Categories
Uncategorized

Stimulating Activities for Alzheimer’s Patients

Stimulating Activities for Alzheimer’s Patients

No one wants to end up with a debilitating disease, particularly one like Alzheimer’s. Are there steps that can be taken to slow the disease’s progression?

Experts say the main thing people can do to prevent or slow down Alzheimer’s disease is to stimulate their brains.

Whether a person is in a care facility or receiving home care services, brain stimulation activities can and should be done on a regular basis.

Source: skylarkseniorcare.com

 

stimulating activities for alzheimers

Exercise and physical activity

Exercise and physical activity can have lots of benefits for people with Alzheimers. It can help regulate their sleep and prevent restlessness and sleeplessness in the evening. It can also help maintain a positive mood and lower the risk of them developing depression.

Physical activities may include:

Walking around their neighborhood or a local park

Depending on age and fitness, you could try tandem biking

Water aerobics – health and fitness centers often have workshops and classes specifically for elderly people or people with Alzheimers

Fishing

Source: supercarers.com

Work on Puzzles

We love puzzles because they’re like exercise for the brain. A person has to exercise their problem-solving ability, as well as making sense of the shapes to complete the picture in front of them.

Source: skylarkseniorcare.com

Reminisce about their life

Long-term memory often remains stronger for longer in people living with Alzheimers. It can be wonderful to engage your loved ones in discussions or activities about their lives. It’s also a fantastic opportunity for you to learn more about your loved one.

Some ideas include:

Interview your loved one about their life using a video recorder

Talk to them about their life, their childhood, and their family

Look through photos and make a photo album

Watch family videos together

Ask them about their favorite memories around a particular topic, such as their favorite holiday or oldest friend

Source: supercarers.com

Simulate handy tasks
If your aging relative always loved to tinker, suggest a project with visible results. Painting wooden boards and fitting together PVC pipes are good activities for seniors with high motor function. Wooden or plastic play tools provide a similar experience for people with Alzheimers.

Untie knots
Tie loose knots along a thick rope. The elderly person may enjoy untying them, though avoid making the knots too tight or using a rough rope.

Connect with others: Make phone or video calls to friends and loved ones. Host a virtual tea, coffee time, or happy hour. Take the time to write them a note or card. Chances are, they’re bored at home, too, and will welcome the connection!

Read the Newspaper Together

This may not seem like a big deal, but reading is also a form of mental exercise. Reading about current events can help stimulate both memories and emotions as well.

Source: skylarkseniorcare.com

Perseverance and flexibility are key

If your loved one isn’t interested in the activity or seems resistant, just take a break and try again later. You could also try a different activity or ask your loved one how you could make this one more enjoyable for them. You should also focus on the process of the activity, not the results – what matters most is that your loved one enjoys the time and feels useful.

 

Source: supercarers.com

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

Categories
Uncategorized

How Seniors Can Prevent Falls at Home

How Seniors Can Prevent Falls at Home

Did you know that one in four older Americans falls every year? Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries for people aged 65+. Falls can result in hip fractures, broken bones, and head injuries. And even falls without a major injury can cause an older adult to become fearful or depressed, making it difficult for them to stay active. If you have an aging parent, grandparent, or neighbor in your life, helping them reduce their risk of falling is a great way to help them stay healthy and independent for as long as possible.

The good news about falls is that most of them can be prevented. The key is to know where to look. Here are some common factors that can lead to a fall:

  • Balance and gait: As we age, most of us lose some coordination, flexibility, and balance— primarily through inactivity, making it easier to fall.
  • Vision: In the aging eye, less light reaches the retina—making contrasting edges, tripping hazards, and obstacles harder to see.
  • Medications: Some prescriptions and over-the-counter medications can cause dizziness, dehydration, or interactions with each other that can lead to a fall.
  • Environment: Most seniors have lived in their homes for a long time and have never thought about simple modifications that might keep it safer as they age.
  • Chronic conditions: More than 80% of older adults have at least one chronic condition like diabetes, stroke, or arthritis. Often, these increase the risk of falling because they result in lost function, inactivity, depression, pain, or multiple medications.

Fall Prevention: Why Older Adults Fall & What to Do

To be honest, people don’t usually ask me this.

Instead, they want to know things like “How do I keep my mother from falling?” or “What should I do? My grandfather’s been falling.”

After all, falls are a scary thing. Most people know that falls are dangerous for older adults.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) reports that one in five falls causes a serious injury such as a broken bone or head injury. Fear of falling can also seriously affect an aging adult’s quality of life and sadly, can keep a person from being active and thriving.

So, many older adults and family caregivers are interested in fall prevention because the risks are so great. And the good news is that although it’s not possible to prevent all falls, it almost always IS possible to take actions that will reduce the chance of a bad fall.

If you want to learn more, you’re in the right place.

In this post, I’ll cover:

How understanding why aging adults fall can help you keep an older parent — or yourself — safer,

Why personalized fall prevention plans work better than relying on general fall prevention tips,

The four-step process I use to help older adults prevent falls,

A practical example showing you how to use these steps to avoid falls yourself.

Source: betterhealthwhileaging.net

What are some causes of falls?

The normal changes of aging, like poor eyesight or poor hearing, can make you more likely to fall. Illnesses and physical conditions can affect your strength and balance. Poor lighting or throw rugs in your home can make you more likely to trip or slip.

The side effects of some medicines can upset your balance and make you fall. Medicines for depression, sleep problems and high blood pressure often cause falls. Some medicines for diabetes and heart conditions can also make you unsteady on your feet.

You may be more likely to fall if you are taking four or more medicines. You are also likely to fall if you have changed your medicine within the past two weeks.

Source: aafp.org

What are some of the interventions you’ve used that can help seniors?

You can do so many things. First of all, I tell everybody you’ve got to do some balance training. Tai chi is probably the best exercise to prevent falls, but whatever works for you. And, interestingly, just walking does not reduce your risk of falling. So a lot of doctors will say, “Just get out and walk 20 minutes every day, and that’ll keep you safe. That’ll help you stay healthy.” Walking is great for your heart; it’s great for your brain; it’s great for lots of it. But in order to really reduce your risk for falls, you’ve got to do something specific to balance.

Enlist their support in taking simple steps to stay safe.

Ask your older loved one if they’re concerned about falling. Many seniors recognize that falling is a risk, but they believe it won’t happen to them or they won’t get hurt—even if they’ve already fallen in the past. If they’re concerned about falling, dizziness, or balance, suggest that they discuss it with their health care provider who can assess their risk and suggest programs or services that could help.

Discuss their current health conditions.

Find out if your older loved one is experiencing any problems with managing their own health. Are they having trouble remembering to take their medications—or are they experiencing side effects? Is it getting more difficult for them to do things they used to do easily? Also make sure they’re taking advantage of all the preventive benefits now offered under Medicare, such as the Annual Wellness visit. Encourage them to speak openly with their health care provider about all of their concerns.

Here are some ways to help prevent falls for your older loved ones:

Make sure to Clean up clutter. 

The easiest way to prevent falls is to keep your home neat and tidy. Remove all clutter, such as stacks of old newspapers and magazines, especially from hallways and staircases.

Avoid loose clothing. 

You want to feel comfortable at home, but very baggy clothes can sometimes make you more likely to fall. Opt for better-fitting and properly hemmed clothing that doesn’t bunch up or drag on the ground.

Install safety devices. 

Bathrooms can be dangerous when wet. A simple non-slip mat can create a more accessible surface for our feet to grip. Grab bars and handrails should also be considered in high-risk areas.

Check your eyes. 

Like everything else, our eyesight changes with aging. Because other health issues can seem more pressing, it is easy for seniors to overlook an annual eye exam. Good eyesight is essential for maintaining balance.

Use an assistance device.  

You might not want to use a walker, but it beats not being able to get around independently. Find one that works for your lifestyle and situation if you need a device.

CONCLUSION

Even with reasonable preventive measures, accidents can happen. If you are living at home alone or your partner can’t get to you quickly in an emergency, consider how you will be able to call 911 if you fall. Keeping a phone in your pocket or wearing an alarm device can be lifesaving.

If you fall, you will likely need to work with an orthopedic doctor and possibly a physical therapist. Together, they can help treat the injury and help you restore mobility.

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

Categories
Uncategorized

Coping With the Decision to Put Your Parent in a Nursing Home​

Coping With the Decision to Put Your Parent in a Nursing Home​

There’s no doubt that wrangling the decision over the most suitable care for your parent can feel like a mammoth task: one in which there are no winners.

The result of this decision often leaves you with a hefty dose of guilt. While outsiders can easily see the logic of the situation, and therefore often see it as a clear-cut decision, you feel the emotion.

It’s difficult to pull out the different contributing factors and assuage the guilt. However, as we’ve learned from our experience of countless adult children dealing with the guilt of putting a parent in a nursing home at our nursing homes in Somerset, there are ways to manage the guilt effectively and come to feel content with your decision.

Source: eastleighcarehomes.co.uk

How to Deal With Guilt Over Nursing Home Placement

Realize that you didn’t cause your loved one’s illnesses or age-related decline. Whether facing age-related issues or a progressive illness like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, your loved one would still have to deal with their declining health whether you continued functioning as their sole caregiver or chose to bring in outside help.

Understand that professional care is often a necessary next step.A higher level of care provides both increased safety and comfort for an aging or ill loved one. Nursing homes don’t accept just any seniors. These long-term care facilities conduct thorough needs assessments of potential residents prior to move-in. If your parent is admitted because they require skilled nursing care and consistent supervision, then a nursing home is the appropriate setting for them. Yes, there are alternatives, such as around-the-clock in-home health care, but they are often cost-prohibitive. (Keep in mind that professional help is also necessary for you to avoid caregiver burnout and have a life and relationships outside of caregiving.)

Take time to acknowledge and appreciate that you are doing the best you can. Being the primary caregiver for a parent is a huge responsibility. We must make decisions about situations that we’ve never encountered before and handle matters that often seem to have no right or wrong answers. Once we’ve made a careful decision, we must endure the consequences. This may mean lots of fast-paced changes or it might mean maintaining the status quo for the time being. You’ve taken on a difficult role and you’re doing your best to make decisions based on the information and resources you currently have.

Learn to understand that you can’t live life for other human beings. You can only help so much. Total control of events isn’t in your hands. There might not be a solution that makes everyone happy or solves every problem. Do your best to handle what is within your abilities, and then let the rest go.

Realistically assess your options. Most elders will be resistant to the idea of entering a nursing home. Long-term care facilities get a bad rap, but they provide a very important service for families. If you come to find that your loved one is being cared for in a substandard facility, or that they may be experiencing abuse or neglect, contact the long-term care ombudsman responsible for your area. 

If your parent is being well cared for, then let the facility do its job. The bulk of your loved one’s care is the nursing home’s responsibility now. Visit often, advocate for them, and do small things to brighten their day and make their life easier, but then move forward with your own life. You’ll have more energy and quality time to devote to all your relationships, and that benefits everyone.

What many family caregivers don’t realize is that your role doesn’t end with nursing home placement. You will still be part of their care team after they move. They will still need you as their advocate. Accept this newly defined caregiver role and the benefits it provides. A commitment to a life of your own will make you a more refreshed caregiver and protect against caregiver burnout. A reputable nursing home will provide your Mom or Dad with the care and engagement that they require. That’s a winning situation for both sides, so put aside the guilt and regret.

Source: agingcare.com

Remember: You’re making sure they’ll be getting the level of care they need.

Moving someone to assisted living means you’ve failed to take care of them. doesn’t

It means you’re making a difficult decision to prioritize their health and safety and get them the level of care they need – a level that may no longer be possible at home over the long term.

Most likely, you’ll still be spending a lot of time with them, checking in with the staff, advocating for their needs, and managing their overall care.

You taking good care of your older adult and you certainly haven’t abandoned them. are

Source: dailycaring.com

How to Help Yourself Adjust to this Change

First, acknowledge that you’re coping with a significant adjustment. While this doesn’t change the situation, it can help to give yourself permission to pause and understand the challenge you’re facing.

Research shows that the caregiver burden can continue after nursing home placement, due to new challenges and demands. This demonstrates that although the placement may have been necessary for the care of the loved one, it won’t automatically “fix” the primary caregiver and make everything okay.

Find little, and perhaps new ways, to express your care and love. Maybe you can bring a newspaper or a flower every day to your loved one.

Identify someone to whom you can express your concerns, both outside of the facility and within it. Communication is important, and most facilities want to know what your concerns are. Learning how to advocate for your loved one is important and necessary, especially when he or she has dementia.

Acknowledge that even though your loved one may not have wanted to live in a facility, there could be some benefits to nursing home care. Although you may feel that nothing can compare with the level of care you gave your loved one at home, keep in mind that the care at a facility may still be good, quality care, and it’s available 24 hours a day. Some people find that their loved one actually improves in a facility because she’s getting the care consistently that family members wanted to provide but just couldn’t maintain effectively at home.

Help your loved one adjust to the facility. Work together to identify meaningful activities and routines for him or her to help facilitate the adjustment.

Consider developing a life story to share important people, events and information with the staff about your loved one.

Remind yourself of the ability now to focus, not only on your loved one’s physical-care needs but also on visiting and building your relationship with him or her.

Most caregivers feel it’s a privilege to care for their loved ones, and don’t want to be relieved of the job of providing the care, even if it’s physically and emotionally taxing. Acknowledging the possible mix of emotions including grief, loss, guilt, and relief, may allow for a healthier adjustment after the nursing home placement of a loved one.

Source: verywellhealth.com

daily activities for alzheimer's

Find the right home and care

One thing that will make you feel less guilty about moving your loved one into a nursing home, is knowing that you put them in the best facility. Don’t wait until the last minute to scout for a nursing home. The more time to make a decision, the less stressful you will be, and the easier it will be to find the right nursing home.

Do your due diligence when selecting a nursing home so that you can find the best one. Nursing homes have improved over time but you can’t always be too sure. So, learn about what to look for in a facility, to make sure your loved one gets the best care. Understand the different nursing home costs and make sure you visit several facilities before you make a decision.

If you are unsure about any of these decisions it’s important to seek out professional aged care advice.

Source: corevalue.com.au

Take care of yourself

Caring for someone can be a full-time job and can have negative effects on your own wellbeing, including your relationships with friends and family. Allow yourself to have a good time, this is likely

what your loved would want you to do. Although it is easy to neglect yourself when you care for a loved one, it is important to remember to look after yourself too.

Source: carehome.co.uk

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

Categories
Uncategorized

Tips and Guide: Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s

Tips and Guide: Caring for someone with Alzheimer's

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care: Help for Family Caregivers

Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia? This guide will help you cope with the challenges at each stage, find the support you need, and reap the rewards of caregiving.

Source: helpguide.org

Make a plan

As Alzheimer’s progresses, you may need more caregiving help, so it’s good to start out thinking long term. You can’t anticipate every situation, but being forward-thinking now will help you respond more quickly and effectively in an emergency.

It’s also key to spread caregiving tasks around your team from the get-go. You can’t do it all.

Build your team. Beyond medical professionals, reach out to friends, family and community resources to form a larger network of caregiving helpmates.

Determine tasks. Ask team members what they’re willing to do to contribute to your loved one’s care. Is someone available to travel to medical appointments? Prepare meals a few times a week? Even if team members live far away , they can handle jobs like ordering prescriptions or paying bills. Encourage them to stay connected to your loved one; dementia can be extremely isolating.

Listen to your loved one. To the extent possible, the person you’re caring for should always participate in discussions about needs and plans. Consider the recipient of your care the most important member of your caregiving team.

Source: aarp.org

Bathing

For many people with Alzheimer’s disease, bathing is a frightening and confusing experience. Elders may think they have showered recently, but in reality their last shower was days or even weeks ago. They can become confused by the process or become afraid of the water and the possibility of falling. Sensitivity to these issues and planning ahead can help make bath time easier on both of you.

Make sure you have all bath products, towels and assistive devices you need set up before bringing your loved one into the bathroom. Draw the bath ahead of time.

Be sensitive to the temperature of the water and the air. Warm up the room beforehand if necessary, and keep extra towels and a robe nearby. Test the water temperature before beginning the bath or shower.

Minimize safety risks by using a hand-held showerhead, a shower bench, grab bars, and nonskid bath mats. Never leave the person alone in the bathtub or shower.

If they need help bathing, move slowly and tell the person what you are going to do step by step. Allow him or her to assist in the process as much as possible.

Bathing may not be necessary every day. A sponge bath can be effective between full showers or baths.

Bathing Tips and Techniques for Dementia Caregivers

Dressing

Getting dressed may not seem very complicated, but Alzheimer’s patients and caregivers face some unique hurdles with this task. Both physical and cognitive decline affect an elder’s ability to recognize when it is time to change soiled clothes, choose appropriate items to wear, and take off/put on clothing and footwear. Minimizing these challenges can make a significant difference in a loved one’s sense of control and independence.

Always set aside extra time before outings and appointments so they can dress themselves as much as they are able without added pressure or having to rush.

Allow them to choose what they want to wear from a limited selection of outfits. If he or she has a favorite outfit or clothing item, consider buying multiples or the same style in a few different colors.

Store some clothes in another room to reduce the number of options they have to choose from. Too many options can overwhelm Alzheimer’s patients who are trying to make a decision. Keep only a couple of outfits in their closet or dresser.

Arrange clothing items in the order they are put on to help guide them through the process.

Choose clothing that is comfortable, easy to get on and off, and easy to care for. Dressing aids and adaptive clothing items featuring elastic waistbands and Velcro closures minimize struggles with finicky fasteners like buttons, zippers and shoe laces.

Personal Care and Dressing Products for Seniors

Eating/Nutrition

Ensuring that your loved one is eating enough nutritious foods and drinking enough fluids is a challenge. People with dementia literally begin to forget that they need to eat and drink. Complicating the issue may be dental problems or medications that decrease appetite or make food taste “funny.” The consequences of poor nutrition are many, including weight loss, irritability, sleeplessness, bladder or bowel problems, and disorientation.

Make meal and snack times part of the daily routine and schedule them around the same time every day. Instead of three big meals, try five or six smaller ones.

Make mealtimes a special time. Try flowers or soft music. Turn off loud radio programs and the TV.

Eating independently should take precedence over eating neatly or with “proper” table manners. Finger foods support independence. Pre-cut and season the food. Try using a straw or a child’s “sippy cup” if holding a glass has become difficult. Provide assistance only when necessary and allow plenty of time for meals.

Sit down and eat with your loved one. Often they will mimic your actions, and it makes the meal more pleasant to share it with someone.

Prepare foods with your loved one in mind. If they have dentures or trouble chewing or swallowing, use soft foods or cut food into bite-size pieces.

If chewing and swallowing are issues, try gently moving the person’s chin in a chewing motion or lightly stroking their throat to encourage them to swallow.

If loss of weight is a problem, offer nutritious high-calorie snacks between meals. Breakfast foods high in carbohydrates are often preferred. On the other hand, if the problem is weight gain, keep high-calorie foods out of sight. Instead, keep handy fresh fruits, veggie trays, and other healthy low-calorie snacks.

Address safety concerns

You’ll need to consider a range of potential hazards, and they’ll change over time. Is it safe for your loved one to drive? Is the recipient of your care prone to falling, or at risk of wandering and getting lost?

You eventually may need to make home modifications and acquire special equipment such as a hospital bed or lift chair. Useful tools also can help prevent wandering and other safety issues common to dementia patients.

Prevent falls . Some basic, low-cost changes include removing trip hazards such as throw rugs, making sure the home is well lit (use automatic nightlights) and installing safety features such as handrails, grab bars and adjustable shower seats.

Stop them from wandering. Six out of 10 people with dementia wander from home at least once, and many do so repeatedly, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. A predictable routine can help avoid disorientation and subsequent excursions. You might also consider installing remote door locks or alarms, or locks far above or below eye level. The Alzheimer’s Association offers a 24-hour nationwide emergency response system, MedicAlert with Wandering Support , for an annual subscription fee.

Anticipate other risks. Dementia brings with it particular worries about self-injury. To lower the risk, keep medications in a locked drawer or cabinet, disable the stove when not in use and lower the water heater temperature to 120 degrees Fahrenheit or less.

Recognize driving dangers. Impaired driving isn’t only a danger to the driver. It can and does harm others. Discuss your concerns with your loved one. If the person is resistant to giving up the car keys, consider asking a physician to weigh in. Be empathetic about the loss of freedom, a common fear.

Source: aarp.org

Toileting and Incontinence Care

As the disease progresses, many people with Alzheimer’s begin to experience toileting difficulties and reduced bladder and bowel control. Incontinence can be upsetting and embarrassing for a senior and difficult for their caregiver to address and manage. Sometimes incontinence is indicative of a physical illness, such as a urinary tract infection (UTI) , so be sure to discuss changes with their doctor as soon as possible.

Practice timed voiding where you create a bathroom schedule and stick to it as closely as possible. For example, take toileting breaks every three hours during the day, and don’t wait for the person to ask. This includes tracking when accidents happen to help plan ways of avoiding them.

Watch for nonverbal cues that an elder may have to go to the bathroom, such as restlessness or pulling at clothes, and act quickly.

To prevent nighttime accidents, limit fluid intake in the evening hours just before bedtime.

Plan ahead for outings. Look up restroom locations, have the senior wear simple, easy-to-remove clothing, and bring an extra set of clothes and incontinence supplies in case of an accident.

Source: agingcare.com

When to seek professional help

A person may require professional help if they need full assistance with daily and personal care activities.

People who have Alzheimer’s disease will require more care as their condition progresses. Caregivers may need assistance in performing physically demanding tasks, such as bathing, moving, or dressing a person.

Caregivers may want to consider seeking professional help if their loved one:

  • requires full assistance with daily and personal care activities
  • loses the ability to walk
  • experiences a seizure
  • unexpectedly loses a significant amount of body weight
  • experiences a fall or other type of injury
  • has periods of anxiety or agitation
  • tends to wander away or get lost

Caregivers who experience adverse health effects, such as chronic stress, fatigue, or depression, may require professional assistance.

Ultimately, it is up to the caregiver and their family to decide when to seek professional help.

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

Categories
Uncategorized

When is it time for Memory Care?

When is it time for Memory Care?

How do you know when it’s the right time?

Knowing when someone with dementia should move into residential or nursing care can be difficult. The main thing to think about is whether your loved one’s needs are met at home; is moving into a care home in their best interest?

When should a person with dementia go into a care home?

If a person’s dementia has progressed far enough that they need more care and support than you can provide, it may be time for them to go into a care home. At this point, they may need 24-hour care.

Dementia is progressive, meaning the person with the condition will require more care and support as time goes on. As your loved one’s condition declines, their needs increase and you may not be able to fully meet these needs despite your best efforts.

This is one example of the number of reasons why it might be time for people with dementia to move into a care home. Other reasons include hospital admissions, worry about your loved one’s safety or their behaviour becomes unmanageable.

There is no cure for dementia and the physical and mental state of a person living with the condition will only worsen. There will never be a perfect time because of the stress and emotional difficulties , but if they need 24-hour supervision and support to stay safe and to ensure good quality of life, the only option may be to move into residential care.

One idea is to write a list of your loved one’s needs and if you are able to support them. For example:

My wife cannot safely go outside on her own – I can only take her outside in the mornings Can I guarantee she won’t leave the house without me? – No, it worries me when I’m not there If you go down the list and notice that you are unable to provide the care and support necessary for your loved one, taking into account your other commitments in life, it may the right time to consider residential care.

If your loved one is unable to live independently and cannot care for themselves anymore, moving into a residential setting will give them the benefit of 24-hour care and support. This will give you peace of mind that your loved one is safe and that they receive the right level of care.

Source: carehome.co.uk

Why It is Beneficial to Start a Memory Care Search Early

From finding and touring memory care residences to finalizing legal documents to managing the memory care move, it will take at least 2 months to sort out the logistics of moving your loved one into memory care. For most families, 3-4 months is more normal. Financial hurdles, like getting covered by Medicaid obtaining VA pension benefits other payment support will take even longer. Even with professional financial planning assistance , it can take 6 months to arrange payment.

If you are considering memory care at an unknown point in the future, then it is probably time to start investigating the process now.

It is highly advantageous to be prepared when the times comes for memory care rather than to be scrambling. The onset of the need for memory care is just as like to be sudden as it is to be gradual. Patient behavior can change dramatically accelerating the need for memory care. However, unexpected changes with primary caregivers is just as likely to initiative the need. Since many caregivers are spouses and elderly themselves and they often push themselves beyond their own limits, caregiver injuries are more common than thought.

Another benefit of starting early is that it can let your loved one actually have a say in the decision. Making the decision in later stages of the disease, when the largest stakeholder can’t communicate well because of symptoms, will only exacerbate emotions including the guilty feelings that often come with this change.

The sooner the preparation begins, the more likely it is to be a positive transition.

Source: dementiacarecentral.com

Concerns About Day-to-Day Care

The most common concern of family caregivers is that their loved one isn’t getting good care. This can be hard to adjust to, because while family caregivers typically care for one person, nursing assistants are usually assigned to eight or more people at a time. And while many have experience and are sensitive to the needs of the people in their care, some have little training.

The best way to deal with any concerns about care is to talk to the staff member involved in a calm way. Most of the time, the issue can be solved this way. If not, talk to the administrator or nursing director.

It’s also a good idea to build good relationships with the care providers. Remember that staff members work hard, have schedules and other pressures, and want to be treated with consideration and respect. Visit the facility often, and share what you know. Tell them what’s being done well, and gently let them know what you’d like to see and when you don’t see it.

Source: webmd.com

Caregiver stress

Caregiving for a loved one with memory care is a 24/7 occupation.

Without engaging in regular respite care , it becomes impossible to sustain the situation. Even with qualified, in-home care providers, those with mid to later stages of memory loss require increasing levels of medical assistance, and the enormity of unceasing tasks is more than almost any household can accommodate.

If you’re approaching, or have already reached, a point where caregiving is all-consuming, it’s time to consider memory care.

Similarly, if you find yourself a member of the “Sandwich Generation” , stuck between an aging parent requiring care, a job and the needs of your own family, memory care is a must or else you’ll quickly go from being a caregiver to needing a caregiver of your own.

As memory loss sets in, so do the abilities to drive a car , make grocery lists, prepare food, remember daily medications, or even remember to eat.

Losing track of days and times has a disastrous effect on the circadian rhythm, contributing to Sundowner’s syndrome, insomnia and other sleep disorders that take on toll on one’s health and well-being.

Physical signs include:

Rapid weight loss

Lack of food in the fridge or cabinets

Evidence of medication not taken (or overtaken)

Neglected personal hygiene

Hunched or sunken posture

Inexplicable bruises, breaks and/or injuries

Unpaid bills and missed appointments

The inability to remember how to get home or where one is going puts patients at risk for injury, getting lost or becoming victims of scams and potentially violent crimes.

Similarly, those with dementia are more prone to being injured at home and are less able to remember how to seek help, forgetting to press a “life alert’ button or how to use the phone to call 911.

If you find yourself worrying about a loved ones’ well-being on a regular basis, the transition to memory care brings peace of mind while simultaneously ensuring s/he is supported, attended to and cared for day-in and day-out.

Source: thememorycenter.com

Finding the right care home for someone with dementia

To find the best care home according to your loved one’s needs, the first thing to do is to request a needs assessment from your local council’s social services.

Your local authority will make recommendations about your loved one’s care and also conduct a financial assessment as they may contribute to some of the costs.

As mentioned earlier, planning in advance will make the choice of care home easier as you will have more information about your loved one’s preferences and wishes.

A residential care home will be able to provide personal care, such as washing and dressing while a nursing home have a qualified nurse on site 24-hours a day.

 

Source: carehome.co.uk

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

Categories
Uncategorized

Myths About Assisted Living

Myths About Assisted Living

How do you know when it’s the right time?

Knowing when someone with dementia should move into residential or nursing care can be difficult. The main thing to think about is whether your loved one’s needs are met at home; is moving into a care home in their best interest?

When should a person with dementia go into a care home?

If a person’s dementia has progressed far enough that they need more care and support than you can provide, it may be time for them to go into a care home. At this point, they may need 24-hour care.

Dementia is progressive, meaning the person with the condition will require more care and support as time goes on. As your loved one’s condition declines, their needs increase and you may not be able to fully meet these needs despite your best efforts.

This is one example of the number of reasons why it might be time for people with dementia to move into a care home. Other reasons include hospital admissions, worry about your loved one’s safety or their behaviour becomes unmanageable.

There is no cure for dementia and the physical and mental state of a person living with the condition will only worsen. There will never be a perfect time because of the stress and emotional difficulties , but if they need 24-hour supervision and support to stay safe and to ensure good quality of life, the only option may be to move into residential care.

One idea is to write a list of your loved one’s needs and if you are able to support them. For example:

My wife cannot safely go outside on her own – I can only take her outside in the mornings Can I guarantee she won’t leave the house without me? – No, it worries me when I’m not there If you go down the list and notice that you are unable to provide the care and support necessary for your loved one, taking into account your other commitments in life, it may the right time to consider residential care.

If your loved one is unable to live independently and cannot care for themselves anymore, moving into a residential setting will give them the benefit of 24-hour care and support. This will give you peace of mind that your loved one is safe and that they receive the right level of care.

Source: carehome.co.uk

Why It is Beneficial to Start a Memory Care Search Early

From finding and touring memory care residences to finalizing legal documents to managing the memory care move, it will take at least 2 months to sort out the logistics of moving your loved one into memory care. For most families, 3-4 months is more normal. Financial hurdles, like getting covered by Medicaid obtaining VA pension benefits other payment support will take even longer. Even with professional financial planning assistance , it can take 6 months to arrange payment.

If you are considering memory care at an unknown point in the future, then it is probably time to start investigating the process now.

It is highly advantageous to be prepared when the times comes for memory care rather than to be scrambling. The onset of the need for memory care is just as like to be sudden as it is to be gradual. Patient behavior can change dramatically accelerating the need for memory care. However, unexpected changes with primary caregivers is just as likely to initiative the need. Since many caregivers are spouses and elderly themselves and they often push themselves beyond their own limits, caregiver injuries are more common than thought.

Another benefit of starting early is that it can let your loved one actually have a say in the decision. Making the decision in later stages of the disease, when the largest stakeholder can’t communicate well because of symptoms, will only exacerbate emotions including the guilty feelings that often come with this change.

The sooner the preparation begins, the more likely it is to be a positive transition.

Source: dementiacarecentral.com

Concerns About Day-to-Day Care

The most common concern of family caregivers is that their loved one isn’t getting good care. This can be hard to adjust to, because while family caregivers typically care for one person, nursing assistants are usually assigned to eight or more people at a time. And while many have experience and are sensitive to the needs of the people in their care, some have little training.

The best way to deal with any concerns about care is to talk to the staff member involved in a calm way. Most of the time, the issue can be solved this way. If not, talk to the administrator or nursing director.

It’s also a good idea to build good relationships with the care providers. Remember that staff members work hard, have schedules and other pressures, and want to be treated with consideration and respect. Visit the facility often, and share what you know. Tell them what’s being done well, and gently let them know what you’d like to see and when you don’t see it.

Source: webmd.com

Caregiver stress

Caregiving for a loved one with memory care is a 24/7 occupation.

Without engaging in regular respite care , it becomes impossible to sustain the situation. Even with qualified, in-home care providers, those with mid to later stages of memory loss require increasing levels of medical assistance, and the enormity of unceasing tasks is more than almost any household can accommodate.

If you’re approaching, or have already reached, a point where caregiving is all-consuming, it’s time to consider memory care.

Similarly, if you find yourself a member of the “Sandwich Generation” , stuck between an aging parent requiring care, a job and the needs of your own family, memory care is a must or else you’ll quickly go from being a caregiver to needing a caregiver of your own.

As memory loss sets in, so do the abilities to drive a car , make grocery lists, prepare food, remember daily medications, or even remember to eat.

Losing track of days and times has a disastrous effect on the circadian rhythm, contributing to Sundowner’s syndrome, insomnia and other sleep disorders that take on toll on one’s health and well-being.

Physical signs include:

Rapid weight loss

Lack of food in the fridge or cabinets

Evidence of medication not taken (or overtaken)

Neglected personal hygiene

Hunched or sunken posture

Inexplicable bruises, breaks and/or injuries

Unpaid bills and missed appointments

The inability to remember how to get home or where one is going puts patients at risk for injury, getting lost or becoming victims of scams and potentially violent crimes.

Similarly, those with dementia are more prone to being injured at home and are less able to remember how to seek help, forgetting to press a “life alert’ button or how to use the phone to call 911.

If you find yourself worrying about a loved ones’ well-being on a regular basis, the transition to memory care brings peace of mind while simultaneously ensuring s/he is supported, attended to and cared for day-in and day-out.

Source: thememorycenter.com

Issues With Abuse or Loss of Valuables

While abuse by professional caregivers is much less common than abuse at home, it can happen. If you think it might be a problem for your loved one, talk with the nursing director or administrator. If you see any type of abuse, report it to the community’s leadership and to your local adult protective services agency.

Source: webmd.com

Finding the right care home for someone with dementia

To find the best care home according to your loved one’s needs, the first thing to do is to request a needs assessment from your local council’s social services.

Your local authority will make recommendations about your loved one’s care and also conduct a financial assessment as they may contribute to some of the costs.

As mentioned earlier, planning in advance will make the choice of care home easier as you will have more information about your loved one’s preferences and wishes.

A residential care home will be able to provide personal care, such as washing and dressing while a nursing home have a qualified nurse on site 24-hours a day.

 

Source: carehome.co.uk

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

Categories
Uncategorized

How To Communicate with a Person with Dementia and Alzheimers

How To Communicate With A Person With Dementia And Alzheimers

Dementia and Alzheimers affect a person’s ability to understand and be understood. Know what you can do to improve communication and lessen frustrations.

Tips for communicating with a person with dementia

Dementia and Alzheimers affect everyone differently so it’s important to communicate in a way that is right for the person. Listen carefully and think about what you’re going to say and how you’ll say it. You can also communicate meaningfully without using spoken words.

Dementia and language

You are here: Tips for communicating with a person with dementia Non-verbal communication and dementia Dementia and sensory impairment: communicating Communicating and dementia – other resources

These tips apply to however the person usually communicates, for example speaking English or signing British Sign Language.

Every person’s experience of dementia is unique, so not every tip may be helpful to the person you care for. Use the tips that you feel will improve communication between you.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Why is communication important?

Communication is a vital part of our lives. It allows us to express who we are and relate to one another. Communication is more than talking and listening – it involves understanding and interpreting.

When a person living with dementia is having trouble expressing themselves or understanding what is being communicated, try these tips to help you stay connected.

Source: alzheimer.ca

1. Use what you know about the person

What does the person like? Use that knowledge to suggest conversation topics or activities they may enjoy.

Nurture the person’s skills and abilities. Focus on what they can do instead of what they can’t.

When the person is making a choice, offer them a couple of options that you know they will like.

Source: alzheimer.ca

2. Reduce distractions

Take note of possible visual or auditory distractions in the person’s environment and minimize them.

Account for any hearing or vision challenges the person may have.

Make eye contact to help focus the person’s attention.

Source: alzheimer.ca

3. Don’t ask a person with short-term memory loss a short-term memory question

A patient and/or loved one can construe even the simplest of conversation starters (“How are you today?”) as a real question, but they honestly don’t know the answer to it. This can be embarrassing and can send them back into a fog they try their best to give an answer that makes sense to them and often produce immediate physical concerns: “I’m having a lot of pain,” for example. A caregiver and/or family member might ask, “What did you have for breakfast?” and the person with memory loss doesn’t remember at all. They might say earnestly, “I haven’t had anything to eat for weeks,” (because they honesty can’t remember the last time they ate). So these are questions to avoid because it causes fear for the person, that they have failed. But there are things you can talk about (which is covered under Communication Do’s.)

Source: training.mmlearn.org

4. Don’t correct them

A patient and/or loved one with memory loss often shows progression in terms of their problems with language. The first sign is finding the right words for things, or word accuracy. The patient and/or loved one may be telling you something about a letter they received, but they can’t get the word “envelope” out, or they may point to a lamp and they can’t quite get the word “lamp” out. Language starts to become disfluent, and it’s difficult for the person to find the specific, right word that they want to express. Over time, their language becomes increasingly vague it is more difficult for them to say something specific. For example, if you ask them what they do on a day-to-day basis, often they’ll say, “Oh, you know, I kind of do the same old thing. I kind of sit around a bit I do house things,” but they can’t offer specific details. This is because their store of language has become affected by the disease. In short, it is very difficult for them to express themselves in any great detail.

Another way to spot decline in language skills is substituting words. For example, they ask you to pass the salt when they meant to say sugar. Stop yourself from nitpicking them on accuracy: “You meant to say the sugar, so here’s the sugar.” Skip that whole conversation. You won’t teach someone how to talk, and, it can be construed as rude to ask that person to try a little harder, because they’re already functioning with half the brain cells. If they point at the sugar and ask for salt, just hand it over as if they said sugar. That’s the most respectful and kind.

People with dementia and/or Alzheimer’s may ask repetitive questions. Usually the question expresses a concern they have. Anyone with a concern that isn’t being addressed will become louder and more persistent. He/she may repeat the same question, because he/she cannot remember that he/she has just asked it, and their concern hasn’t gone away. It is the caregiver’s and/or family member’s responsibility to help soothe the worry. The goal is not to make the question go away it is to make the worry go away for a little while, and then the question may come back. It’s perfectly okay to give the same answer again if it helps to calm the patient and/or loved one. Certain situations throughout the day will trigger repetitive questions that’s to be expected.

Source: training.mmlearn.org

5. Encouraging someone with dementia to communicate

Try to start conversations with the person you’re looking after, especially if you notice that they’re starting fewer conversations themselves. It can help to:

speak clearly and slowly, using short sentences

make eye contact with the person when they’re talking or asking questions

give them time to respond, because they may feel pressured if you try to speed up their answers

encourage them to join in conversations with others, where possible

let them speak for themselves during discussions about their welfare or health issues

try not to patronise them, or ridicule what they say

acknowledge what they have said, even if they do not answer your question, or what they say seems out of context – show that you’ve heard them and encourage them to say more about their answer

give them simple choices – avoid creating complicated choices or options for them

use other ways to communicate – such as rephrasing questions because they cannot answer in the way they used to Alzheimer’s Society

Source: nhs.uk

6. Find the right time of day

The first step to easier telecommunication with someone who has Alzheimer’s disease is to call at the right time of day. That’s when your loved one is rested and most alert.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association , Alzheimer’s disease affects the sleep-wake cycle. I’ve noticed this with my grandma, and I definitely noticed this when I worked at a memory care facility.

Changes include:

sleeping longer

difficulty sleeping at night

daytime naps

drowsiness during the day

Scientists don’t know exactly why this occurs, but believe it’s due to Alzheimer’s-related changes in the brain.

My grandma tends to get out of bed late in the day, around 11 a.m. or noon. She is most alert in the early afternoon, so this is when I call. Since she lives in assisted living, I also avoid calling at mealtimes or when there are group activities.

Instead of trying to change your loved one’s sleep cycle or schedule, recognize the impact of their disease and work with them.

Know that finding the best time of day to call might take some trial and error, and it might change as their disease progresses. Talking to caregivers or keeping a calendar of symptoms can help you find the best time to call.

Source: healthline.com

7. Simplify your language

It’s easier said than done, but one of the best things you can do to aid communication is simplifying your language.

According to Bennett, “Usually we add a lot of fluff and storytelling to our main point, but individuals with dementia might get lost in all that fluff.” Try using as few words as possible with simple, common phrases. Cut out modifiers and shorten your sentences. Bennett even recommends pairing visual supports like pictures or props over video chat to get your point across.

I’ve found that avoiding open-ended questions can help.

I ask yes or no questions or give two options. This can help prevent overwhelm and limit the cognitive resources required to communicate, saving energy for the rest of the conversation.

Source: healthline.com

The Power of Memory

The brain works in funny ways. While someone with dementia and/or Alzheimer’s may not be able to recall what he/she had for breakfast that morning, he/she may remember people, places, and stories from the distant past. Remember: ask the patient and/or loved one to share favorite stories from childhood family members may even be surprised to learn something new.

Also keep in mind that even though the patient and/or loved one is losing his/her memory, he/she still has feelings and emotions. Humor offers a great way to connect, and everyone can reap the mood-boosting benefits.

Communicating with a patient and/or loved one with memory loss has its challenges, but these proven techniques can help caregivers whether you are a professional or a family member overcome the barriers in order to continue to connect.

Source: training.mmlearn.org

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

Categories
Uncategorized

How To Stay Connected With Seniors You Can’t Visit​

How To Stay Connected With Seniors You Can't Visit

The social distancing that keeps our residents safe may be hard on you. Separation leaves some people feeling lonely, anxious, or out of touch. So, we’ve mustered our creativity to help families stay connected with the seniors they can’t visit.

The following infographic provides a summary of our suggestions. Scroll down for more details.

We offer more details and ideas below.

While we’ve tailored our suggestions to meet Care Haven’s safety guidelines, they may be useful to others with at-risk friends or family members. Feel free to share!

Source: carehavenhomes.com

Call Frequently

“Don’t underestimate the power of a phone call,” says Jennifer L. FitzPatrick, a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and author of “ Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing the Stress of Caring for Your Loved One .” But because many of us aren’t doing much outside the home these days, it may be hard to come up with topics to discuss. FitzPatrick suggests reading a book or watching a favorite TV show or movie together over the phone. You could also do fill-in-the-blank stories or use “table topics”-type questions to spark conversation.

Plan a window visit

You’ve likely seen viral photos of “window visits” people are having with senior family members at their homes or outside of senior care facilities. During these visits, family members stay outside, but they chat with their loved ones on the phone or bring handmade signs with messages. “It feels much more like a normal visit when they can see their loved ones,” says Goyer.

In addition to window visits, families are also putting a social distancing spin on other types of house calls. “Caregivers have told me their loved ones sit on their porch and family and friends sit on a lawn chair in the yard far away and they visit that way, or from a car,” Goyer explains. “My cousin’s children make chalk drawings in my aunt and uncle’s driveway (their grandparents), and they sit on the porch and watch them draw and can communicate from a safe distance.”

Source: care.com

Between Virtual Visits, Stay In Touch With Seniors The Old-Fashioned Way

Older adults learned to stay connected between visits through the fine art of letter writing. Let’s face it: we all love getting cards and notes via snail mail.

Don’t be intimidated, staring at that empty sheet of paper. A short note even a postcard will do. Just include

A salutation (“Dear ____,”)

3 or 4 sentences

The closing (“Love,”)

Most important, your signature legible, with an identifier to help if a caregiver needs to read it (Your granddaughter Joan Your son Jon Your old friend June George, your friend from church Gina, your neighbor from Brookside)

Feel free to add a heart, smiley face or doodle, too. You can even write several notes or cards at the same time and then mail them days or a week apart.

Snail mail: that’s all it takes to stay connected with seniors when you can’t visit.

Speaking of mail, we appreciate it when you send all correspondence to our office, where we can sanitize it before redelivery.

Source: carehavenhomes.com

 

Set up a family Video Conference

FaceTime and video calls aren’t just for young people. If the senior in your life is in a nursing home or assisted living and doesn’t have their own equipment, chances are good the staff can help. At The Falls Home, an assisted living facility in Montour Falls, N.Y., administrator Julie Everhart says they will arrange video calls through the front desk so that residents can stay connected. “Our staff will then coordinate a quiet location in order to give the families their privacy,” she says.

By using a service like Zoom, you can involve multiple parties, and even make it a virtual happy hour or lunch. “Everyone in the family can bring a beverage or meal to their computer and catch up,” FitzPatrick says. And if there’s a special occasion, take a video and send clips to your loved ones even better if you can arrange a video call to sing “Happy Birthday” or “meet” a new grandbaby.

“Several months ago, my husband and I streamed a party we had for our newborn son for his ill grandfather,” says Nicole Arzt, a marriage and family therapist based in Orange County, California. “While he wasn’t there to attend the event, he was able to hear everyone’s voices and feel like he was part of the experience.”

Source: northwesternmutual.com

Make a safe in-person visit

“If you live near your older loved ones, drive to their house, sit outside and make a phone call,” FitzPatrick recommends. “You can wave and sing ‘Happy Birthday’ so your parent can see you.” You can even leave a cake on the front porch no contact is needed. Even if it’s not a special occasion, bring the kids and even your pets by to say hi through the window. They can draw pictures or dress in funny costumes to bring a smile to their grandparent’s face.

Source: northwesternmutual.com

Take a virtual vacation

Sure, most resorts, museums, and other fun destinations are closed to the public, but you can still explore the world together from the safety of your own home. “For example,” says Sarafan, “why not give them a call and take a tour of an online museum together?” You can find free online virtual tours of destinations like Yellowstone National Park Guggenheim Museum in New York City, the Louvre in Paris, and even Mars. As long as your senior loved one has access to a smart device, they’ll be able to follow along at your chosen destination. Sarafan says Home Care Assistance has also created a Life Enrichment Guide with additional virtual activity ideas for seniors and their families.

Source: care.com

 

Enlist caregivers’ help

If your loved one has limited abilities, lives in a senior care facility, or has an in-home care provider, see what their caregivers can do to assist them in staying in touch. “Many facilities are purchasing tablets and having staff take them to residents’ rooms periodically to video chat with their families,” Goyer says. “This is particularly important for residents who are unable to manage it by themselves.” If you’re going the non-electronic route, Sarafan adds that caregivers can also be asked to assist with letters and cards so your loved one can provide you with regular updates. “One thing many of our Home Care Assistance care team members do is write handwritten notes to clients, family members, and community partners,” she explains. “A caregiver can easily help and even write letters for the older adult should they need help.”

Source: care.com

A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words (Which Is Many, Many Visits!)

Consider creating an album filled with pictures of family members or recalling special memories. Take the opportunity to scan and upload treasured wedding photos or vacation pictures, thereby preserving a digital copy. (You can always use them later in other albums as well!) Our caregivers appreciate it if you also add text to photo books, identifying both people and places. Then we can help your loved ones share their memories.

Source: carehavenhomes.com

 

BE CONSISTENT

However you choose to reach out, make sure it happens on a regular basis, Artz says. Call every Sunday or at a regularly scheduled time, and then make every effort to follow through, as your family member could very well plan their whole day around it.

“Many of us are struggling with social distancing all of a sudden, but it’s important to remember that a lot of older adults are isolated already and have been unintentionally socially distancing for quite a while,” FitzPatrick says. “Use this time as a lesson to plan how you will engage with them in person more frequently once this temporary unprecedented time in history is over.”

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

Categories
Uncategorized

Memory Care Activities at Braley Care Homes

Memory Care Activities at Braley Care Homes

Host: Chris Braley with Braley Care Homes is here today. Thanks so much for stopping by. 

Chris: Thank you! 

H: Yeah, okay now you know this has been a tough year for everyone but especially our older loved ones but i hear you all been doing a lot of fun activities even a snowball fight. Tell us what’s going on.

C: Yeah, you know it’s important to keep everybody active and have some fun. And we’ll try to do activities that are spontaneous and kind of related to the weather and stuff that’s going on – seasonal.

So of course as you know uh last week we had a bit of snow and ice in our area uh so we did a snowball fight with the residents and so i got in the center of an area in our living room and the residents kind of we got different snowballs and they just kind of threw it at me and had fun. 

H: I bet they really enjoyed it.

C: They did yeah. 

H: And then we were showing a picture going into the commercial break was that a carnival what else do you do? 

C: Yeah yes actually just yesterday um you got an exclusive we don’t even have it on our Facebook (oh wow) we did a carnival um and i just did some carnival kind of foods and then we did we did a wheelchair race and then we we did this thing where they put shaving cream on my head and the shower cap and so the resins try to throw popcorn uh and they had a blast I mean it was I don’t know if you have some pictures of that but it was pretty. 

H: Yeah this looks like maybe you all had a Valentine’s party.

C: Yep yeah and they had their own message kind of their message to being a valentine and.. 

H: Yeah and maybe that’s carnival 

C: That’s part of the carnival.

H: Okay yeah well you know why do you think it’s so important to for the residents to engage in these fun activities? 

C: well it i think you know activities are just as important as any other aspect whether you’re looking at medications or nutrition um it’s food for the brain yeah and so they need they need that that mind and body stimulation there’s a lot of research that has shown that with that correct kind of activities they can improve their their mental status they can improve levels of agitation levels of depression, flexibility and all those aspects. 

H: So is this something that you all because you know right from the science aspect of it and then of course seeing the smiles on their faces is this something you all are going to continue doing throughout the year or is it just through the winter? 

C: Oh no no we do this all you know all year round 

H: Yeah that is great um and you’re a good sport too if you’re letting them throw snowballs at you anything to get a laugh.

C: that’s true that’s true 

H: So how important is it you talked about that but what about our viewers at home maybe they don’t have a loved one in a care facility like yours but they have someone they’re taking care of at home any advice for them what are some activities that you’ve seen that would work.

C: Yeah it’s really looking at the individual and where they are in their stage of dementia and understanding their history what they enjoy what their skill set is and then trying to design an activity program around that certainly things like crossword puzzles and other kinds of puzzles are good for the for the mind but you know you can get creative and if they’re later stage you know an activity that’s been very effective for us with certain residents a baby doll and it’s very soothing relaxing it takes them back to that time period when perhaps they were caring for their child or their grandchild and those are the emotions and feelings that you’re trying to get for them within an activity yeah um is that they’re feeling that self-respect and that they’re taking care of taking care of someone. 

H: I get it now if folks at home want to contact you all maybe come talk to you or i guess do an online tour and discuss how do they get in touch with you?

C: Sure they can go to our website which is braleycarehomes.com they can certainly give us a phone call at 304-767-4033 and we can schedule a time for them to come down 

H: Great sounds good we’ll keep having fun and being a good sport with them thank you all righty thanks a lot Chris Braley with Braley Care.

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

© 2020 Braley Care Homes, Inc.

Categories
Uncategorized

COVID Vaccine Rollout at Braley Care Homes

Chris Braley discusses getting vaccines distributed to memory care and alzheimer’s patients and residents at Braley Care Homes.

Host: Hi Welcome back! you know assisted living has taken a huge hit during the pandemic. Today we have Chris Braley, the owner of Braley Care Homes here to talk about how you all maneuvered and adapted during this time because you have some very special people that you all take care of and that gives you an extra obstacle to deal with but you all have gotten everyone vaccinated?

Chris: Yes, we have. We had the second dose last week.

H: Wow, that’s gotta give you all a lot of relief

C: oh, ya. Ya, it’s been trying time to get to that point and absolutely, we had webinars done by the West Virginia Health care association that helped us get logistically prepared for it

H: I remember the last time you were here talking to us. You all were hoping to get the first vaccine and now you’ve gotten both vaccines in your memory care residents there. So, how did it go?

C: It went well. We had a great staff turnout. I think we only had maybe 15% of staff that didn’t do it and about 85% of our staff, all of our alzheimer’s care residents were vaccinated. The families are very happy of course and excited because the next thing now will be when can families come visit?

Is there a timeline yet for that? That’s the million-dollar question!

Yeah, and I think that was really the big goal. We wanted to get to this point where we could get everybody vaccinated where there I think ah, we’re gonna be slowly open up some visitation here real soon

H: Oh, that’s good. How can the families find out when that will happen?

C: They can contact me and they have when we have enough talked and I think we’re looking at probably within the next month. One thing that I’ve told them I’m looking at is they’ve heard about the South African variant.

Yeah, with the virus, just kinda keep an eye on, you know what’s going on with that.

I know we had the Moderna vaccine and we know they’re doing some research with that particular issue

H: Is that the vaccine you all got?

C: Yes.

H: Did everyone do okay with it?

C: There were some side effects. The second dose I think affected really probably more staff than our residents. But it only lasted about 24 hours and everybody was fine after that.

H: We’ve heard a lot about that. That second dose. It makes you feel a little rougher than the first dose but those are important people your staff workers because they’re taking care a lot of loved ones.

Okay, so what about, do you all have openings or vacancies?

H: If someone watching today. Maybe they heard about your facility and they would like to get a loved one there for memory care or alzheimer’s or dementia care services. But these are still very, you know, scary times for a lot of people. How do they go about visiting and finding out more about it.

C: Right, uh, it is very scary and it is a little different of course from what it used to be. But they would just contact me and we would set up a time. I can’t give an actual tour at this moment but they can go on to our website and they can set up a time with me and I can meet with them in our lobby and kind of go over some things to get that ready. We do have some openings right now

H: Oh, that’s good!

Um, and it looks like we have your phone number on our screen right now as well.

If people want to call and get the ball rolling on that process to a take the virtual tour and come in and talk to you in the lobby there

C: Absolutely.

H: Well, good. so you feel probably a sigh of relief now that the vaccine everyone’s gotten vaccinated or at least the majority there

C: Oh, it’s been nerve-wracking. You know for quite a while and I really want to thank again the West Virginia Health Care Association and Assured Care Pharmacy who we partnered with to help get everything done. It helped tremendously to get logistically everything going to get that done

H: I bet that was a big undertaking

C: Ya and there was concern and fear in the beginning during the webinars

that residents may not be in that first wave of vaccinations which is very scary. But you know Governor Justice did in fact do that where some states didn’t and there are some residents long-term care that were not in that first wave in other states

H: Right, alright, well

Chris Braley, owner of Braley Care Homes

Thanks for you all are doing there and for stopping by and sharing how things are going now that you all have gotten vaccinated.

C: Thank you for having me!

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

© 2020 Braley Care Homes, Inc.