk for cavities goes up with age. Furthermore, oral health is directly related to overall health : Many mouth infections can be linked to serious health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The American Dental Association outlines the various concerns seniors over 60 should have regarding their oral health . Lastly, in addition to brushing and flossing daily, seniors should regularly see their local dentist to maintain healthy teeth and gums.

Source: aplaceformom.com

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Managing Difficult Dementia Behaviors

Managing Difficult Dementia Behaviors

Dementia often causes difficult behaviors in those we love due to confusion or memory issues. Your loved one may also become more easily agitated, have mood swings, wander, try to manipulate the situation, or show poor judgment. These dementia behaviors—and several others—are normal. But, for caregivers, they create unique challenges. While you can’t take these behaviors away, you can use tools to manage them. 

Agitation is the most common reason Americans place loved ones with dementia in nursing homes. There are more than 5 million Americans with dementia,1 and 80% of them may develop behavioral symptoms such as aggression, hallucinations, or delusions at some point..

As the geriatric population grows, health care practitioners will increasingly encounter distressed caregivers of dementia patients asking for help in handling difficult behaviors. Though most agitation is probably a result of deteriorative changes, health care professionals can influence behaviors.

Here are ways to manage difficult dementia behaviors:

REASSURE the person. Put the person with dementia’s feelings first. He or she cannot change; YOU have to change, or you have to change the immediate environment.

Collect yourself (no matter how irritated you are). People with dementia are sensitive to others’ moods and will pick yours up and mirror it. So take a deep breath. Count to 3. Or do a silent scream in the bathroom. Remind yourself, “It’s not him/her. It’s the dementia!” 

Avoid making the mistake of assuming they’ll forget your angry moment. Although it’s true that people with dementia tend to quickly forget what was said, the emotional impact of an encounter (negative OR positive) lasts much longer! 

Do: 

Approach slowly and from the front. You’re less apt to startle, confuse, or provoke. 

Play back the person’s emotions and ask questions: “You sound upset.” “You look sad. Can I help?” “I know this bothers you. Let’s see what I can do.” 

Try developing a go-to mantra for soothing: “I’m here.” “Everything’s OK.” “Not to worry, love.” 

Make your body language match your words. Avoid sighing or rolling your eyes. Smile, nod, use a friendly tone, relax your posture. Unspoken factors convey more than half of any message. Try touching an arm or shoulder. 

Don’t: 

Say things like “Calm down!” This has the opposite effect — it raises anxiety. 

Ask, “What’s wrong?” When someone doesn’t know or can’t answer, it’s irritating. 

Try to reason with the person (no matter how tempting). Logic and argument will not work. Period.

Things to Keep in Mind When Dealing With Difficult Behaviors

What’s not okay? People with Alzheimer’s or dementia often exhibit behaviors that are unpredictable and may be outside the bounds of what others consider “normal” or socially acceptable. It may be tough to know when to worry and when to be flexible.

In general, try to remember that these behaviors do not define the person, they are just a product of the disease. If your loved one had the ability, they would probably choose to act differently.

Also, remember to practice patience and forgiveness. The disease, not the person, is likely causing these things to occur. Try to let things go and avoid holding a grudge over something they may not have meant to do or say, or even remember doing. The exception is if your loved one becomes a physical danger to themselves or others. Physically abusive behavior is not okay. Even a one-time occurrence should be communicated to your physician or other healthcare or mental health provider immediately to ensure your loved one’s safety as well as your own.

Finally, there are so many more behavior interventions, treatments and specialty care providers now than ever before. Don’t be afraid to reach out.

Wandering – How to Manage Wandering & Roaming

A stressful or over-stimulating environment can cause an individual with dementia to leave home or place of care without anyone noticing.

Stress can trigger disorientation and fear which may prompt a wandering episode.

Below are our strategies for management of dementia-induced wandering behavior:

  • Reduce noise in the home, including loud TVs, computers, or exhaust fans can prevent increased levels of stress and anxiety.
  • If they are able, encourage your loved one to engage in physical activity – exercise, dancing, or movement games – to reduce restlessness and promote restful sleep.
  • If your loved one begins pacing or appears distressed, offer reassurance he or she is secure and in a safe place.
  • Remove items commonly taken when leaving the home, such as keys, wallets, jewelry, and purses.
  • Talk to the doctor about pain treatment options. A dementia patient may be wandering in an attempt to escape pain and discomfort.

About Dementia & Wandering Behavior

As dementia progresses, it can be difficult for your loved one to remember major environmental and life changes.

They may mistakenly engage in old routines, such as leaving the house to go to work at a job they have long since retired from or to visit a store no longer in business.

In addition, wandering can be caused by pain and discomfort, a lack of physical activity or simply by searching for locations related to normal, daily activities, such as the bathroom or kitchen.

Considering the rapid rise in the rate of dementia and the toll it takes on individuals, families, caregivers and healthcare systems, it’s not surprising that experts are intent on exploring and testing new treatments and therapies. Non-drug approaches not only avoid the side effects of medication, there is increasing evidence that they help reduce challenging behaviours associated with dementia, making life a bit easier for people with dementia and their caregivers.

Change with Your Loved One

Every person’s progression with dementia is different. You may have to try several tactics or change your approach as your loved one changes. Keep a journal of behaviors to help you track triggers and resolutions. This may help you see the bigger picture and know when it’s time to adjust.

Sources:
https://walnutplacelcs.com/
https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/
https://betterhealthwhileaging.net/
https://www.todaysgeriatricmedicine.com/
https://crhcf.org/
https://www.alzheimers.net/
https://salmonhealth.com/
https://www.mcmasteroptimalaging.org/

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Daily Activities For A Loved One With Alzheimer’s​

Daily Activities For A Loved One With Alzheimer's

Doing things we enjoy gives us pleasure and adds meaning to our lives. People with Alzheimer’s disease need to be active and do things they enjoy. However, it’s not easy for them to plan their days and do different tasks.

 

People with Alzheimer’s may have trouble deciding what to do each day, which could make them fearful and worried or quiet and withdrawn, or they may have trouble starting tasks. Remember, the person is not being lazy. He or she might need help organizing the day or doing an activity.

 

Keep a Routine

Planning daily activities doesn’t come easily to people with Alzheimer’s. They also tend to prefer familiar habits, places, and tasks.

But daily routines help them focus on activities they find meaningful. If they know what to expect, it can also lessen frustration and improve their mood.

When you plan a daily routine for the person you care for, think about:

  • Their likes and dislikes
  • How they used to spend their days
  • Times of day they feel freshest: Things like bathing or going to a doctor’s appointment are easier when your loved one feels rested.
  • Regular times for waking up and going to sleep: Don’t let them nap several times during the day, or for long periods. This could disrupt their sense of day and night.

Place familiar objects around the house, such as family photos and mementos. These can make them feel more secure and connected.

Familiar smells and pastimes are also comforting. A favorite dessert and a TV show can be a pleasure for someone who always enjoyed those things after dinner or started their day that way, even if they can’t totally understand the show’s plot.

Pets

Here’s a source of unconditional love. Pets convey their needs in ways that everyone, including people with Alzheimer’s, easily understands, and they provide comfort. Relax by watching birds from a window or fish in an aquarium.

Encourage visual expression
Painting and drawing are ways to express feelings safely and with creativity. Encourage using bold, bright colors on big surfaces. Rolls of butcher paper enable seniors with dementia to create without encountering the stress of defined spaces.


Watch old movies and TV shows
Did your aging parent grow up watching westerns like “Gunsmoke” or “My Darling Clementine”? Did they prefer musicals like “The King and I” or “Singing in the Rain”? You can find old favorites at your local library or streaming online. Add some movie snacks for a fun family activity!

Building and creating art
Building and creating art can be quite stimulating. Consider embroidery, painting, and even paper mache or wood projects. Physical activities like kneading clay, scrubbing, or sanding help the mind focus and has easily become a favorite of all the residents at Shaker Place.

 

Household chores 

Work in tandem while washing dishes, setting the table, sweeping, dusting, sorting laundry, clipping coupons and recycling. Working together as a team can be helpful to caregivers by taking one more task off their shoulders, while the routine of these everyday chores can be useful for the patient.

Exercise 

This can mean different things for different people. Depending on skill level and physical limitations, exercise can mean anything from taking a walk together to using a stationary bike, using stretch bands or watching exercise videos geared towards the appropriate audience.

 

Going out 

If you are a caregiver, try to make plans for outings during a time of day when your loved one is at his/her best temperament and also keep the outing short. Potential outings could include dining at a favorite restaurant, visiting a museum or taking a stroll through a park or shopping mall.

 

Things to remember

  • Participating in suitable activities can help a person with dementia to achieve purpose and pleasure.
  • Activities play a significant part in dealing with challenging behaviours.
  • There are many ways to plan and provide appropriate activities for people with dementia.
  • Understanding what makes the person unique can help you plan suitable activities for them.
  • Always talk to the person’s doctor before starting on any new exercise program.
  • A physiotherapist can design an exercise program that takes the person’s current health and abilities into account.

Sources:
https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/

https://www.shakerplace.org/

https://www.nia.nih.gov/

https://www.webmd.com/

https://assets.aarp.org/

https://www.aplaceformom.com/

https://www.whereyoulivematters.org/

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Advantages Of Memory Care Living​

Advantages Of Memory Care Living

When someone is experiencing a memory loss condition, they may need 24-hour care and programs to promote their brain’s health.

Memory care facilities do all that and more. Their staff is dedicated to assisting residents in their daily activities and making sure they are healthy.

Security & Safety for Seniors with Memory Issues

One of the biggest concerns for seniors with memory issues is knowing that they’re safe and secure. Memory care facilities provide individuals with a secure environment that prevents wandering. Your loved one can be easily monitored in this kind of space which promotes independence and reduces confusion.

These facilities’ design prevents wandering and encourages safe outdoor activities for residents. It is dangerous for people with memory loss to walk outside unattended. It leads to becoming lost and scared.

Round-the-clock supervision means expert care is always available to them when they need it. Residents of memory care facilities can go about their lives while their families rest easy knowing they are in good hands.

Additionally, their floor plans are meant to feel like home. With spacious rooms and the ability to decorate, your loved one can feel comfortable in their new space.

An exciting social life. 

It’s not uncommon for seniors to become isolated as they get older. Isolation in seniors can lead to a host of problems, like depression, poor health, poor mobility, and more. In assisted living, residents become part of a loving, supportive community surrounded by people their own age. Residents engage in activities designed to foster social connection – from arts & crafts to social hours. Enjoying the company of peers is one of the most natural and compelling benefits of senior living.

Nutritious Meals

Malnutrition is a growing problem among older Americans, especially for seniors who have difficulty swallowing. Memory Care facilities supply nutritious meals and specialized diets that cater to their residents’ needs. They receive quality food and plenty of choices, so they can stay healthy but still be empowered to make decisions about their food.

Special Programs and Activities

Residents’ daily activities can be adapted according to their abilities and preferences. Memory care communities have specially designed programs that appeal to residents and provide them with opportunities to engage in meaningful activities. This reduces boredom and promotes stimulation in individuals who would otherwise struggle to engage. Memory care communities often build their programs around cognitive stimulation and overall wellness. According to research, keeping the mind busy can help to prevent the progression of dementia.

Helpful Programs for Behavioral Issues

People who live with Alzheimer’s care-related ailments often suffer from irritability or behavioral issues that can impede on their social lives. Memory care offers programs like leisure and therapeutic programs that focus completely on memory impairment, sundowning, mood swings, wandering and many other common behaviors exhibited by people that live with dementia. Specially trained staff can de-escalate stressful situations where a family member would be unsure of what to do. These dedicated memory care environments are the go-to resource for families who are challenged with a loved on exhibiting difficult behaviors common with the disease process.

 

Peace of mind.  

Senior living situations can be stressful for any family, whether or not the senior lives with them full-time. When a senior moves into assisted living, family members can rest assured that their loved one is safe in a supportive environment, eating well, socializing, and receiving the care they need.

Assisted living offers so many benefits to seniors and families, and we’re here to help you learn more and find the right fit for you or your loved one.

If you have a family member who is in need of a memory care community, we understand that you want a place where your loved one is going to feel secure and deeply cared for. 

At Braley Care, we take an individualized approach to memory care. Our staff is committed to keeping your loved one safe and as healthy as possible.

Contact us to schedule a tour of our facility and learn about all our amenities.

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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How to Spot Dementia – Signs and Symptoms to Notice

How to Spot Dementia - Signs and Symptoms to Notice

Whether you’re concerned for yourself or someone you care about, it’s important to know the warning signs of dementia so you can ensure an early diagnosis. Here are some of the most common warning signs for dementia.

Source: alzheimer.ca 

Dementia and memory loss

It’s normal to occasionally forget appointments and remember them later. A person with dementia may forget things more often or not remember them at all.

Source: betterhealth.vic.gov.au

Difficulty performing familiar tasks

Are you, or the person you know, forgetting how to do a typical routine or task, such as preparing a meal or getting dressed?

Busy people can be so distracted from time to time that they may forget to serve part of a meal, only to remember about it later. However, a person living with dementia may have trouble completing tasks that have been familiar to them all their lives, such as preparing a meal or playing a game.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Difficulties in thinking things through and planning

A person may get confused more easily and find it harder to plan, make complex decisions (for example, about finances) or solve problems.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Changes in mood

A change in mood is also common with dementia. If you have dementia, it may not be easy to recognize this in yourself, but you may notice this change in someone else. Depression, for instance, is common in the early stages of dementia.

Someone who has dementia may also seem more fearful or anxious than they were before. They could get easily upset if their usual daily routine is changed, or if they find themselves in unfamiliar situations.

Along with mood changes, you might also notice a shift in personality. One typical type of personality change seen with dementia is a shift from being shy or quiet to being outgoing.

Source: healthline.com

Apathy

Apathy, or listlessness, is a common sign in early dementia. A person with dementia may lose interest in hobbies or activities that they used to enjoy doing. They may not want to go out anymore or have fun.

They may also lose interest in spending time with friends and family, and they may seem emotionally flat.

Source: healthline.com

Impaired judgement

Are you, or the person you know, not recognizing something that can put health and safety at risk?

From time to time, people may make questionable decisions such as putting off seeing a doctor when they are not feeling well. However, a person living with dementia may experience changes in judgment or decision-making, such as not recognizing a medical problem that needs attention or wearing heavy clothing on a hot day.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Dementia and language problems

Everyone has trouble finding the right word sometimes, but a person with dementia may forget simple words or substitute inappropriate words, making sentences difficult to understand. They may also have trouble understanding others.

Source: betterhealth.vic.gov.au

Problems remembering commitments

Reoccurring memory loss is an early sign of dementia. Everyone forgets something occasionally, but if it happens regularly, be sure to document when and how often.

For example, take note if your parents regularly forget:

Dentist or doctor’s appointments

Dinner plans with friends or family

Maintenance appointments for the car

Who are you researching for?

How quickly do you need to find an option?

Source: aplaceformom.com

Losing track of time

If your elderly parent continues to forget the day, month, year, holidays, or other important dates, this is a red flag. Write down what they forget and how often the lapses occur.

Source: aplaceformom.com

Misplacing things

Are you, or the person you know, putting things in places where they shouldn’t be?

Anyone can temporarily misplace a wallet or keys. However, a person living with dementia may put things in inappropriate places. For example, an iron in the freezer, or a wristwatch in the sugar bowl.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Things to remember

The early signs of dementia are very subtle and vague and may not be immediately obvious.

Although the early signs of dementia vary, there are some common early symptoms.

If the person affected has several of the ten warning signs of dementia, consult a doctor for a complete assessment.

Your doctor may use six broad types of medical assessment to help to confirm or rule out a diagnosis of dementia.

Some people might resist going to the doctor for a medical assessment but there several strategies that can help to make this process easier.

Source: betterhealth.vic.gov.au

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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How to Communicate with a Late-Stage Dementia Patient​

How to Communicate with a Late-Stage Dementia Patient

The later stages of dementia

In the later stages of dementia the person is likely to have more problems with verbal communication.

They may not understand what is being said to them and are less likely to be able to respond verbally as they may have limited or no speech. They may repeat the same phrase or sound, or may only be able to repeat a couple of words. Some people may start talking lots but their words don’t seem to make sense. In this case, try to identify the feelings that the person is trying to get across and respond to these. For example, if the person is smiling and chatting happily, respond to them in the same way.

Although the person may not be able to communicate verbally, they may still be able to show their needs and emotions in other ways. Rather than speaking, they may use behavior, facial expression, gestures, and sounds to try and communicate how they are feeling and what their needs are.

Try to support the person to communicate as much as possible. It can help to observe their body language, behavior, and facial expressions. Knowing the person and how they communicate will help you both to enjoy time together. It’s important to keep communicating with the person and look for opportunities for meaningful engagement. Finding ways to engage the person’s senses can help.

When you’re thinking about how to communicate with the person, bear in mind their needs and background – including their cultural needs. For example, people from some cultural backgrounds may feel uncomfortable or distressed if you’re too close to them when you’re communicating with them.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Communication Tips: Late Stage Dementia

The quality of life for people living with dementia is largely dependent on their connection with others. Maintaining a relationship can be a complex and challenging process, especially when verbal communication is lost. During the late stage of dementia, individuals may lose the capacity for recognizable speech, although words or phrases may occasionally be uttered.

However, even if the person can no longer communicate verbally or recognize you, they likely will still be able to communicate in other ways and feel your affection and reassurance. At this stage, non-verbal communication will become increasingly important. The world is primarily perceived through the senses by people with late-stage dementia. We as caregivers can take advantage of this and use the senses to maintain a connection.

• Touch: Hold the person’s hand. Give a gentle massage to the hands, legs, or feet.

• Smell: The person may enjoy the smell of a favorite perfume, flower, or food, which may bring back happy memories.

• Vision: Videos can be relaxing, especially those with scenes of nature and soft, calming sounds.

• Hearing: Reading to the person can be comforting, even if they may not understand the words. Speak gently and with affection; your tone can help the person feel safe and relaxed. Music is a universal language that promotes well-being for most of us. Sing together or play music, especially the type of music the person has enjoyed throughout their life.

Research suggests that although someone in the late stage of Alzheimer’s has lost the ability to talk and express needs, some of the person’s core sense of self remains intact. By maintaining a meaningful connection using nonverbal communication strategies, we’re able to tap into the person’s remaining faculties and truly improve their quality of life.

Source: tenderrose.com

keep eye contact when communicating

non-verbal communication (such as gestures, facial expression, and body language) can help

smile

use appropriate physical contact (such as holding hands) to let the person know you are there and offer reassurance

don’t rush – allow plenty of time and look for non-verbal clues from the person

even if you don’t think the person can follow what you’re saying, continue talking to them clearly. They may still feel a certain way even if they don’t fully understand what you’re saying

consider responding to them in the way they respond to you (‘mirroring’ them).

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Late Stage Communication

During the late stages of Alzheimer’s disease, problems with speech and understanding language increase considerably. Individuals may repeat questions and words over and over, they may contract several words into one to form nonsense words, and may even produce unintelligible sounds without a beginning or an end. It may be very difficult for a caregiver to know if a person is hungry, needs to use the toilet, or is in pain.

Here is where close observation of body language is important. Any utterance or gesture should be viewed as an attempt to convey meaning, and caregivers need to tune in to what the person is trying to communicate.

Source: ararf.org

Back to basics

How we communicate with a person with advanced dementia can vary, depending on what we know about the individual – particularly things they have enjoyed during their life. It can be influenced by where they are receiving the care (in their own home, care home or hospital) and the relationship they have with the people providing care and support.

It sometimes helps to think about how we communicate with a baby or toddler just starting out on their life. We have to be very careful when making comparisons between older people and children. We do not want to be in the habit of treating adult citizens as if they were children in a way that would feel patronising.

From a conceptual point of view, however, if we see human development as being triggered by the brain maturing through infancy and childhood, what we see happening in dementia can be viewed as a reversal of this process.

There are some striking similarities between what babies and toddlers need from their carers or care workers and what people with advanced or end-stage dementia need from theirs. Most people who have cared for babies or toddlers find some reactions that come quite naturally.

We feel drawn to use touch, to hold, to stroke gently, to achieve eye-contact, to try to make them smile, to soothe them when they cry and to make sure they are comfortable. Over time we get to know the personality of the baby or toddler and what they are trying to communicate.

Communicating with a person with advanced dementia requires us to use these same set of skills. We need to recognise that we are caring for someone who has a long life behind them and many stored memories and experiences. If we can find a bridge into these memories we can find a way to communicate with them and nurture their spirit at this final stage of life.

Source: scie.org.uk

Keep communicating

Communication should be there until the end. Never assume that the person cannot hear or understand you. Try reminiscing about their past, talk to them about things of interest (for example, how the family are and what the grandchildren are doing). Pick up on a hobby or interest they may have had (if they enjoyed horse racing, talk about the races that day, the form of the horses, the odds and the jockeys involved).

Non-verbal communication is vital. Touch can be used to stimulate senses and provide reassurance. Try to achieve eye contact. Be aware of the tone of your voice. Remember that the expression on your face will convey more than the content of your words.

Communicating well with a person in end-stage dementia is not written about extensively. It is something that is best seen first-hand. Some years ago, communication experts Kate Allan and John Killick undertook an in-depth piece of work in Australia called the Good Sunset Project specifically to develop ways of working with people with advanced dementia. They based this on a communication approach developed in coma work and got some very positive results.

Source: scie.org.uk

 

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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The Progression and Stages of Dementia​​

The Progression and Stages of Dementia​​

What to expect as the person’s dementia progresses

Caring for someone with dementia can be a great reward but it can be challenging at times. Prepare yourself by knowing what to expect.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Making medical decisions for people with dementia

With dementia, a person’s body may continue to be physically healthy. However, dementia causes the gradual loss of thinking, remembering, and reasoning abilities, which means that people with dementia at the end of life may no longer be able to make or communicate choices about their health care. If there are no advance care planning documents in place and the family does not know the person’s wishes, caregivers may need to make difficult decisions on behalf of their loved one about care and treatment approaches.

When making health care decisions for someone with dementia, it’s important to consider the person’s quality of life. For example, medications are available that may delay or keep symptoms from getting worse for a limited time. Medications also may help control some behavioral symptoms in people with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. However, some caregivers might not want drugs prescribed for people in the later stages of these diseases if the side effects outweigh the benefits.

It is important to consider the goals of care and weigh the benefits, risks, and side effects of any treatment. You may need to make a treatment decision based on the person’s comfort rather than trying to extend their life or maintain their abilities for longer.

Source: nia.nih.gov

The progression and stages of dementia

Dementia is progressive. This means symptoms may be relatively mild at first but they get worse with time. Dementia affects everyone differently, however it can be helpful to think of dementia progressing in ‘three stages’.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Why is dementia progressive?

Dementia is not a single condition. It is caused by different physical diseases of the brain, for example Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, DLB and FTD.

In the early stage of all types of dementia only a small part of the brain is damaged. In this stage, a person has fewer symptoms as only the abilities that depend on the damaged part of the brain are affected. These early symptoms are usually relatively minor. This is why ‘mild’ dementia is used as an alternative term for the early stage.

Each type of dementia affects a different area of the brain in the early stages. This is why symptoms vary between the different types. For example, memory loss is common in early-stage Alzheimer’s but is very uncommon in early-stage FTD.

As dementia progresses into the middle and later stages, the symptoms of the different dementia types tend to become more similar. This is because more of the brain is affected as dementia progresses.

Over time, the disease causing the dementia spreads to other parts of the brain. This leads to more symptoms because more of the brain is unable to work properly. At the same time, already-damaged areas of the brain become even more affected, causing symptoms the person already has to get worse.

Eventually most parts of the brain are badly damaged by the disease. This causes major changes in all aspects of memory, thinking, language, emotions and behaviour, as well as physical problems.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

What are Specific Care Needs at Each Stage?

An individual may not require care assistance after the initial diagnosis of dementia, but that will change as the disease progresses and symptoms become worse. There are about 16 million unpaid caregivers of people with dementia in the United States. While many caregivers are providing daily help for family members, they also hire someone to help. There are many options of care assistance, such as in-home care adult day care nursing home care . There is also financial assistance Early Stage Dementia As mentioned above, in the early stage of dementia a person can function rather independently and requires little care assistance. Simple reminders of appointments and names of people may be needed. Caregivers can also assist with coping strategies to help loved ones remain as independent as possible, such as writing out a daily to-do list and a schedule for taking medications. Safety should always be considered, and if any tasks cannot be performed safely alone, supervision and assistance should be provided. During this period of dementia, it’s a good idea for caregivers and loved ones to discuss the future. For example, a long-term care plan should be made and financial and legal matters put in place.

Middle Stage Dementia In the middle stage of dementia, an individual loses some independence. Assistance with activities of daily living, such as bathing grooming, and dressing is often required. Initially, an individual may only need prompts or cues to perform these tasks, such as reminders to shower or having clothes laid out on the bed. However, at some point more hands-on assistance will be required. Establishing a routine becomes important, and caregivers need to exercise patience. Since individuals in this stage of dementia have greater difficulty communicating , caregivers need to talk slowly, clearly, and use non-verbal communication. Individuals will no longer be able to drive, so transportation will be required. It is also in this stage of dementia when it becomes unsafe to leave the individual alone, which means supervision is necessary.

Late Stage Dementia A person in this last stage of dementia requires a significant amount of care. Assistance and supervision is required 24 hours per day. Dementia patients may require assistance getting in and out of bed, moving from the bed to a chair, or may be bedridden and require help changing positions to avoid bedsores. Swallowing becomes an issue in late-stage dementia, and caregivers have to make sure food is cut into small pieces, is soft (like yogurt and applesauce), or is pureed. At some point, the individual will be 100% dependent on their caregiver and will no longer be able to complete any daily living activities alone. Not all families are equipped to offer this level of care. As mentioned previously, there are other options for care , such as hiring a part time caregiver or moving your loved one to a nursing home.

For more information on caring for individuals with dementia, click here . It’s important to remember, providing care for a loved one can be stressful, and self-care is a must.

Source: dementiacarecentral.com

Taking care of yourself

Despite your best efforts, caring for someone with dementia becomes harder as the disease moves on, and the person you are caring for becomes more dependent on you. This is a time when many family members need more support for themselves. The following tips are to help family members take care of themselves and plan for the future.

Avoid isolation and loneliness by keeping up with social activities and contact with others as much as possible.

Take care of your own health.

Join a caregiver support groupto connect with others living with the day-to-day issues of Alzheimer’s disease and facing practical challenges, grief and loss.

Watch for signs of stress and how it can affect your health and ability to provide care.

Be aware that you may already be grieving the gradual losses caused by the disease.

Seek professional help if feelings of depression or anxiety are overwhelming.

Be flexible about routines and expectations.

Try to be positive and use humour as a part of care strategies.

Make time for yourself by using respite care options, including adult day programs, professional homecare services, other family members or friends, volunteer caregivers and friendly visiting programs.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678