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How To Communicate with a Person with Dementia and Alzheimers

How To Communicate With A Person With Dementia And Alzheimers

Dementia and Alzheimers affect a person’s ability to understand and be understood. Know what you can do to improve communication and lessen frustrations.

Tips for communicating with a person with dementia

Dementia and Alzheimers affect everyone differently so it’s important to communicate in a way that is right for the person. Listen carefully and think about what you’re going to say and how you’ll say it. You can also communicate meaningfully without using spoken words.

Dementia and language

You are here: Tips for communicating with a person with dementia Non-verbal communication and dementia Dementia and sensory impairment: communicating Communicating and dementia – other resources

These tips apply to however the person usually communicates, for example speaking English or signing British Sign Language.

Every person’s experience of dementia is unique, so not every tip may be helpful to the person you care for. Use the tips that you feel will improve communication between you.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Why is communication important?

Communication is a vital part of our lives. It allows us to express who we are and relate to one another. Communication is more than talking and listening – it involves understanding and interpreting.

When a person living with dementia is having trouble expressing themselves or understanding what is being communicated, try these tips to help you stay connected.

Source: alzheimer.ca

1. Use what you know about the person

What does the person like? Use that knowledge to suggest conversation topics or activities they may enjoy.

Nurture the person’s skills and abilities. Focus on what they can do instead of what they can’t.

When the person is making a choice, offer them a couple of options that you know they will like.

Source: alzheimer.ca

2. Reduce distractions

Take note of possible visual or auditory distractions in the person’s environment and minimize them.

Account for any hearing or vision challenges the person may have.

Make eye contact to help focus the person’s attention.

Source: alzheimer.ca

3. Don’t ask a person with short-term memory loss a short-term memory question

A patient and/or loved one can construe even the simplest of conversation starters (“How are you today?”) as a real question, but they honestly don’t know the answer to it. This can be embarrassing and can send them back into a fog they try their best to give an answer that makes sense to them and often produce immediate physical concerns: “I’m having a lot of pain,” for example. A caregiver and/or family member might ask, “What did you have for breakfast?” and the person with memory loss doesn’t remember at all. They might say earnestly, “I haven’t had anything to eat for weeks,” (because they honesty can’t remember the last time they ate). So these are questions to avoid because it causes fear for the person, that they have failed. But there are things you can talk about (which is covered under Communication Do’s.)

Source: training.mmlearn.org

4. Don’t correct them

A patient and/or loved one with memory loss often shows progression in terms of their problems with language. The first sign is finding the right words for things, or word accuracy. The patient and/or loved one may be telling you something about a letter they received, but they can’t get the word “envelope” out, or they may point to a lamp and they can’t quite get the word “lamp” out. Language starts to become disfluent, and it’s difficult for the person to find the specific, right word that they want to express. Over time, their language becomes increasingly vague it is more difficult for them to say something specific. For example, if you ask them what they do on a day-to-day basis, often they’ll say, “Oh, you know, I kind of do the same old thing. I kind of sit around a bit I do house things,” but they can’t offer specific details. This is because their store of language has become affected by the disease. In short, it is very difficult for them to express themselves in any great detail.

Another way to spot decline in language skills is substituting words. For example, they ask you to pass the salt when they meant to say sugar. Stop yourself from nitpicking them on accuracy: “You meant to say the sugar, so here’s the sugar.” Skip that whole conversation. You won’t teach someone how to talk, and, it can be construed as rude to ask that person to try a little harder, because they’re already functioning with half the brain cells. If they point at the sugar and ask for salt, just hand it over as if they said sugar. That’s the most respectful and kind.

People with dementia and/or Alzheimer’s may ask repetitive questions. Usually the question expresses a concern they have. Anyone with a concern that isn’t being addressed will become louder and more persistent. He/she may repeat the same question, because he/she cannot remember that he/she has just asked it, and their concern hasn’t gone away. It is the caregiver’s and/or family member’s responsibility to help soothe the worry. The goal is not to make the question go away it is to make the worry go away for a little while, and then the question may come back. It’s perfectly okay to give the same answer again if it helps to calm the patient and/or loved one. Certain situations throughout the day will trigger repetitive questions that’s to be expected.

Source: training.mmlearn.org

5. Encouraging someone with dementia to communicate

Try to start conversations with the person you’re looking after, especially if you notice that they’re starting fewer conversations themselves. It can help to:

speak clearly and slowly, using short sentences

make eye contact with the person when they’re talking or asking questions

give them time to respond, because they may feel pressured if you try to speed up their answers

encourage them to join in conversations with others, where possible

let them speak for themselves during discussions about their welfare or health issues

try not to patronise them, or ridicule what they say

acknowledge what they have said, even if they do not answer your question, or what they say seems out of context – show that you’ve heard them and encourage them to say more about their answer

give them simple choices – avoid creating complicated choices or options for them

use other ways to communicate – such as rephrasing questions because they cannot answer in the way they used to Alzheimer’s Society

Source: nhs.uk

6. Find the right time of day

The first step to easier telecommunication with someone who has Alzheimer’s disease is to call at the right time of day. That’s when your loved one is rested and most alert.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association , Alzheimer’s disease affects the sleep-wake cycle. I’ve noticed this with my grandma, and I definitely noticed this when I worked at a memory care facility.

Changes include:

sleeping longer

difficulty sleeping at night

daytime naps

drowsiness during the day

Scientists don’t know exactly why this occurs, but believe it’s due to Alzheimer’s-related changes in the brain.

My grandma tends to get out of bed late in the day, around 11 a.m. or noon. She is most alert in the early afternoon, so this is when I call. Since she lives in assisted living, I also avoid calling at mealtimes or when there are group activities.

Instead of trying to change your loved one’s sleep cycle or schedule, recognize the impact of their disease and work with them.

Know that finding the best time of day to call might take some trial and error, and it might change as their disease progresses. Talking to caregivers or keeping a calendar of symptoms can help you find the best time to call.

Source: healthline.com

7. Simplify your language

It’s easier said than done, but one of the best things you can do to aid communication is simplifying your language.

According to Bennett, “Usually we add a lot of fluff and storytelling to our main point, but individuals with dementia might get lost in all that fluff.” Try using as few words as possible with simple, common phrases. Cut out modifiers and shorten your sentences. Bennett even recommends pairing visual supports like pictures or props over video chat to get your point across.

I’ve found that avoiding open-ended questions can help.

I ask yes or no questions or give two options. This can help prevent overwhelm and limit the cognitive resources required to communicate, saving energy for the rest of the conversation.

 

Source: healthline.com

The Power of Memory

The brain works in funny ways. While someone with dementia and/or Alzheimer’s may not be able to recall what he/she had for breakfast that morning, he/she may remember people, places, and stories from the distant past. Remember: ask the patient and/or loved one to share favorite stories from childhood family members may even be surprised to learn something new.

Also keep in mind that even though the patient and/or loved one is losing his/her memory, he/she still has feelings and emotions. Humor offers a great way to connect, and everyone can reap the mood-boosting benefits.

Communicating with a patient and/or loved one with memory loss has its challenges, but these proven techniques can help caregivers whether you are a professional or a family member overcome the barriers in order to continue to connect.

 

Source: training.mmlearn.org

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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How To Stay Connected With Seniors You Can’t Visit​

How To Stay Connected With Seniors You Can't Visit

The social distancing that keeps our residents safe may be hard on you. Separation leaves some people feeling lonely, anxious, or out of touch. So, we’ve mustered our creativity to help families stay connected with the seniors they can’t visit.

The following infographic provides a summary of our suggestions. Scroll down for more details.

We offer more details and ideas below.

While we’ve tailored our suggestions to meet Care Haven’s safety guidelines, they may be useful to others with at-risk friends or family members. Feel free to share!

Source: carehavenhomes.com

Call Frequently

“Don’t underestimate the power of a phone call,” says Jennifer L. FitzPatrick, a gerontology instructor at Johns Hopkins University and author of “ Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing the Stress of Caring for Your Loved One .” But because many of us aren’t doing much outside the home these days, it may be hard to come up with topics to discuss. FitzPatrick suggests reading a book or watching a favorite TV show or movie together over the phone. You could also do fill-in-the-blank stories or use “table topics”-type questions to spark conversation.

Plan a window visit

You’ve likely seen viral photos of “window visits” people are having with senior family members at their homes or outside of senior care facilities. During these visits, family members stay outside, but they chat with their loved ones on the phone or bring handmade signs with messages. “It feels much more like a normal visit when they can see their loved ones,” says Goyer.

In addition to window visits, families are also putting a social distancing spin on other types of house calls. “Caregivers have told me their loved ones sit on their porch and family and friends sit on a lawn chair in the yard far away and they visit that way, or from a car,” Goyer explains. “My cousin’s children make chalk drawings in my aunt and uncle’s driveway (their grandparents), and they sit on the porch and watch them draw and can communicate from a safe distance.”

Source: care.com

Between Virtual Visits, Stay In Touch With Seniors The Old-Fashioned Way

Older adults learned to stay connected between visits through the fine art of letter writing. Let’s face it: we all love getting cards and notes via snail mail.

Don’t be intimidated, staring at that empty sheet of paper. A short note even a postcard will do. Just include

A salutation (“Dear ____,”)

3 or 4 sentences

The closing (“Love,”)

Most important, your signature legible, with an identifier to help if a caregiver needs to read it (Your granddaughter Joan Your son Jon Your old friend June George, your friend from church Gina, your neighbor from Brookside)

Feel free to add a heart, smiley face or doodle, too. You can even write several notes or cards at the same time and then mail them days or a week apart.

Snail mail: that’s all it takes to stay connected with seniors when you can’t visit.

Speaking of mail, we appreciate it when you send all correspondence to our office, where we can sanitize it before redelivery.

Source: carehavenhomes.com

 

Set up a family Video Conference

FaceTime and video calls aren’t just for young people. If the senior in your life is in a nursing home or assisted living and doesn’t have their own equipment, chances are good the staff can help. At The Falls Home, an assisted living facility in Montour Falls, N.Y., administrator Julie Everhart says they will arrange video calls through the front desk so that residents can stay connected. “Our staff will then coordinate a quiet location in order to give the families their privacy,” she says.

By using a service like Zoom, you can involve multiple parties, and even make it a virtual happy hour or lunch. “Everyone in the family can bring a beverage or meal to their computer and catch up,” FitzPatrick says. And if there’s a special occasion, take a video and send clips to your loved ones even better if you can arrange a video call to sing “Happy Birthday” or “meet” a new grandbaby.

“Several months ago, my husband and I streamed a party we had for our newborn son for his ill grandfather,” says Nicole Arzt, a marriage and family therapist based in Orange County, California. “While he wasn’t there to attend the event, he was able to hear everyone’s voices and feel like he was part of the experience.”

Source: northwesternmutual.com

Make a safe in-person visit

“If you live near your older loved ones, drive to their house, sit outside and make a phone call,” FitzPatrick recommends. “You can wave and sing ‘Happy Birthday’ so your parent can see you.” You can even leave a cake on the front porch no contact is needed. Even if it’s not a special occasion, bring the kids and even your pets by to say hi through the window. They can draw pictures or dress in funny costumes to bring a smile to their grandparent’s face.

Source: northwesternmutual.com

Take a virtual vacation

Sure, most resorts, museums, and other fun destinations are closed to the public, but you can still explore the world together from the safety of your own home. “For example,” says Sarafan, “why not give them a call and take a tour of an online museum together?” You can find free online virtual tours of destinations like Yellowstone National Park Guggenheim Museum in New York City, the Louvre in Paris, and even Mars. As long as your senior loved one has access to a smart device, they’ll be able to follow along at your chosen destination. Sarafan says Home Care Assistance has also created a Life Enrichment Guide with additional virtual activity ideas for seniors and their families.

Source: care.com

 

Enlist caregivers’ help

If your loved one has limited abilities, lives in a senior care facility, or has an in-home care provider, see what their caregivers can do to assist them in staying in touch. “Many facilities are purchasing tablets and having staff take them to residents’ rooms periodically to video chat with their families,” Goyer says. “This is particularly important for residents who are unable to manage it by themselves.” If you’re going the non-electronic route, Sarafan adds that caregivers can also be asked to assist with letters and cards so your loved one can provide you with regular updates. “One thing many of our Home Care Assistance care team members do is write handwritten notes to clients, family members, and community partners,” she explains. “A caregiver can easily help and even write letters for the older adult should they need help.”

Source: care.com

A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words (Which Is Many, Many Visits!)

Consider creating an album filled with pictures of family members or recalling special memories. Take the opportunity to scan and upload treasured wedding photos or vacation pictures, thereby preserving a digital copy. (You can always use them later in other albums as well!) Our caregivers appreciate it if you also add text to photo books, identifying both people and places. Then we can help your loved ones share their memories.

Source: carehavenhomes.com

 

BE CONSISTENT

However you choose to reach out, make sure it happens on a regular basis, Artz says. Call every Sunday or at a regularly scheduled time, and then make every effort to follow through, as your family member could very well plan their whole day around it.

“Many of us are struggling with social distancing all of a sudden, but it’s important to remember that a lot of older adults are isolated already and have been unintentionally socially distancing for quite a while,” FitzPatrick says. “Use this time as a lesson to plan how you will engage with them in person more frequently once this temporary unprecedented time in history is over.”

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Memory Care Activities at Braley Care Homes

Memory Care Activities at Braley Care Homes

Host: Chris Braley with Braley Care Homes is here today. Thanks so much for stopping by. 

Chris: Thank you! 

H: Yeah, okay now you know this has been a tough year for everyone but especially our older loved ones but i hear you all been doing a lot of fun activities even a snowball fight. Tell us what’s going on.

C: Yeah, you know it’s important to keep everybody active and have some fun. And we’ll try to do activities that are spontaneous and kind of related to the weather and stuff that’s going on – seasonal.

So of course as you know uh last week we had a bit of snow and ice in our area uh so we did a snowball fight with the residents and so i got in the center of an area in our living room and the residents kind of we got different snowballs and they just kind of threw it at me and had fun. 

H: I bet they really enjoyed it.

C: They did yeah. 

H: And then we were showing a picture going into the commercial break was that a carnival what else do you do? 

C: Yeah yes actually just yesterday um you got an exclusive we don’t even have it on our Facebook (oh wow) we did a carnival um and i just did some carnival kind of foods and then we did we did a wheelchair race and then we we did this thing where they put shaving cream on my head and the shower cap and so the resins try to throw popcorn uh and they had a blast I mean it was I don’t know if you have some pictures of that but it was pretty. 

H: Yeah this looks like maybe you all had a Valentine’s party.

C: Yep yeah and they had their own message kind of their message to being a valentine and.. 

H: Yeah and maybe that’s carnival 

C: That’s part of the carnival.

H: Okay yeah well you know why do you think it’s so important to for the residents to engage in these fun activities? 

C: well it i think you know activities are just as important as any other aspect whether you’re looking at medications or nutrition um it’s food for the brain yeah and so they need they need that that mind and body stimulation there’s a lot of research that has shown that with that correct kind of activities they can improve their their mental status they can improve levels of agitation levels of depression, flexibility and all those aspects. 

H: So is this something that you all because you know right from the science aspect of it and then of course seeing the smiles on their faces is this something you all are going to continue doing throughout the year or is it just through the winter? 

C: Oh no no we do this all you know all year round 

H: Yeah that is great um and you’re a good sport too if you’re letting them throw snowballs at you anything to get a laugh.

C: that’s true that’s true 

H: So how important is it you talked about that but what about our viewers at home maybe they don’t have a loved one in a care facility like yours but they have someone they’re taking care of at home any advice for them what are some activities that you’ve seen that would work.

C: Yeah it’s really looking at the individual and where they are in their stage of dementia and understanding their history what they enjoy what their skill set is and then trying to design an activity program around that certainly things like crossword puzzles and other kinds of puzzles are good for the for the mind but you know you can get creative and if they’re later stage you know an activity that’s been very effective for us with certain residents a baby doll and it’s very soothing relaxing it takes them back to that time period when perhaps they were caring for their child or their grandchild and those are the emotions and feelings that you’re trying to get for them within an activity yeah um is that they’re feeling that self-respect and that they’re taking care of taking care of someone. 

H: I get it now if folks at home want to contact you all maybe come talk to you or i guess do an online tour and discuss how do they get in touch with you?

C: Sure they can go to our website which is braleycarehomes.com they can certainly give us a phone call at 304-767-4033 and we can schedule a time for them to come down 

H: Great sounds good we’ll keep having fun and being a good sport with them thank you all righty thanks a lot Chris Braley with Braley Care.

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

© 2020 Braley Care Homes, Inc.

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COVID Vaccine Rollout at Braley Care Homes

Chris Braley discusses getting vaccines distributed to memory care and alzheimer’s patients and residents at Braley Care Homes.

Host: Hi Welcome back! you know assisted living has taken a huge hit during the pandemic. Today we have Chris Braley, the owner of Braley Care Homes here to talk about how you all maneuvered and adapted during this time because you have some very special people that you all take care of and that gives you an extra obstacle to deal with but you all have gotten everyone vaccinated?

Chris: Yes, we have. We had the second dose last week.

H: Wow, that’s gotta give you all a lot of relief

C: oh, ya. Ya, it’s been trying time to get to that point and absolutely, we had webinars done by the West Virginia Health care association that helped us get logistically prepared for it

H: I remember the last time you were here talking to us. You all were hoping to get the first vaccine and now you’ve gotten both vaccines in your memory care residents there. So, how did it go?

C: It went well. We had a great staff turnout. I think we only had maybe 15% of staff that didn’t do it and about 85% of our staff, all of our alzheimer’s care residents were vaccinated. The families are very happy of course and excited because the next thing now will be when can families come visit?

Is there a timeline yet for that? That’s the million-dollar question!

Yeah, and I think that was really the big goal. We wanted to get to this point where we could get everybody vaccinated where there I think ah, we’re gonna be slowly open up some visitation here real soon

H: Oh, that’s good. How can the families find out when that will happen?

C: They can contact me and they have when we have enough talked and I think we’re looking at probably within the next month. One thing that I’ve told them I’m looking at is they’ve heard about the South African variant.

Yeah, with the virus, just kinda keep an eye on, you know what’s going on with that.

I know we had the Moderna vaccine and we know they’re doing some research with that particular issue

H: Is that the vaccine you all got?

C: Yes.

H: Did everyone do okay with it?

C: There were some side effects. The second dose I think affected really probably more staff than our residents. But it only lasted about 24 hours and everybody was fine after that.

H: We’ve heard a lot about that. That second dose. It makes you feel a little rougher than the first dose but those are important people your staff workers because they’re taking care a lot of loved ones.

Okay, so what about, do you all have openings or vacancies?

H: If someone watching today. Maybe they heard about your facility and they would like to get a loved one there for memory care or alzheimer’s or dementia care services. But these are still very, you know, scary times for a lot of people. How do they go about visiting and finding out more about it.

C: Right, uh, it is very scary and it is a little different of course from what it used to be. But they would just contact me and we would set up a time. I can’t give an actual tour at this moment but they can go on to our website and they can set up a time with me and I can meet with them in our lobby and kind of go over some things to get that ready. We do have some openings right now

H: Oh, that’s good!

Um, and it looks like we have your phone number on our screen right now as well.

If people want to call and get the ball rolling on that process to a take the virtual tour and come in and talk to you in the lobby there

C: Absolutely.

H: Well, good. so you feel probably a sigh of relief now that the vaccine everyone’s gotten vaccinated or at least the majority there

C: Oh, it’s been nerve-wracking. You know for quite a while and I really want to thank again the West Virginia Health Care Association and Assured Care Pharmacy who we partnered with to help get everything done. It helped tremendously to get logistically everything going to get that done

H: I bet that was a big undertaking

C: Ya and there was concern and fear in the beginning during the webinars

that residents may not be in that first wave of vaccinations which is very scary. But you know Governor Justice did in fact do that where some states didn’t and there are some residents long-term care that were not in that first wave in other states

H: Right, alright, well

Chris Braley, owner of Braley Care Homes

Thanks for you all are doing there and for stopping by and sharing how things are going now that you all have gotten vaccinated.

C: Thank you for having me!

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

© 2020 Braley Care Homes, Inc.

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What is memory care?

What is Memory Care?

Understanding memory care

Memory care is specialized care for people living with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.  Communities that specialize in memory care typically feature safe and secure environments where staff can closely monitor the health and safety of the residents.

When it becomes difficult to care for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia at home, you may want to consider memory care. Memory care is a form of senior living that provides intensive, specialized care for people with memory issues. 

Communities that specialize in memory care, like Braley Care Homes, typically feature programs, activities and events that are designed to help residents with memory care issues work on their cognitive abilities in an enjoyable way.  

Staff in environments like this are typically specially trained to provide the kind of quality care required by people suffering from Alzheimer’s, dementia, and other forms of memory loss.

What makes memory care different from assisted living?

Memory care is designed to provide a safe, structured environment with set routines to lower stress for people with Alzheimer’s or dementia while protecting and enhancing their cognitive abilities . Employees provide meals and help residents with personal care tasks, just like the staff at an assisted living facility typically would, but they are also specially trained to deal with the unique issues that often arise as a result of dementia or Alzheimer’s. Staff members in specialized memory care facilities check in with residents more frequently and provide extra structure and support to help them navigate their day. 

What should you expect from a memory care community?

If someone you care about or care for is experiencing memory loss, it doesn’t mean that either of you should have to sacrifice your quality of life.  Short term and long term care programs exist to make sure that both you and your loved ones get the support you need.  At Braley Care Homes our residents live in a home-like environment surrounded by people who support them, and encourage them to enjoy life to the fullest.  In a specialized memory care facility, residents are able to experience feelings of belonging and purpose through activities and interaction that preserve their current skill levels and can even help improve memory and functionality.

At Braley Care Homes we have created a warm and welcoming home-like environment for residents, while also protecting their health and security at all times.  Residents feel at home with a balance of community, privacy, and creature comforts that remind them of home.  

Our Home features a secure setting where your loved one will be safe.  Traffic in and out of our facility is monitored and controlled at all times to make sure residents are safe at all times.

We also feature personal and person-centered care programs.  We are all unique, and we believe that providing quality care that caters to each resident is the cornerstone of providing the best care possible.

This includes activities that enrich the lives and well being of all residents. As a resident, your loved one will have a full social calendar that changes regularly. Our residents stay engaged with a gentle daily structure of planned activities to help them maintain their abilities and encourage the use of their current skills. Brain games, dancing, art classes, and music programs are just a few of the ways our residents enjoy their days and protect their cognitive abilities.

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

© 2020 Braley Care Homes, Inc.

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Nursing Homes and Dementia

Nursing Homes and Dementia

Placing a loved one in residential long-term care is somewhat straightforward for a lot of people and seniors as well. There are various forms of senior living and they might seem easy enough to understand on the first impression but choosing when and where to put an elderly loved one is not as easy especially when they have been diagnosed with some form of dementia or memory loss.

Due to the severity of dementia at its later stages, it is almost safe to conclude that if someone has dementia, a nursing home should be considered as a solution at some point. However, it is easy to make the mistake of thinking that efforts in providing long-term care would match up to the demanding needs of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease but that is not often the case. 

 

Below is a comprehensive breakdown of dementia, nursing home care provision, the different types of care homes available, and tips to follow when choosing a special care facility for a loved one.

Understanding Dementia and Nursing Home Care

Before discussing the issue of nursing homes and dementia, it is wise to have a comprehensive understanding of what nursing home care involves as well as dementia. 

Dementia is a complicated condition that alters cognition, behavior, and memory. As a disorder, it is linked with a decline in quality of life. 14% of people aged 70 and higher are reported to have dementia. 

A time may come when a person living with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease will require more care than can be offered at home especially as the condition progresses through to the later stages when care needs become more urgent and intense. 

This makes the need to move into a residential care facility become almost necessary although a lot of people are not comfortable with the idea of sending a loved one to a nursing home. 

Nursing homes provide long-term care on a frequent basis to the aging population and should not be confused with assisted living or assisted living for people suffering from dementia. 

Interestingly enough, nearly 15% of Americans diagnosed with dementia live in nursing homes and over 50% of nursing home residents have some degree of dementia. It is also estimated that about 70% of Americans suffering from dementia will die in a nursing home. 

Assisted living offers less care as compared to a nursing home and has very different protocols to how practitioners go about their work. Skilled nursing is another field that is often directly associated with nursing homes. While nursing homes provide long-term care, skilled nursing is purposed for short-term care or rehabilitation from an injury. 

Available Housing Options for Patients Struggling with Dementia

Every institution involved in providing residential long-term care has its own protocol that outlines how it goes about providing care to elderly people. These protocols vary with the rules and regulations as per state. 

It is therefore important that you understand the general care provision levels for seniors on the chance that you are considering putting a loved one in a nursing home and you want to find one providing the right level of care as per your loved one’s needs. 

Below is a comprehensive breakdown of dementia, nursing home care provision, memory care and the different types of care homes available, and tips to follow when choosing a special care facility for a loved one.

Nursing Homes

Nursing home facilities provide the highest level of long-term care. Staff members working in these facilities provide round-the-clock care and have various levels of training. This means that there is a differentiation in the medical skills and expertise available and the staff can, therefore, provide assistance with administering injections, medications, as well as any other complex medical functions. 

Nursing homes accommodate patients with dementia who are at the later stages of their disease when they are not able to walk, talk, or eat by themselves.

Assisted Living

Assisted living provides residents with hands-on assistance on activities that involve daily living and many of these institutions provide a wide selection of additional care services at an added cost. However, kindly note that skilled nursing care is not offered. 

Dementia patients in the early to intermediate stages usually spend a bit of time in assisted living institutions because they are allowed to be somewhat independent and their health and safety are catered for. The rooms they stay in are private and the staff is not available 24/7 apart from emergency care staff. 

Nursing homes accommodate patients with dementia who are at the later stages of their disease when they are not able to walk, talk, or eat by themselves.

The aim of memory care facilities is to offer long-term residential care curated for people suffering from intermediate to later phases of dementia. A patient diagnosed with dementia may decide to move to a memory care unit depending on the resources available. 

There are facilities dedicate to providing memory care such as care campuses that offer various levels of care in one area, or an assisted living facility in a secure wing. 

Because they are considered ‘special care units’, staff members working in these facilities are well skilled in caring for people with dementia or Alzheimer’s. They are well trained and experienced in communicating with the residents, identifying signs indicating changes in a resident’s psychological behavior, as well as dealing with the difficult behaviors that may come up while administering care and how to deescalate such situations.  

The primary step to choosing the ideal living facility for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia involves doing a needs assessment. Residents in nursing homes in the later phases of dementia are completely functionally dependent, have restricted speech ability speaking no more than 8 words, and are confined to their beds. Offering care to these residents needs skills and knowledge specific to their various medical, physiological, and supportive needs.  

After a needs assessment has been conducted, it is advisable that you conduct a cost assessment so that you can have clear insight as to whether you can afford to pay for the cost of a care home and which care facility is within your budget. Another thing you should look out for is the location of the institution. Is the center close to family or friends and is it easily accessible? 

Another factor that you should consider is the service provided by the facilities as per the needs of your loved one. Are there enough toilets? Are the rooms offered private and how much space do they have? Is the caring staff available 24/7 and how well trained are they? 

These tips should give you thorough insight into whether you should opt for a care facility and which facility you should choose for your loved one.

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Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

© 2020 Braley Care Homes, Inc.

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Nursing Homes with Memory Care Centers

Nursing Homes with Memory Care Centers

Nearly 50% of older adults living in long-term care centers suffer from Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. For the families living with a loved one with dementia, they usually have to choose between a nursing home or memory care. What sets the two apart is that nursing homes are meant for people with just about any medical ailment that makes it difficult to stay at home unattended.

Memory care, on the other hand, is strictly dedicated to taking care of people with dementia. Memory care facilities are structured to serve the needs of residents with dementia and usually work within care units of care centers. Some memory care facilities are highly secure while others are less strict when it comes to access. 

If you have an elderly loved one experiencing difficulties with their memory which are preventing them from performing daily living activities such as bathing, eating, dressing, walking, and self-administering medicine, then you should probably consider transferring them to a memory care unit. Below is important information that could help you make a more informed decision concerning memory care facilities, what services they offer, and how further they differ from nursing homes. 

Below is a comprehensive breakdown of dementia, nursing home care provision, the different types of care homes available, and tips to follow when choosing a special care facility for a loved one.

Understanding Memory Care

At present, a lot of assisted living centers have memory care centers operating within their facilities. However, assisted living and memory care are very different in the services they provide. 

Memory care involves a more comprehensive form of elderly care as it is solely dedicated to people living with dementia, Alzheimer’s, and any other forms of memory impairment. Memory care centers are usually easy to navigate through on the chance that a patient manages to wander off but they also have staff members round the clock to provide supervision on the probability that it actually happens. 

Dementia patients in the early to intermediate stages usually spend a bit of time in assisted living institutions because they are allowed to be somewhat independent and their health and safety are catered for. The rooms they stay in are private and the staff is not available 24/7 apart from emergency care staff. 

Nursing homes accommodate patients with dementia who are at the later stages of their disease when they are not able to walk, talk, or eat by themselves.

Benefits Provided by Memory Care Centers

Of all forms of senior care, memory care has grown increasingly rapid and with good reason too. Memory care services are more specific as compared to assisted living as it is better poised to offer high value to a patient dealing with Alzheimer’s or dementia. Some of these benefits include less violent episodes, increased social interactions, fewer falls or injuries, reduced visits to the emergency room, or decreased need for medications. 

On top of the fact that memory care centers are responsible for keeping seniors safe and promoting their physical and mental conditions, they provide patients with care services that are structured to decrease their loss of memory. These services range from basic treatments to patient-curated services designed by industry professionals who have specialized in managing dementia.

Nursing Homes for People with Dementia

The services offered in a nursing home are not strictly designed for people with dementia as compared to memory care centers. You’ll find that the services offered by nursing homes are structured for the general elderly staying within their residential premises. 

 

For instance, some nursing homes accommodate certain activities that someone with dementia might find frustrating such as cooking or going for walk whereas memory care units might have centers solely dedicated to that purpose. However, there are nursing homes that provide services accommodative of people with moderate dementia.

When You Should Consider Going To A Nursing Home

In certain situations, a nursing home may be the only option especially if a loved one suffers from other serious medical conditions apart from dementia. Different memory centers have different ways in which they work and these protocols vary according to state. 

For example, some states do not permit nursing homes to admit anyone who would pose a challenge to evacuate in case of an emergency. Others do not admit people who require tubes to eat or ventilators to breathe. This makes it difficult for people to admit an aging loved one to a memory care center and opt for a nursing home instead. 

Most people, however, prefer to go with a nursing home that has a memory care center among its amenities. This makes making the transition much easier if there happens to be a need to. 

When You Should Consider Choosing Memory Care

There are certain activities that can reduce the development of dementia and these are services you will not usually find in a nursing home. For example, scientific study has shown that doing an outdoors walk at regular times of the day can help people struggling with dementia apart from the straightforward benefits of exercise. You’ll find that a nursing home might not be so open to that idea. 

Music, which is usually found in all residential living rooms for the elderly, might not be so welcome to people with dementia. Memory care staff will have to approach and speak to a patient gently before requesting to play them any music despite the fact that it has been found to offer therapeutic benefits to people with Alzheimer’s.  

Music, which is usually found in all residential living rooms for the elderly, might not be so welcome to people with dementia. Memory care staff will have to approach and speak to a patient gently before requesting to play them any music despite the fact that it has been found to offer therapeutic benefits to people with Alzheimer’s.  

Perhaps the fact that staff members at a memory care unit are better trained in caring and responding to dementia-related issues such as wandering or hostilities from the patient. The chances you’ll find staff trained specifically to help people with dementia working in a nursing home are not as high as staff members working in a memory care unit. 

Every state has set in place rules stipulating how staff must be trained and experience for a certain amount of time before they are deemed qualified to engage a patient with dementia. Memory care centers give more assurance on this issue as compared to nursing homes because the staffers are better skilled at patience when communicating with patients with dementia or calming them down so they can receive to be administered medicine on the chance that they become aggressive. 

Memory care centers are also designed for people with dementia. Subtle things such as brightly decorated or painted walls or allowance of natural light are therapeutic aspects for people living with dementia. 

Choosing whether to make a memory care facility for an elderly loved one is a tough choice. Make sure that you consider the cost, accreditation of the facility, its location, and the services it offers.

Music, which is usually found in all residential living rooms for the elderly, might not be so welcome to people with dementia. Memory care staff will have to approach and speak to a patient gently before requesting to play them any music despite the fact that it has been found to offer therapeutic benefits to people with Alzheimer’s.  

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Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

© 2020 Braley Care Homes, Inc.