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How to Communicate with a Late-Stage Dementia Patient​

How to Communicate with a Late-Stage Dementia Patient

The later stages of dementia

In the later stages of dementia the person is likely to have more problems with verbal communication.

They may not understand what is being said to them and are less likely to be able to respond verbally as they may have limited or no speech. They may repeat the same phrase or sound, or may only be able to repeat a couple of words. Some people may start talking lots but their words don’t seem to make sense. In this case, try to identify the feelings that the person is trying to get across and respond to these. For example, if the person is smiling and chatting happily, respond to them in the same way.

Although the person may not be able to communicate verbally, they may still be able to show their needs and emotions in other ways. Rather than speaking, they may use behavior, facial expression, gestures, and sounds to try and communicate how they are feeling and what their needs are.

Try to support the person to communicate as much as possible. It can help to observe their body language, behavior, and facial expressions. Knowing the person and how they communicate will help you both to enjoy time together. It’s important to keep communicating with the person and look for opportunities for meaningful engagement. Finding ways to engage the person’s senses can help.

When you’re thinking about how to communicate with the person, bear in mind their needs and background – including their cultural needs. For example, people from some cultural backgrounds may feel uncomfortable or distressed if you’re too close to them when you’re communicating with them.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Communication Tips: Late Stage Dementia

The quality of life for people living with dementia is largely dependent on their connection with others. Maintaining a relationship can be a complex and challenging process, especially when verbal communication is lost. During the late stage of dementia, individuals may lose the capacity for recognizable speech, although words or phrases may occasionally be uttered.

However, even if the person can no longer communicate verbally or recognize you, they likely will still be able to communicate in other ways and feel your affection and reassurance. At this stage, non-verbal communication will become increasingly important. The world is primarily perceived through the senses by people with late-stage dementia. We as caregivers can take advantage of this and use the senses to maintain a connection.

• Touch: Hold the person’s hand. Give a gentle massage to the hands, legs, or feet.

• Smell: The person may enjoy the smell of a favorite perfume, flower, or food, which may bring back happy memories.

• Vision: Videos can be relaxing, especially those with scenes of nature and soft, calming sounds.

• Hearing: Reading to the person can be comforting, even if they may not understand the words. Speak gently and with affection; your tone can help the person feel safe and relaxed. Music is a universal language that promotes well-being for most of us. Sing together or play music, especially the type of music the person has enjoyed throughout their life.

Research suggests that although someone in the late stage of Alzheimer’s has lost the ability to talk and express needs, some of the person’s core sense of self remains intact. By maintaining a meaningful connection using nonverbal communication strategies, we’re able to tap into the person’s remaining faculties and truly improve their quality of life.

Source: tenderrose.com

keep eye contact when communicating

non-verbal communication (such as gestures, facial expression, and body language) can help

smile

use appropriate physical contact (such as holding hands) to let the person know you are there and offer reassurance

don’t rush – allow plenty of time and look for non-verbal clues from the person

even if you don’t think the person can follow what you’re saying, continue talking to them clearly. They may still feel a certain way even if they don’t fully understand what you’re saying

consider responding to them in the way they respond to you (‘mirroring’ them).

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Late Stage Communication

During the late stages of Alzheimer’s disease, problems with speech and understanding language increase considerably. Individuals may repeat questions and words over and over, they may contract several words into one to form nonsense words, and may even produce unintelligible sounds without a beginning or an end. It may be very difficult for a caregiver to know if a person is hungry, needs to use the toilet, or is in pain.

Here is where close observation of body language is important. Any utterance or gesture should be viewed as an attempt to convey meaning, and caregivers need to tune in to what the person is trying to communicate.

Source: ararf.org

Back to basics

How we communicate with a person with advanced dementia can vary, depending on what we know about the individual – particularly things they have enjoyed during their life. It can be influenced by where they are receiving the care (in their own home, care home or hospital) and the relationship they have with the people providing care and support.

It sometimes helps to think about how we communicate with a baby or toddler just starting out on their life. We have to be very careful when making comparisons between older people and children. We do not want to be in the habit of treating adult citizens as if they were children in a way that would feel patronising.

From a conceptual point of view, however, if we see human development as being triggered by the brain maturing through infancy and childhood, what we see happening in dementia can be viewed as a reversal of this process.

There are some striking similarities between what babies and toddlers need from their carers or care workers and what people with advanced or end-stage dementia need from theirs. Most people who have cared for babies or toddlers find some reactions that come quite naturally.

We feel drawn to use touch, to hold, to stroke gently, to achieve eye-contact, to try to make them smile, to soothe them when they cry and to make sure they are comfortable. Over time we get to know the personality of the baby or toddler and what they are trying to communicate.

Communicating with a person with advanced dementia requires us to use these same set of skills. We need to recognise that we are caring for someone who has a long life behind them and many stored memories and experiences. If we can find a bridge into these memories we can find a way to communicate with them and nurture their spirit at this final stage of life.

Source: scie.org.uk

Keep communicating

Communication should be there until the end. Never assume that the person cannot hear or understand you. Try reminiscing about their past, talk to them about things of interest (for example, how the family are and what the grandchildren are doing). Pick up on a hobby or interest they may have had (if they enjoyed horse racing, talk about the races that day, the form of the horses, the odds and the jockeys involved).

Non-verbal communication is vital. Touch can be used to stimulate senses and provide reassurance. Try to achieve eye contact. Be aware of the tone of your voice. Remember that the expression on your face will convey more than the content of your words.

Communicating well with a person in end-stage dementia is not written about extensively. It is something that is best seen first-hand. Some years ago, communication experts Kate Allan and John Killick undertook an in-depth piece of work in Australia called the Good Sunset Project specifically to develop ways of working with people with advanced dementia. They based this on a communication approach developed in coma work and got some very positive results.

Source: scie.org.uk

 

 

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Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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The Progression and Stages of Dementia​​

The Progression and Stages of Dementia​​

What to expect as the person’s dementia progresses

Caring for someone with dementia can be a great reward but it can be challenging at times. Prepare yourself by knowing what to expect.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Making medical decisions for people with dementia

With dementia, a person’s body may continue to be physically healthy. However, dementia causes the gradual loss of thinking, remembering, and reasoning abilities, which means that people with dementia at the end of life may no longer be able to make or communicate choices about their health care. If there are no advance care planning documents in place and the family does not know the person’s wishes, caregivers may need to make difficult decisions on behalf of their loved one about care and treatment approaches.

When making health care decisions for someone with dementia, it’s important to consider the person’s quality of life. For example, medications are available that may delay or keep symptoms from getting worse for a limited time. Medications also may help control some behavioral symptoms in people with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. However, some caregivers might not want drugs prescribed for people in the later stages of these diseases if the side effects outweigh the benefits.

It is important to consider the goals of care and weigh the benefits, risks, and side effects of any treatment. You may need to make a treatment decision based on the person’s comfort rather than trying to extend their life or maintain their abilities for longer.

Source: nia.nih.gov

The progression and stages of dementia

Dementia is progressive. This means symptoms may be relatively mild at first but they get worse with time. Dementia affects everyone differently, however it can be helpful to think of dementia progressing in ‘three stages’.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Why is dementia progressive?

Dementia is not a single condition. It is caused by different physical diseases of the brain, for example Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, DLB and FTD.

In the early stage of all types of dementia only a small part of the brain is damaged. In this stage, a person has fewer symptoms as only the abilities that depend on the damaged part of the brain are affected. These early symptoms are usually relatively minor. This is why ‘mild’ dementia is used as an alternative term for the early stage.

Each type of dementia affects a different area of the brain in the early stages. This is why symptoms vary between the different types. For example, memory loss is common in early-stage Alzheimer’s but is very uncommon in early-stage FTD.

As dementia progresses into the middle and later stages, the symptoms of the different dementia types tend to become more similar. This is because more of the brain is affected as dementia progresses.

Over time, the disease causing the dementia spreads to other parts of the brain. This leads to more symptoms because more of the brain is unable to work properly. At the same time, already-damaged areas of the brain become even more affected, causing symptoms the person already has to get worse.

Eventually most parts of the brain are badly damaged by the disease. This causes major changes in all aspects of memory, thinking, language, emotions and behaviour, as well as physical problems.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

What are Specific Care Needs at Each Stage?

An individual may not require care assistance after the initial diagnosis of dementia, but that will change as the disease progresses and symptoms become worse. There are about 16 million unpaid caregivers of people with dementia in the United States. While many caregivers are providing daily help for family members, they also hire someone to help. There are many options of care assistance, such as in-home care adult day care nursing home care . There is also financial assistance Early Stage Dementia As mentioned above, in the early stage of dementia a person can function rather independently and requires little care assistance. Simple reminders of appointments and names of people may be needed. Caregivers can also assist with coping strategies to help loved ones remain as independent as possible, such as writing out a daily to-do list and a schedule for taking medications. Safety should always be considered, and if any tasks cannot be performed safely alone, supervision and assistance should be provided. During this period of dementia, it’s a good idea for caregivers and loved ones to discuss the future. For example, a long-term care plan should be made and financial and legal matters put in place.

Middle Stage Dementia In the middle stage of dementia, an individual loses some independence. Assistance with activities of daily living, such as bathing grooming, and dressing is often required. Initially, an individual may only need prompts or cues to perform these tasks, such as reminders to shower or having clothes laid out on the bed. However, at some point more hands-on assistance will be required. Establishing a routine becomes important, and caregivers need to exercise patience. Since individuals in this stage of dementia have greater difficulty communicating , caregivers need to talk slowly, clearly, and use non-verbal communication. Individuals will no longer be able to drive, so transportation will be required. It is also in this stage of dementia when it becomes unsafe to leave the individual alone, which means supervision is necessary.

Late Stage Dementia A person in this last stage of dementia requires a significant amount of care. Assistance and supervision is required 24 hours per day. Dementia patients may require assistance getting in and out of bed, moving from the bed to a chair, or may be bedridden and require help changing positions to avoid bedsores. Swallowing becomes an issue in late-stage dementia, and caregivers have to make sure food is cut into small pieces, is soft (like yogurt and applesauce), or is pureed. At some point, the individual will be 100% dependent on their caregiver and will no longer be able to complete any daily living activities alone. Not all families are equipped to offer this level of care. As mentioned previously, there are other options for care , such as hiring a part time caregiver or moving your loved one to a nursing home.

For more information on caring for individuals with dementia, click here . It’s important to remember, providing care for a loved one can be stressful, and self-care is a must.

Source: dementiacarecentral.com

Taking care of yourself

Despite your best efforts, caring for someone with dementia becomes harder as the disease moves on, and the person you are caring for becomes more dependent on you. This is a time when many family members need more support for themselves. The following tips are to help family members take care of themselves and plan for the future.

Avoid isolation and loneliness by keeping up with social activities and contact with others as much as possible.

Take care of your own health.

Join a caregiver support groupto connect with others living with the day-to-day issues of Alzheimer’s disease and facing practical challenges, grief and loss.

Watch for signs of stress and how it can affect your health and ability to provide care.

Be aware that you may already be grieving the gradual losses caused by the disease.

Seek professional help if feelings of depression or anxiety are overwhelming.

Be flexible about routines and expectations.

Try to be positive and use humour as a part of care strategies.

Make time for yourself by using respite care options, including adult day programs, professional homecare services, other family members or friends, volunteer caregivers and friendly visiting programs.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Common Misconceptions about Dementia – Duplicate – [#1457]

Normal Aging vs Early Signs of Dementia

The Truth About Aging and Dementia

As we age, our brains change, but Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias are not an inevitable part of aging. In fact, up to 40% of dementia cases may be prevented or delayed. It helps to understand what’s normal and what’s not when it comes to brain health.

Normal brain aging may mean slower processing speeds and more trouble multitasking, but routine memory, skills, and knowledge are stable and may even improve with age. It’s normal to occasionally forget recent events such as where you put your keys or the name of the person you just met.

In the United States, 6.2 million people age 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease, the most common type of dementia. People with dementia have symptoms of cognitive decline that interfere with daily life—including disruptions in language, memory, attention, recognition, problem solving, and decision-making.
Source: cdc.gov

The differences between normal aging and dementia

If you are experiencing difficulties with memory, know that they may not be signs of dementia. It could be memory loss as a part of normal aging.

If you are concerned that you or someone you know has dementia, please talk to your doctor.

Source: alzheimer.ca

What is aging?

Aging is a natural process of our lives. As we age, we experience gradual changes to our brains and bodies. Some of these changes affect our physical and mental abilities, and may increase our risk of disease.

Each one of us experiences aging differently. The extent of how we experience changes due to aging, and the point in our lives when they start becoming more noticeable, varies from person to person.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), each person should have the ability to live a long and healthy life. This is considered healthy aging.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Memory, Forgetfulness, and Aging: What’s Normal and What’s Not?

Many older adults worry about their memory and other thinking abilities. For example, they might be concerned about taking longer than before to learn new things, or they may sometimes forget to pay a bill. These changes are usually signs of mild forgetfulness — often a normal part of aging — not serious memory problems.

Source: nia.nih.gov

What’s normal forgetfulness and what’s not?

What’s the difference between normal, age-related forgetfulness and a serious memory problem? It’s normal to forget things once in a while as we age, but serious memory problems make it hard to do everyday things like driving, using the phone, and finding your way home.

Talk with your doctor to determine whether memory and other cognitive problems, such as the ability to clearly think and learn, are normal and what may be causing them.

Signs that it might be time to talk to a doctor include:

Asking the same questions over and over again

Getting lost in places a person knows well

Having trouble following recipes or directions

Becoming more confused about time, people, and places

Not taking care of oneself —eating poorly, not bathing, or behaving unsafely

 

Source: nia.nih.gov

 

Normal Aging vs. Dementia

While some mild changes in cognition are considered a normal part of the aging process, . Normal age-related declines are subtle and mostly affect the speed of thinking and attentional control. In abnormal aging, declines in cognition are more severe and may include other thinking abilities, such as rapid forgetting or difficulties navigating, solving common problems, expressing oneself in conversation or behaving outside of social rules. Abnormal aging can also include the motor system resulting in excessive tripping, falls or tremor. Often it is difficult to determine exactly when a person should be concerned with cognitive changes they may be experiencing. Symptoms vary from person to person – what is normal for one person may not be normal for another. This contributes to the challenges clinicians face when determining whether what someone is experiencing is a significant dementia or not.

Source: memory.ucsf.edu

When Forgetfulness Is a Problem

If memory loss makes it hard for you to handle your daily tasks, that’s a sign you shouldn’t ignore. Are you forgetting things you only just heard? Asking the same question over and over again? Relying on lots of paper or electronic reminders just to get through the day? Talk to your doctor if you or your family notices that happening to you.

 

Source: webmd.com

Signs of Dementia

Sometimes, there does come a point at which forgetfulness becomes more prominent and affects daily life. These symptoms can point to dementia. Some signs of a more serious problem, such as dementia, include:

Not being able to remember a recent conversation or event, or forgetting what’s happening while it’s happening

Being unable to learn or remember new information

Having significant language issues, such as struggling to have a conversation because of word-finding problems

Experiencing significant mood or personality changes such as depression, anxiety, or intense irritability

Appearing apathetic or withdrawn

Frequently pausing when talking

Forgetting family members’ names

Often getting lost and needing help finding one’s way

Experiencing significant declines in reaction time, which may affect driving, cooking, or the ability to recover from tripping and falling

The key to understanding what is normal aging and what could be dementia is evaluating how it affects daily life. For example, if your loved one is anxious because they can no longer manage their checkbook or monthly bills, you should speak with a physician.

Are you caring for someone with dementia? The Caregiver’s Complete Guide to Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care includes tips to help you accommodate your loved one’s changing needs.

Source: arborcompany.com

The different levels of memory loss

Age-associated memory impairment

If you are experiencing difficulties with memory, but:

They are not noticeably disrupting your daily life,

They are not affecting your ability to complete tasks as you usually would,

You have no difficulty learning and remembering new things and

There’s no underlying medical condition that is causing your memory problems,

Then you have what’s known as age-associated memory impairment.

Age-associated memory impairment is considered to be a normal part of aging. It doesn’t mean you have dementia.

Though you may have difficulties remembering things on occasion, like where you left your keys, a password for a website or the name of a former classmate, these are not signs you have dementia. You may not remember things as quickly as you used to, but most of the time there is no cause for concern.

Source: alzheimer.ca

When to visit the doctor for memory loss

If you, a family member, or friend has problems remembering recent events or thinking clearly, talk with a doctor. He or she may suggest a thorough checkup to see what might be causing the symptoms. You may also wish to talk with your doctor about opportunities to participate in research on cognitive health and aging.

At your doctor visit, he or she can perform tests and assessments, which may include a brain scan, to help determine the source of memory problems. Your doctor may also recommend you see a neurologist, a doctor who specializes in treating diseases of the brain and nervous system.

Memory and other thinking problems have many possible causes, including depression, an infection, or medication side effects. Sometimes, the problem can be treated, and cognition improves. Other times, the problem is a brain disorder, such as Alzheimer’s disease, which cannot be reversed.

Finding the cause of the problems is important for determining the best course of action. Once you know the cause, you can make the right treatment plan. People with memory problems should make a follow-up appointment to check their memory every six to 12 months. They can ask a family member, friend, or the doctor’s office to remind them if they’re worried they’ll forget.

Learn more about cognitive health and Alzheimer’s and related dementias.

 

Source: nia.nih.gov

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Common Misconceptions about Dementia

Common Misconceptions about Dementia

Common Misconceptions About Dementia

The World Health Organization estimates that more than 50 million people across the globe have dementia. Furthermore, at least 10 million new cases arise annually. Unfortunately, these statistics mean that most people know at least one person who has lived with or currently lives with dementia.

If you or a loved one has dementia, knowledge is power. Not only does correct information allow you to better advocate for your loved one and plan for the future, but it can also allow you the comfort of knowing more about what to expect from the disease. However, there are quite a few common misconceptions about dementia out there. Here are some of them so that you can learn the truths that will help you continue to know more about this disease.

Source: arborcompany.com

Below are the common misconceptions about dementia:

Dementia is inevitable with age

This statement is not true. Dementia is not a normal part of aging.

According to a report that the Alzheimer’s Association published, Alzheimer’s disease, which is the most common form of dementia, affects 3% of people aged 65–74 years in the U.S.

As a result of the risk increasing as we age, 17% of people aged 75–84 years and 32% of people aged 85 years and older have a dementia diagnosis.

Source: medicalnewstoday.com

All types of memory loss are a sign of dementia

“One of the biggest misconceptions about dementia is that every kind of memory loss someone might experience is Alzheimer’s disease and that’s not true,” Dr. Sicotte says.

Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, there are many other types.

Dr. Sicotte says that a combination of underlying changes in the brain can cause memory loss, but memory loss is only one component of diagnosing dementia.

Faces of Cedars-Sinai: Neurologist Nancy Sicotte

Source: cedars-sinai.org

 

Dementia only affects older people.

Reality: Dementia can affect people from their 30s onwards.

Dementia is a progressive, degenerative disease of the brain. People over 65 are most likely to get it, but dementia can appear in people under retirement age. When this happens, it’s known as young onset dementia.

Learn more about young onset dementia.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Drinking out of aluminum cans or cooking in aluminum pots and pans can lead to Alzheimer’s disease.

Reality: During the 1960s and 1970s, aluminum emerged as a possible suspect in Alzheimer’s. This suspicion led to concern about exposure to aluminum through everyday sources such as pots and pans, beverage cans, antacids and antiperspirants. Since then, studies have failed to confirm any role for aluminum in causing Alzheimer’s. Experts today focus on other areas of research, and few believe that everyday sources of aluminum pose any threat.

Source: alz.org

Flu shots increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Reality: A theory linking flu shots to a greatly increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease has been proposed by a U.S. doctor whose license was suspended by the South Carolina Board of Medical Examiners. Several mainstream studies link flu shots and other vaccinations to a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease and overall better health.

Source: alz.org

If someone in your family has dementia, that means you will get it as well.

Fact: Some forms of dementia have a genetic component, but there is not a strong genetic link in most cases.

While dementia is genetic and inherited in some cases, not all cases of dementia are hereditary. If a family member has dementia, it may indicate a higher risk of developing dementia, but this is not a guarantee. Some forms of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease, are more prone to being passed on through families. Other forms of dementia, such as those caused by brain injuries or Lyme disease, are less likely to impact multiple family members.

Source: therecoveryvillage.com

Dementia is untreatable and cannot be slowed down

There is no cure for dementia, but early symptoms can be managed through a combination of medication and lifestyle changes.

Early diagnosis is important for successful treatment and extended quality of life.

You can also support risk reduction strategies. Just as you would with heart disease and stroke, you can advise your patients to make life changes that reduce the likelihood they will develop dementia – the earlier, the better.

Source: dementia.org.au

People living with dementia don’t understand what’s happening around them

This is another frequent myth related to dementia. Many people believe that because those living with dementia struggle to communicate effectively, it means that they are not aware of what is happening around them. However, the part of the brain which deals with communication is separate to the area which deals with awareness. This means that, sadly, most do have thoughts to communicate although they struggle to relay these.

Source: barchester.com

People with Alzheimer’s have no hope.

Learning how to live with the disease is key to continuing a meaningful life. Early diagnosis and medications can help. Additionally, caregivers and the person with Alzheimer’s should both seek out support groups and learn to revise life goals and how to offer and/or accept help. In loving environments, people with the disease can participate and enjoy life many years after diagnosis.

Source: keckmedicine.org

Conclusion

While there is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s or dementia, it’s important to recognize the signs and talk to your doctor about the risk factors.

Source: cedars-sinai.org

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Things You Need To Know About Assisted Living For Parents

Things You Need To Know About Assisted Living For Parents

Introduction

Are you worried about your aging parent? Perhaps your loved one fell at home a few months ago, or perhaps you have noticed that they are not taking their medication as prescribed. These are common concerns that can keep you up at night as you struggle to find the right way to keep your loved one healthy and happy.

However, it can be difficult to start the process of searching for assistance. The senior care industry is large, and anyone can feel lost or overwhelmed in the fray. Fortunately, we have compiled everything you need to know about a common and very helpful senior living level of care that could benefit your aging loved one: assisted living.

Source: arborcompany.com

What is assisted living?

Assisted living provides long-term housing and care for seniors. Assisted living residents are generally active, but may need support with activities of daily living (ADLs) , such as bathing, dressing, and using the toilet. Seniors in assisted living can expect personalized care, nutritious meals, a wide range of social activities to cater to a variety of interests, and a sense of community in a safe, residential setting.

Source: aplaceformom.com

What are the benefits of assisted living?

While each community is different, assisted living offers services and amenities to focus on important aspects of senior wellness, including physical health, intellectual stimulation, and social connection. These three foundational pillars help slow cognitive decline and keep seniors healthier and happier longer.

Source: aplaceformom.com

Include Your Loved Ones in the Process

Just because you think your parents need help with medication management, transportation, and meals doesn’t mean they’ll feel the same way about their own needs for care. Your mom might be in denial about how much assistance with day-to-day activities she really needs, or your dad might be resistant to making the move to an assisted living facility.

That’s why it’s critical to include both your loved one and the rest of the family in the process of developing the plan. Actively listen to their concerns. Be responsive to their questions. This will show them that you hear their concerns and want their input on making the decision. The more inclusive you can be, the less likely you will later face roadblocks.

 

Source: arborsassistedliving.com

What Services are Offered at The Nursing Home?

You need to be looking for nursing homes that can provide the services and options you need, and one that can do it with excellence because your family deserves it. If a nursing home facility doesn’t offer a reliable skilled nursing service for its seniors, then that is a red flag. Trusting the life of a loved one in another’s hands is not an easy decision and should be weighed carefully.

Source: stonebridgeseniorliving.com

Introduce the Amenities and Features

When talking to your parents, you should focus on the amenities and features offered in these assisted living communities. For example, did you know that the residents of these communities participate in daily physical activities to improve their health and mobility? Also, experienced chefs prepare delicious and nutritious meals for people in assisted living communities every day. This means that your loved ones will be able to get all the vitamins, minerals, and nutrients they need to live a healthy life. Also, specific food allergies will be taken into consideration to avoid illnesses and other health problems.

Source: terrabellaseniorliving.com

Understand how assisted living can help

Big changes can result in significant stress, especially when the person experiencing the change is elderly. When considering a new home for your parents, review the steps outlined in these articles:

Evaluate your loved one’s needs.

Start with an assessment of their activities of daily living, or ADLs. Can they bathe, dress, and move about easily? How much help do they already require?

Read up on what assisted living offers.

The phrase “assisted living” encompasses far more than people realize, but it’s not the same as nursing homes or memory care two different community types with more daily involvement and specialized care than what’s usually offered in assisted living.

Assisted living communities have evolved with the times. Many are rich with current amenities and activities while maintaining a level of care that allows your loved one to stay safe and healthy.

Talk to a Senior Living Advisor.

Source: aplaceformom.com

Do a background check

For assisted living facilities are on the National Center for Assisted Living’s website. The list also contains contact information for each state’s regulators, who can guide you on how to find information about a facility. Your state’s regulations

If your state requires a license for an assisted living facility, make sure it has one. Ask to review the most recent licensing report.

Licensing agencies may have online facility-complaint databases.

Make sure you clearly understand the terms, and if you have questions, get them answered before you sign. 

• How much are entrance fees and monthly rent, and is a security deposit required?

• What level of personal and health care services are provided?

• What privileges do residents have? For example, are they permitted to bring personal furniture?

• What are the transfer and discharge policies? What specific reasons would lead to a resident being asked to move out, and how much notice would be given?

• Is a resident’s space held if he or she has to be hospitalized?

• Does the contract put any limitations on your right to bring legal action for injury, negligence or other causes? Consumer Reports cautions that many residences include arbitration clauses, which require disputes to be settled outside the legal system via a third party.

Source: aarp.org

How to Make the Transition to Assisted Living

Once you choose a community, your parent/s will be assessed by a staff member. This assessment is to ensure the community knows the medical history and needs of your loved one and that everyone is on the same page regarding expectations and costs. During your assessment time, the nursing staff will work with you to get medications and medical records transferred over to the community so there is no gap in care during the move.

After the assessment, you will be assigned a move-in date. The time before the move is bound to be stressful as you and your loved one work to pack up items to move, to donate, and to sell. Use this time to remind yourself and your loved one about the positive aspects of the new assisted living community. This is also a great time to schedule another meal at the community so that your loved one can meet a few new friends.

Finally, during move-in day, expect a hustle and bustle of activity. You and your parent/s will have assistance with moving in furniture and boxes, and staff will pop in to introduce themselves. No doubt you will also meet a few curious neighbors who pass by to welcome your loved one to their new home. Be sure to pick up the latest community newsletter and activity calendar so you can choose a few interesting events for your loved one to attend in the first week at their new home.

Sooner than you think, your loved one will feel at home in their new assisted living apartment. You will love hearing about delicious meals, new friends, and fun events. Most importantly, you will love knowing that your loved one is safe, healthy, and well-cared-for in their new assisted living home.

 

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Dealing with Dementia

Introduction

Caring for a loved one with dementia poses many challenges for families and caregivers. People with dementia from conditions such as Alzheimer’s and related diseases have a progressive biological brain disorder that makes it more and more difficult for them to remember things, think clearly, communicate with others, and take care of themselves. In addition, dementia can cause mood swings and even change a person’s personality and behavior. This fact sheet provides some practical strategies for dealing with the troubling behavior problems and communication difficulties often encountered when caring for a person with dementia.

Dementia behavior: Confusion

Memory loss and confusion become more common as dementia progresses.

Memory loss can lead to confusion and confusion often manifests as a senior asking the same questions over and over, not recognizing formerly familiar people or places, or becoming disoriented. Caregivers who spend many hours with their loved one may hear phrases and answer questions on repeat: “I want to go home!” “This isn’t my house.” “When are we leaving?” “Why are we here?”

Source: aplaceformom.com

Common causes of confusion

Like many dementia behaviors, confusion can have a number of triggers or root causes. Factors that may contribute to disorientation include the following:

Sundown syndrome or delirium. Up to two-thirds of dementia patients experience sundown syndrome, an evening behavioral shift characterized by increased memory loss, agitation, confusion, and anger. “It may not exactly happen at sundown, but there’s always this hour the witching hour where suddenly the same person may completely change,” Hashmi says.

An unexpected change. Did your senior loved one just move to a new place? Did their routine change?

Paranoia and hallucinations. Dementia leads to complex changes in the brain, which can result in delusion. Seniors may see things that aren’t really there, develop false beliefs, or become suspicious of caregivers and loved ones.

Source: aplaceformom.com

Common changes in behaviour

In the middle to later stages of most types of dementia, a person may start to behave differently. This can be distressing for both the person with dementia and those who care for them.

Some common changes in behaviour include:

repeating the same question or activity over and over again

night-time waking and sleep disturbance

following a partner or spouse around everywhere

loss of self-confidence, which may show as apathy or disinterest in their usual activities

If you’re caring for someone who’s showing these behaviours, it’s important to try to understand why they’re behaving like this, which is not always easy.

You may find it reassuring to remember that these behaviours may be how someone is communicating their feelings. It may help to look at different ways of communicating with someone with dementia Sometimes these behaviours are not a dementia symptom. They can be a result of frustration with not being understood or with their environment, which they no longer find familiar but confusing.

Source: nhs.uk

Coping with dementia

As dementia progresses, each person will find their own way of coping with, and reacting and adapting to, the changes it brings. Developing these coping strategies can be a gradual and subconscious process.

The practical impact of dementia The psychological and emotional impact of dementia

You are here: Coping with dementia Carers: looking after yourself when supporting someone with dementia Understanding and supporting a person with dementia – useful organisations

Coping strategies may include:

practical strategies – eg setting up reminders or prompts, preparing advance decisions or a Lasting Power of Attorney for the future

social strategies – eg relying on family help, seeking spiritual support, joining new activity groups

emotional strategies – eg using humour, focusing on short-term pleasure or living for the moment, focusing on positive aspects

health improvement strategies – eg exercising more, adopting a healthier diet, cutting down on alcohol or smoking.

If a carer understands the person’s coping strategies, they will be able to support them better.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Handling Troubling Behavior

Some of the greatest challenges of caring for a loved one with dementia are the personality and behavior changes that often occur. You can best meet these challenges by using creativity, flexibility, patience, and compassion. It also helps to not take things personally and maintain your sense of humor.

To start, consider these ground rules:

We cannot change the person. The person you are caring for has a brain disorder that shapes who he has become. When you try to control or change his behavior, you’ll most likely be unsuccessful or be met with resistance. It’s important to:

Try to accommodate the behavior, not control the behavior. For example, if the person insists on sleeping on the floor, place a mattress on the floor to make him more comfortable.

Remember that we can change our behavior or the physical environment. Changing our own behavior will often result in a change in our loved one’s behavior.

Check with the doctor first. Behavioral problems may have an underlying medical reason: perhaps the person is in pain or experiencing an adverse side effect from medications. In some cases, like incontinence or hallucinations, there may be some medication or treatment that can assist in managing the problem.

Behavior has a purpose. People with dementia typically cannot tell us what they want or need. They might do something, like take all the clothes out of the closet on a daily basis, and we wonder why. It is very likely that the person is fulfilling a need to be busy and productive. Always consider what need the person might be trying to meet with their behavior and, when possible, try to accommodate them.

Behavior is triggered. It is important to understand that all behavior is triggered it occurs for a reason. It might be something a person did or said that triggered a behavior, or it could be a change in the physical environment. The root to changing behavior is disrupting the patterns that we create. Try a different approach, or try a different consequence.

What works today, may not tomorrow. The multiple factors that influence troubling behaviors, and the natural progression of the disease process, mean that solutions that are effective today may need to be modified tomorrow or may no longer work at all. The key to managing difficult behaviors is being creative and flexible in your strategies to address a given issue.

Get support from others. You are not alone there are many others caring for someone with dementia. Locate your nearest Area Agency on Aging, the local chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, to find support groups, organizations, and services that can help you. Expect that, like the loved one you are caring for, you will have good days and bad days. Develop strategies for coping with the bad days.

The following is an overview of the most common dementia-associated behaviors, with suggestions that may be useful in handling them. You’ll find additional resources listed at the end of this fact sheet.

Source: caregiver.org

If you’re looking after someone with dementia

Your needs as a carer are as important as the person you’re caring for.

To help care for yourself:

Try to make some time for yourself, but if it’s difficult to leave the person alone, ask if someone can be with them for a while, such as a friend, relative, or someone from a support group

Source: nhs.uk

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Uncategorized

The Importance of Vaccines in Nursing Homes​

The Importance of Vaccines in Nursing Homes

Host: Nursing homes that want to keep their federal funding will have to make sure their staff is vaccinated against the coronavirus. The white house says the department of health and human services will draw up new regulations that require staff to all nursing homes receiving medicare and medicaid funds to get the COVID vaccine and if they don’t those facilities could lose funding. The move marks the first time President Biden has threatened to withhold federal funds over vaccinations and this could affect more than 15 000 nursing homes which employs about 1.3 million people according to the centers for medicare and medicaid services about 40 percent of those workers are not vaccinated. Well today we are joined by Chris Braley from Braley Care Homes and here we always are glad when you stop by.

Chris: Thank you!

H: And this probably hits home with you a little bit i know that you all are big on getting everyone vaccinated how are you all at this point?

C: yeah it’s interesting we actually um i’ve just created a policy this week um for our facility uh where all my staff will have to be vaccinated and we set a date by october 1st they need to have at least one shot.

H: Right and then of course you all started months ago with your residents as well.

C: oh yeah yeah we started i think we did a show

H: Right when you got to get the vaccine.

C: very eager to get in and we had a great turnout with our staff at that time and uh most everyone got vaccinated.

H: Yeah okay so what is your policy if friends or family members want to come in and visit one of your residents? what do they need to know before they come in?

C: well obviously you know we do a little screening with them and they they don’t want to if they’re feeling sick they certainly don’t want to come in we do have the ability to do a covid test a 15-minute test so that they can always get tested before coming in to ensure that they don’t have COVID but we do we are still doing visitations and when they come in they’ll either visit in a bedroom or we have a nice courtyard and a gazebo and they can go out and visit outside.

H: yeah fresh air that is nice and in your line of work why is it so important to make sure you have these policies and make sure that everyone is being as safe as possible

C: yeah i mean you know it really when you think of COVID i think of this as really a war with the virus right and we we need a defense and to me you know masking and vaccines are a way to defeat this virus and you have to you have to do this and of course as a society we have to have more and more people

H: right!

C: to do this in order to win this war.

H: Right, okay so what would be your i guess your standard practice of someone watching right now they think they would like to come in to tour maybe they have a loved one that they would like to get at your facility are you allowing those type of visits?

C: oh yeah yeah yeah we do tours but again we kind of ask you know have you been vaccinated right and if they have then uh you know we’ll have them come in they still do a screening check and temperature and things of that nature and uh and they have to mask up and then we’ll give a tour

H: (okay) and we’ve got the information on the screen now if anyone at home would like to contact you we’ve got your phone number there you all have a website you’re on Facebook and one thing that they will notice if they check out your facebook page and website you do a lot of fun things with the residents.

C: And we like to get silly.

H: You do and you all post those which is very nice so with the olympics did you do some fun things.

C: We did, we did we did. We had a huge bowling competition (wow) and i was amazed at how many residents got involved and were so competitive with each other so it was a real success

H: yeah, because it’s a very important this time or any time to make sure their their morale is lifted too

C: oh yeah absolutely and and they are you know they’re having a fun time and they’re looking forward to the next

H: Which will probably be what? Fall fests and Halloween themed things

C: Absolutely yeah we’ll have all sorts of costumes!

H: yes well chris thanks for what you all are doing at your Braley Care Homes there and thanks for stopping by again and sharing what you all are doing

C: Absolutely! Thank you, Susan.


Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

© 2020 Braley Care Homes, Inc.

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Braley Care Homes’ Halloween Bash

Braley Care Homes' Halloween Bash

H1: Hey Chris Braley with Braley Care Homes is here!
H2: and for you that means fun for the residents but also fun for chris too (oh yeah) and the employees you guys have a really good time at halloween this is just a big thing and it’s important to involve the residents
Chris: Oh absolutely we’re just big kids you know and we get to dress up and have fun and get the residents laughing and we try to get the nostalgia of going back to things that they may remember and um so we do parties um like uh with beetlejuice um which was a big hit
H1: and we have some pictures too that we want to show
H2: yeah oh there you go
H1: that is so fun!
H2: That’s terrific! and you so that’s the thing when they see you coming through the hall it changes the every day and these are the little things you know something like this taking the time to you know you got okay i want to make sure that was a fake mustache
Chris: Yeah
H1: yeah you’ve got the fake mustache on gomez the whole gomez look.
He has just a such a good time!
H2: why is it important for that to be a part of you know of the lifestyle there at Braley Homes? Why do you think that that it’s important to recognize this and the chance to have fun
Chris: and that’s that’s the key thing it’s fun you know we all need fun in our life and so just because we get older doesn’t mean we can’t have fun so it’s just trying to find these creative ways to to get a residence laughing. I always say it’s like gold if you can get someone to laugh you know that’s magical!
H1: i bet their eyes really do light up once you all oh yeah you know come out there and you’re more extravagant
Chris: and the sillier we get
H2: okay, so what what are the plans this year? Can’t you reveal is this going to be a secret?
Chris: Big reveal is the wizard of oz.
H2: oh okay okay so uh do you have any idea which part you’ll be?
Chris: yes! (can i guess?) my activities director lorraine… You can guess, sure!
H2: are you going to be dressing as either the scarecrow pin man cowardly lion one of the three?
Chris: i’m going to be the cowardly lion.
H2: oh that’s great what a costume that’s going to be!
W: In addition to the costumes which is enough i think what else do you do at these holiday parties?
C: yeah of course we uh we’ll prepare you know these certain meals and for halloween they’re gonna be you know the fake fingers and just different stuff like that just try to have just a bunch of fun and make it look uh unique and a lot of decorations in the facility which we’re starting that process now
M: what’s the reaction what do people say and not only people who who live there the residents but their family members when they find out about this idea what’s the reaction that people give you?
C: oh they love it they love it they like seeing us get silly yeah and the more the marrier and sometimes of course the families will will do that too but as we were talking earlier you know with the pandemic we can’t have the families in all the one time
H2: right so that makes it even more special and even more important to have events that bring joy and happiness and really a lot of memories maybe it’ll remind them of dressing up with their families and their kids when they were little
C: oh yeah we used to um before again before pandemic we would have kids come in oh yeah and we’d have the residents hand out candy
H2: that’s right, yeah, has there been is there any science behind this idea of doing this kind of thing and having fun any science any studies things that you know psychologists have put out or geriatricians have put out about this what’s the the thinking behind doing this the the logical thinking behind?
C: yeah! there is science behind that um and and a lot of what i’ve read it’s about basically stimulating mind and body and you know when you think of alzheimer’s disease yeah plaque and tangles forming in the brain is destroying neurons but then what they found is the more that we can think and challenge and move and activate activate absolutely it’s like a muscle the more you use it you know then you lose it less right so you can still battle this disease uh even though it’s chronic um to to have a more prolonged life and healthier life.
H2: yeah it makes perfect sense really when you think about that that that is you know if motion is lotion for our joints and everything else right right then that would be the same thing with the brain.
C: absolutely!
H1: yeah you mentioned alzheimer’s october is a big month for alzheimer’s awareness so tell us about what uh a big event planned at the end of this month.
C: yes october 30th at power park uh the alzheimer’s association we’re having the walk 10 to alzheimer’s so i encourage everybody to come down and be a part of it also you get to dress up you know for the walk it’s always this time of year in charleston and uh and people will bring their pets their dogs and dress them up it’s it’s fun and silly
H2: how about family members getting involved how how will they be able to get involved in that i guess maybe since it’s outside you can have a few more
C: yeah you can register now online um i think it’s all alz.org backslash um if they go online they can do it but you can also register that day registration starts at eight a.m on saturday and the walk starts at 9 30.
W: right there at the ballpark yes yep okay easy to find there
H2: that’s good it’s it’s so important to do these kind of things and and to your point when it comes right down to it you know if laughter is medicine then fun is the same thing because fun and laughter go hand in hand and i’m sure they just so much appreciate it people who and their families
C: Yes yeah absolutely!
H1: Well have fun next time you’re here we want to see a picture of the wizard of oz
H2: That’ll be a good one to post all right chris thanks for coming in really always appreciate it!
C: Thank you!

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

© 2020 Braley Care Homes, Inc.