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How to Communicate with a Late-Stage Dementia Patient​

How to Communicate with a Late-Stage Dementia Patient

The later stages of dementia

In the later stages of dementia the person is likely to have more problems with verbal communication.

They may not understand what is being said to them and are less likely to be able to respond verbally as they may have limited or no speech. They may repeat the same phrase or sound, or may only be able to repeat a couple of words. Some people may start talking lots but their words don’t seem to make sense. In this case, try to identify the feelings that the person is trying to get across and respond to these. For example, if the person is smiling and chatting happily, respond to them in the same way.

Although the person may not be able to communicate verbally, they may still be able to show their needs and emotions in other ways. Rather than speaking, they may use behavior, facial expression, gestures, and sounds to try and communicate how they are feeling and what their needs are.

Try to support the person to communicate as much as possible. It can help to observe their body language, behavior, and facial expressions. Knowing the person and how they communicate will help you both to enjoy time together. It’s important to keep communicating with the person and look for opportunities for meaningful engagement. Finding ways to engage the person’s senses can help.

When you’re thinking about how to communicate with the person, bear in mind their needs and background – including their cultural needs. For example, people from some cultural backgrounds may feel uncomfortable or distressed if you’re too close to them when you’re communicating with them.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Communication Tips: Late Stage Dementia

The quality of life for people living with dementia is largely dependent on their connection with others. Maintaining a relationship can be a complex and challenging process, especially when verbal communication is lost. During the late stage of dementia, individuals may lose the capacity for recognizable speech, although words or phrases may occasionally be uttered.

However, even if the person can no longer communicate verbally or recognize you, they likely will still be able to communicate in other ways and feel your affection and reassurance. At this stage, non-verbal communication will become increasingly important. The world is primarily perceived through the senses by people with late-stage dementia. We as caregivers can take advantage of this and use the senses to maintain a connection.

• Touch: Hold the person’s hand. Give a gentle massage to the hands, legs, or feet.

• Smell: The person may enjoy the smell of a favorite perfume, flower, or food, which may bring back happy memories.

• Vision: Videos can be relaxing, especially those with scenes of nature and soft, calming sounds.

• Hearing: Reading to the person can be comforting, even if they may not understand the words. Speak gently and with affection; your tone can help the person feel safe and relaxed. Music is a universal language that promotes well-being for most of us. Sing together or play music, especially the type of music the person has enjoyed throughout their life.

Research suggests that although someone in the late stage of Alzheimer’s has lost the ability to talk and express needs, some of the person’s core sense of self remains intact. By maintaining a meaningful connection using nonverbal communication strategies, we’re able to tap into the person’s remaining faculties and truly improve their quality of life.

Source: tenderrose.com

keep eye contact when communicating

non-verbal communication (such as gestures, facial expression, and body language) can help

smile

use appropriate physical contact (such as holding hands) to let the person know you are there and offer reassurance

don’t rush – allow plenty of time and look for non-verbal clues from the person

even if you don’t think the person can follow what you’re saying, continue talking to them clearly. They may still feel a certain way even if they don’t fully understand what you’re saying

consider responding to them in the way they respond to you (‘mirroring’ them).

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Late Stage Communication

During the late stages of Alzheimer’s disease, problems with speech and understanding language increase considerably. Individuals may repeat questions and words over and over, they may contract several words into one to form nonsense words, and may even produce unintelligible sounds without a beginning or an end. It may be very difficult for a caregiver to know if a person is hungry, needs to use the toilet, or is in pain.

Here is where close observation of body language is important. Any utterance or gesture should be viewed as an attempt to convey meaning, and caregivers need to tune in to what the person is trying to communicate.

Source: ararf.org

Back to basics

How we communicate with a person with advanced dementia can vary, depending on what we know about the individual – particularly things they have enjoyed during their life. It can be influenced by where they are receiving the care (in their own home, care home or hospital) and the relationship they have with the people providing care and support.

It sometimes helps to think about how we communicate with a baby or toddler just starting out on their life. We have to be very careful when making comparisons between older people and children. We do not want to be in the habit of treating adult citizens as if they were children in a way that would feel patronising.

From a conceptual point of view, however, if we see human development as being triggered by the brain maturing through infancy and childhood, what we see happening in dementia can be viewed as a reversal of this process.

There are some striking similarities between what babies and toddlers need from their carers or care workers and what people with advanced or end-stage dementia need from theirs. Most people who have cared for babies or toddlers find some reactions that come quite naturally.

We feel drawn to use touch, to hold, to stroke gently, to achieve eye-contact, to try to make them smile, to soothe them when they cry and to make sure they are comfortable. Over time we get to know the personality of the baby or toddler and what they are trying to communicate.

Communicating with a person with advanced dementia requires us to use these same set of skills. We need to recognise that we are caring for someone who has a long life behind them and many stored memories and experiences. If we can find a bridge into these memories we can find a way to communicate with them and nurture their spirit at this final stage of life.

Source: scie.org.uk

Keep communicating

Communication should be there until the end. Never assume that the person cannot hear or understand you. Try reminiscing about their past, talk to them about things of interest (for example, how the family are and what the grandchildren are doing). Pick up on a hobby or interest they may have had (if they enjoyed horse racing, talk about the races that day, the form of the horses, the odds and the jockeys involved).

Non-verbal communication is vital. Touch can be used to stimulate senses and provide reassurance. Try to achieve eye contact. Be aware of the tone of your voice. Remember that the expression on your face will convey more than the content of your words.

Communicating well with a person in end-stage dementia is not written about extensively. It is something that is best seen first-hand. Some years ago, communication experts Kate Allan and John Killick undertook an in-depth piece of work in Australia called the Good Sunset Project specifically to develop ways of working with people with advanced dementia. They based this on a communication approach developed in coma work and got some very positive results.

Source: scie.org.uk

 

 

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6192 US 60

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The Progression and Stages of Dementia​​

The Progression and Stages of Dementia​​

What to expect as the person’s dementia progresses

Caring for someone with dementia can be a great reward but it can be challenging at times. Prepare yourself by knowing what to expect.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Making medical decisions for people with dementia

With dementia, a person’s body may continue to be physically healthy. However, dementia causes the gradual loss of thinking, remembering, and reasoning abilities, which means that people with dementia at the end of life may no longer be able to make or communicate choices about their health care. If there are no advance care planning documents in place and the family does not know the person’s wishes, caregivers may need to make difficult decisions on behalf of their loved one about care and treatment approaches.

When making health care decisions for someone with dementia, it’s important to consider the person’s quality of life. For example, medications are available that may delay or keep symptoms from getting worse for a limited time. Medications also may help control some behavioral symptoms in people with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. However, some caregivers might not want drugs prescribed for people in the later stages of these diseases if the side effects outweigh the benefits.

It is important to consider the goals of care and weigh the benefits, risks, and side effects of any treatment. You may need to make a treatment decision based on the person’s comfort rather than trying to extend their life or maintain their abilities for longer.

Source: nia.nih.gov

The progression and stages of dementia

Dementia is progressive. This means symptoms may be relatively mild at first but they get worse with time. Dementia affects everyone differently, however it can be helpful to think of dementia progressing in ‘three stages’.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Why is dementia progressive?

Dementia is not a single condition. It is caused by different physical diseases of the brain, for example Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, DLB and FTD.

In the early stage of all types of dementia only a small part of the brain is damaged. In this stage, a person has fewer symptoms as only the abilities that depend on the damaged part of the brain are affected. These early symptoms are usually relatively minor. This is why ‘mild’ dementia is used as an alternative term for the early stage.

Each type of dementia affects a different area of the brain in the early stages. This is why symptoms vary between the different types. For example, memory loss is common in early-stage Alzheimer’s but is very uncommon in early-stage FTD.

As dementia progresses into the middle and later stages, the symptoms of the different dementia types tend to become more similar. This is because more of the brain is affected as dementia progresses.

Over time, the disease causing the dementia spreads to other parts of the brain. This leads to more symptoms because more of the brain is unable to work properly. At the same time, already-damaged areas of the brain become even more affected, causing symptoms the person already has to get worse.

Eventually most parts of the brain are badly damaged by the disease. This causes major changes in all aspects of memory, thinking, language, emotions and behaviour, as well as physical problems.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

What are Specific Care Needs at Each Stage?

An individual may not require care assistance after the initial diagnosis of dementia, but that will change as the disease progresses and symptoms become worse. There are about 16 million unpaid caregivers of people with dementia in the United States. While many caregivers are providing daily help for family members, they also hire someone to help. There are many options of care assistance, such as in-home care adult day care nursing home care . There is also financial assistance Early Stage Dementia As mentioned above, in the early stage of dementia a person can function rather independently and requires little care assistance. Simple reminders of appointments and names of people may be needed. Caregivers can also assist with coping strategies to help loved ones remain as independent as possible, such as writing out a daily to-do list and a schedule for taking medications. Safety should always be considered, and if any tasks cannot be performed safely alone, supervision and assistance should be provided. During this period of dementia, it’s a good idea for caregivers and loved ones to discuss the future. For example, a long-term care plan should be made and financial and legal matters put in place.

Middle Stage Dementia In the middle stage of dementia, an individual loses some independence. Assistance with activities of daily living, such as bathing grooming, and dressing is often required. Initially, an individual may only need prompts or cues to perform these tasks, such as reminders to shower or having clothes laid out on the bed. However, at some point more hands-on assistance will be required. Establishing a routine becomes important, and caregivers need to exercise patience. Since individuals in this stage of dementia have greater difficulty communicating , caregivers need to talk slowly, clearly, and use non-verbal communication. Individuals will no longer be able to drive, so transportation will be required. It is also in this stage of dementia when it becomes unsafe to leave the individual alone, which means supervision is necessary.

Late Stage Dementia A person in this last stage of dementia requires a significant amount of care. Assistance and supervision is required 24 hours per day. Dementia patients may require assistance getting in and out of bed, moving from the bed to a chair, or may be bedridden and require help changing positions to avoid bedsores. Swallowing becomes an issue in late-stage dementia, and caregivers have to make sure food is cut into small pieces, is soft (like yogurt and applesauce), or is pureed. At some point, the individual will be 100% dependent on their caregiver and will no longer be able to complete any daily living activities alone. Not all families are equipped to offer this level of care. As mentioned previously, there are other options for care , such as hiring a part time caregiver or moving your loved one to a nursing home.

For more information on caring for individuals with dementia, click here . It’s important to remember, providing care for a loved one can be stressful, and self-care is a must.

Source: dementiacarecentral.com

Taking care of yourself

Despite your best efforts, caring for someone with dementia becomes harder as the disease moves on, and the person you are caring for becomes more dependent on you. This is a time when many family members need more support for themselves. The following tips are to help family members take care of themselves and plan for the future.

Avoid isolation and loneliness by keeping up with social activities and contact with others as much as possible.

Take care of your own health.

Join a caregiver support groupto connect with others living with the day-to-day issues of Alzheimer’s disease and facing practical challenges, grief and loss.

Watch for signs of stress and how it can affect your health and ability to provide care.

Be aware that you may already be grieving the gradual losses caused by the disease.

Seek professional help if feelings of depression or anxiety are overwhelming.

Be flexible about routines and expectations.

Try to be positive and use humour as a part of care strategies.

Make time for yourself by using respite care options, including adult day programs, professional homecare services, other family members or friends, volunteer caregivers and friendly visiting programs.

Source: alzheimer.ca

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6192 US 60

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Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Dementia and Family Dynamics

Dementia and Family Dynamics

Dementia and Family Dynamics

It may be hard to imagine, but for some families, dementia has a silver lining. The diagnosis may bring families closer as members work together to solve a common challenge. It forces intimacy when bodily functions become less personal. And it can cause relatives to depend on each other for emotional support.

More often, though, dementia sparks conflict, guilt, grief, sacrifice, uncertainty negative emotions that can affect the quality of life for the person with dementia and their loved ones. Studies show that more than most other diseases, dementia increases stress and decreases mental health and well-being in caregivers for a variety of reasons:

• Caring for someone with dementia is difficult, time-consuming, and may necessitate the caregiver leaving their job and abandoning hobbies and relationships.

• Dementia can be isolating because it’s so individual.

• The progressive and unpredictable nature of dementia makes planning difficult, increasing uncertainty and anxiety.

• Many family members experience guilt when caring for someone with dementia, wondering if they’re doing enough for their loved one.

• Adult children of people with dementia may find themselves bathing, dressing, and feeding their parents. The resulting sense of loss can cut both ways: Adult children grieve the parent they knew, and the person with dementia depending on how lucid they are may grieve the effect their diagnosis has on their children.

• Frustration can arise when the care recipient is unable to express gratitude.

You may be dealing with these stressors and/or others, making your experience with dementia far from any silver lining. If that’s the case, here are some ideas to help maintain your well-being and navigate the land mines of family dynamics and dementia.

Remember that what you’re experiencing is normal. All your emotions are shared by millions of loved ones around the world. You may feel alone you’re not.

Stay flexible. Dementia is not fixed. The disease evolves and changes so what you’re handling right now may change next week. Try not to fixate on one way of doing things.

Be patient. This is easier said than done. But try to keep in mind that your loved one isn’t intentionally being difficult. The best care you can provide is a healthy dose of patience.

Ask for and offer help. If you’re in over your head, ask your family for support. Try to make your requests specific versus open-ended: “I need someone to do the grocery shopping. I need you to take mom to the doctor on Tuesday. I need coverage on Wednesday so I can take a day off.” Remember that if you need help, other family caregivers may need support as well. Check in and see how everyone is doing and what might make it easier for everyone.

Communicate. Consider weekly family meetings to discuss the latest developments and who’s handling what.

Consider an intermediary. When tensions run high in already fraught situations, the results can be explosive. Try to diffuse the situation before it gets to that point by using an intermediary to negotiate with difficult family members if disagreements about care seem insurmountable.

Hire support if necessary. Bring in professionals if you need to. Professional caregivers, housekeepers, personal assistants, and others can relieve you of the burden of care when it gets too heavy.

Take care of yourself. Studies show that caregivers who adapt to stress share two qualities: optimism and resilience. Resilience is the ability to cope effectively and adapt. Optimism is the expectation of a positive outcome in the face of adversity. Ask yourself what you can do to increase these qualities in yourself. Regular exercise? Time away? Professional support? Banish the misconception that self-care is selfish: you simply can’t take care of your loved one unless you first take care of yourself.

Caring for someone with dementia is especially hard when family dynamics are unhealthy. The most important thing you can do for your family, yourself, and your loved one is to work together and support each other. Quality of life is possible if you know how to create it.

Source: tenderrose.com

A guideline for navigating changes in Family Dynamics

In order to cope with the change in dynamics, it’s important to face everything as a family with open communication, understanding and compassion. This battle is different for everyone, so it’s important to do what you can to help one another. To help you navigate the changes, keep some of the following points in mind.

Adjusting will not happen overnight.Just because you now know about the disease and have a plan in place doesn’t mean you know everything there is to know. Alzheimer’s disease affects families and their loved ones differently, so your “normal” may change multiple times through the course of the disease. Take time to adjust and give yourself – and other family members – some grace.

People generally work better in numbers.If you or another family member need help with caregiving tasks, ask for help or step in to help. Is a family member having an emotionally hard time dealing with the diagnosis? Reach out and help them. Are household tasks getting put on the backburner? Take some time to help them clean.

Make sure everyone is on the same page.Again, communication is key. If your loved one is getting worse, tell your family. If there is something they need to step up and do, ask your family to help with it. If you learn something that makes your loved one with Alzheimer’s feel better, share that with other family members. Be a team and communicate to be better caregivers.

“If you and your family are having trouble coping with your loved one’s diagnosis, reach out for help and support,” says Peggy. “Joining support groups, talking to a counselor or pastor, or seeking out options for care can help to make your journey through Alzheimer’s disease easier.”

Source: lionsgateccrc.org

Siblings disagree about how much care is needed

Adult siblings don’t always see caregiving needs the same way. One child may have the impression that a parent is doing fine at home, while another feels that the parent needs extra help. This is especially common if family members are spread out geographically or spend different amounts of time with the aging loved one.

Source: aplaceformom.com

How relationships change

Alzheimer’s disease does not change a person’s need for love and affection, but it changes many aspects of a relationship. You may lose the companionship of someone who has been close and important to you. You’ll need to find different ways to express your feelings.

Alzheimer’s disease can also affect the sexual relationship of partners. It can change a person’s interest in sex, either increasing or decreasing it. This may create a problem. For example, the person may put demands on you for more sex than is wanted.

A person with dementia may be overly affectionate at the wrong time or place. If this happens, explain the disease and its effects to the people involved to help them understand.

You may also find your role in your relationship has changed. Perhaps the person always looked after the family’s finances and this task has now fallen to you. Making decisions about financial and legal matters may be overwhelming. You may need to ask family members, friends or professionals to help you.

You may also find that your relationships with friends and family have changed. Perhaps they hesitate to spend time with you because they’re not sure what to say or may worry about the person’s behaviour. You may need to be the one to contact friends and family members. Suggest the best way to communicate with your family member with dementia, such as what to expect or activities they may still enjoy together. This may help you keep these sources of support close to you and the person you care for, at a time when you most need them.

Providing care for someone close to you can create new sources of stress in the rest of the family. Other family members may not be able to accept the person’s illness; you may resent the lack of help from other family members who don’t feel able, for whatever reason, to help out. You may also disagree on decisions about finances and care. It’s most helpful if these concerns can be acknowledged and addressed. You can do this through holding a family meeting, accepting that you will not all agree, sharing responsibility for care (even if it’s not an equal share), and continuing to communicate so that family members don’t feel left out.

The Alzheimer Society can help; don’t try to do this alone!

Source: alzheimer.ca

The Help You Need in a Memory Care Facility

As with all Stonegate Senior Living-supported properties, the staff at Pathways Memory Care know how to help families navigate the troubled waters to find the support they need. They understand that dealing with the progressive disease can become overwhelming.

Take, for example, Dawn Revere, who gave up her job to look after her husband, who contracted early-onset Alzheimer’s, at age 50, and finally succumbed four years later. “This experience caused me to be an emotional wreck, but I knew I couldn’t fall apart,” Dawn says in her testimony on the Alzheimer’s Prevention Registry. “I was his rock. I did everything I could to protect him and give him the best care possible.”

Providing care to a loved one with dementia can become too much for many people. Statistics show that seniors with dementia are three times more likely to be hospitalized or go to a specialized senior care facility than those without. They wind up requiring the kinds of professional long- term support and services just not possible for most untrained family members to provide.

At Pathways Memory Care, they rely on Warchol Best-Abilities Care Model to ensure a “loved one is able to live to his or her emotional, spiritual, and functional potential at every stage of dementia.” As with all Stonegate memory care facilities, it provides special programs to slow down memory loss and enhance quality of life for every stage of the resident’s experience of Alzheimer’s or dementia.

Source: accelcrystalpark.com

Tips for families

Listen to each family member with respect. Coping with a progressive illness, such as Dementia or Alzheimer’s, can be stressful — and not everyone reacts in the same way. Family members may have different opinions. Some relatives may deny what is happening; a long-distance relative may be resented for living far away; or there may be disagreement about financial and care decisions, especially at the end-of-life. These issues are complex and require ongoing discussions. Give everyone an opportunity to share their opinion and avoid blaming or attacking each other, as this will only cause more hurt.

Discuss caregiving responsibilities. Talk through caregiving roles and responsibilities. Make a list of tasks and include how much time, money and effort may be involved to complete them. Divide tasks according to the family member’s preferences and abilities. Some family members may be hands-on caregivers, responding immediately to issues and organizing resources. Others may be more comfortable with being told to complete specific tasks. Consider setting up an online care calendar to coordinate helpers.

Continue to talk. Keep the lines of communication open. Schedule regular meetings or conference calls to keep everyone involved up-to-date. Discuss how things are working, reassess the needs of the person with Alzheimer’s, and decide if any changes in responsibilities are needed. Plan for anticipated changes as the disease progresses.

Cope with changes and loss together. As Alzheimer’s progresses and cognitive abilities change, it is normal to experience feelings of loss. Caregivers and family members may want to seek support from others who are dealing with similar situations. Attend a support group in your area or join our ALZConnected online community.

Seek outside help. If tensions and disagreements are ongoing, you may want to seek help from a trusted third party, such as a spiritual leader, mediator or counselor. Sometimes, an outside perspective can help everyone take a step back and work through the difficult issues.

Source: alz.org





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Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Common Misconceptions about Dementia – Duplicate – [#1457]

Normal Aging vs Early Signs of Dementia

The Truth About Aging and Dementia

As we age, our brains change, but Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias are not an inevitable part of aging. In fact, up to 40% of dementia cases may be prevented or delayed. It helps to understand what’s normal and what’s not when it comes to brain health.

Normal brain aging may mean slower processing speeds and more trouble multitasking, but routine memory, skills, and knowledge are stable and may even improve with age. It’s normal to occasionally forget recent events such as where you put your keys or the name of the person you just met.

In the United States, 6.2 million people age 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease, the most common type of dementia. People with dementia have symptoms of cognitive decline that interfere with daily life—including disruptions in language, memory, attention, recognition, problem solving, and decision-making.
Source: cdc.gov

The differences between normal aging and dementia

If you are experiencing difficulties with memory, know that they may not be signs of dementia. It could be memory loss as a part of normal aging.

If you are concerned that you or someone you know has dementia, please talk to your doctor.

Source: alzheimer.ca

What is aging?

Aging is a natural process of our lives. As we age, we experience gradual changes to our brains and bodies. Some of these changes affect our physical and mental abilities, and may increase our risk of disease.

Each one of us experiences aging differently. The extent of how we experience changes due to aging, and the point in our lives when they start becoming more noticeable, varies from person to person.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), each person should have the ability to live a long and healthy life. This is considered healthy aging.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Memory, Forgetfulness, and Aging: What’s Normal and What’s Not?

Many older adults worry about their memory and other thinking abilities. For example, they might be concerned about taking longer than before to learn new things, or they may sometimes forget to pay a bill. These changes are usually signs of mild forgetfulness — often a normal part of aging — not serious memory problems.

Source: nia.nih.gov

What’s normal forgetfulness and what’s not?

What’s the difference between normal, age-related forgetfulness and a serious memory problem? It’s normal to forget things once in a while as we age, but serious memory problems make it hard to do everyday things like driving, using the phone, and finding your way home.

Talk with your doctor to determine whether memory and other cognitive problems, such as the ability to clearly think and learn, are normal and what may be causing them.

Signs that it might be time to talk to a doctor include:

Asking the same questions over and over again

Getting lost in places a person knows well

Having trouble following recipes or directions

Becoming more confused about time, people, and places

Not taking care of oneself —eating poorly, not bathing, or behaving unsafely

 

Source: nia.nih.gov

 

Normal Aging vs. Dementia

While some mild changes in cognition are considered a normal part of the aging process, . Normal age-related declines are subtle and mostly affect the speed of thinking and attentional control. In abnormal aging, declines in cognition are more severe and may include other thinking abilities, such as rapid forgetting or difficulties navigating, solving common problems, expressing oneself in conversation or behaving outside of social rules. Abnormal aging can also include the motor system resulting in excessive tripping, falls or tremor. Often it is difficult to determine exactly when a person should be concerned with cognitive changes they may be experiencing. Symptoms vary from person to person – what is normal for one person may not be normal for another. This contributes to the challenges clinicians face when determining whether what someone is experiencing is a significant dementia or not.

Source: memory.ucsf.edu

When Forgetfulness Is a Problem

If memory loss makes it hard for you to handle your daily tasks, that’s a sign you shouldn’t ignore. Are you forgetting things you only just heard? Asking the same question over and over again? Relying on lots of paper or electronic reminders just to get through the day? Talk to your doctor if you or your family notices that happening to you.

 

Source: webmd.com

Signs of Dementia

Sometimes, there does come a point at which forgetfulness becomes more prominent and affects daily life. These symptoms can point to dementia. Some signs of a more serious problem, such as dementia, include:

Not being able to remember a recent conversation or event, or forgetting what’s happening while it’s happening

Being unable to learn or remember new information

Having significant language issues, such as struggling to have a conversation because of word-finding problems

Experiencing significant mood or personality changes such as depression, anxiety, or intense irritability

Appearing apathetic or withdrawn

Frequently pausing when talking

Forgetting family members’ names

Often getting lost and needing help finding one’s way

Experiencing significant declines in reaction time, which may affect driving, cooking, or the ability to recover from tripping and falling

The key to understanding what is normal aging and what could be dementia is evaluating how it affects daily life. For example, if your loved one is anxious because they can no longer manage their checkbook or monthly bills, you should speak with a physician.

Are you caring for someone with dementia? The Caregiver’s Complete Guide to Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care includes tips to help you accommodate your loved one’s changing needs.

Source: arborcompany.com

The different levels of memory loss

Age-associated memory impairment

If you are experiencing difficulties with memory, but:

They are not noticeably disrupting your daily life,

They are not affecting your ability to complete tasks as you usually would,

You have no difficulty learning and remembering new things and

There’s no underlying medical condition that is causing your memory problems,

Then you have what’s known as age-associated memory impairment.

Age-associated memory impairment is considered to be a normal part of aging. It doesn’t mean you have dementia.

Though you may have difficulties remembering things on occasion, like where you left your keys, a password for a website or the name of a former classmate, these are not signs you have dementia. You may not remember things as quickly as you used to, but most of the time there is no cause for concern.

Source: alzheimer.ca

When to visit the doctor for memory loss

If you, a family member, or friend has problems remembering recent events or thinking clearly, talk with a doctor. He or she may suggest a thorough checkup to see what might be causing the symptoms. You may also wish to talk with your doctor about opportunities to participate in research on cognitive health and aging.

At your doctor visit, he or she can perform tests and assessments, which may include a brain scan, to help determine the source of memory problems. Your doctor may also recommend you see a neurologist, a doctor who specializes in treating diseases of the brain and nervous system.

Memory and other thinking problems have many possible causes, including depression, an infection, or medication side effects. Sometimes, the problem can be treated, and cognition improves. Other times, the problem is a brain disorder, such as Alzheimer’s disease, which cannot be reversed.

Finding the cause of the problems is important for determining the best course of action. Once you know the cause, you can make the right treatment plan. People with memory problems should make a follow-up appointment to check their memory every six to 12 months. They can ask a family member, friend, or the doctor’s office to remind them if they’re worried they’ll forget.

Learn more about cognitive health and Alzheimer’s and related dementias.

 

Source: nia.nih.gov

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Common Misconceptions about Dementia

Common Misconceptions about Dementia

Common Misconceptions About Dementia

The World Health Organization estimates that more than 50 million people across the globe have dementia. Furthermore, at least 10 million new cases arise annually. Unfortunately, these statistics mean that most people know at least one person who has lived with or currently lives with dementia.

If you or a loved one has dementia, knowledge is power. Not only does correct information allow you to better advocate for your loved one and plan for the future, but it can also allow you the comfort of knowing more about what to expect from the disease. However, there are quite a few common misconceptions about dementia out there. Here are some of them so that you can learn the truths that will help you continue to know more about this disease.

Source: arborcompany.com

Below are the common misconceptions about dementia:

Dementia is inevitable with age

This statement is not true. Dementia is not a normal part of aging.

According to a report that the Alzheimer’s Association published, Alzheimer’s disease, which is the most common form of dementia, affects 3% of people aged 65–74 years in the U.S.

As a result of the risk increasing as we age, 17% of people aged 75–84 years and 32% of people aged 85 years and older have a dementia diagnosis.

Source: medicalnewstoday.com

All types of memory loss are a sign of dementia

“One of the biggest misconceptions about dementia is that every kind of memory loss someone might experience is Alzheimer’s disease and that’s not true,” Dr. Sicotte says.

Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, there are many other types.

Dr. Sicotte says that a combination of underlying changes in the brain can cause memory loss, but memory loss is only one component of diagnosing dementia.

Faces of Cedars-Sinai: Neurologist Nancy Sicotte

Source: cedars-sinai.org

 

Dementia only affects older people.

Reality: Dementia can affect people from their 30s onwards.

Dementia is a progressive, degenerative disease of the brain. People over 65 are most likely to get it, but dementia can appear in people under retirement age. When this happens, it’s known as young onset dementia.

Learn more about young onset dementia.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Drinking out of aluminum cans or cooking in aluminum pots and pans can lead to Alzheimer’s disease.

Reality: During the 1960s and 1970s, aluminum emerged as a possible suspect in Alzheimer’s. This suspicion led to concern about exposure to aluminum through everyday sources such as pots and pans, beverage cans, antacids and antiperspirants. Since then, studies have failed to confirm any role for aluminum in causing Alzheimer’s. Experts today focus on other areas of research, and few believe that everyday sources of aluminum pose any threat.

Source: alz.org

Flu shots increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Reality: A theory linking flu shots to a greatly increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease has been proposed by a U.S. doctor whose license was suspended by the South Carolina Board of Medical Examiners. Several mainstream studies link flu shots and other vaccinations to a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease and overall better health.

Source: alz.org

If someone in your family has dementia, that means you will get it as well.

Fact: Some forms of dementia have a genetic component, but there is not a strong genetic link in most cases.

While dementia is genetic and inherited in some cases, not all cases of dementia are hereditary. If a family member has dementia, it may indicate a higher risk of developing dementia, but this is not a guarantee. Some forms of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease, are more prone to being passed on through families. Other forms of dementia, such as those caused by brain injuries or Lyme disease, are less likely to impact multiple family members.

Source: therecoveryvillage.com

Dementia is untreatable and cannot be slowed down

There is no cure for dementia, but early symptoms can be managed through a combination of medication and lifestyle changes.

Early diagnosis is important for successful treatment and extended quality of life.

You can also support risk reduction strategies. Just as you would with heart disease and stroke, you can advise your patients to make life changes that reduce the likelihood they will develop dementia – the earlier, the better.

Source: dementia.org.au

People living with dementia don’t understand what’s happening around them

This is another frequent myth related to dementia. Many people believe that because those living with dementia struggle to communicate effectively, it means that they are not aware of what is happening around them. However, the part of the brain which deals with communication is separate to the area which deals with awareness. This means that, sadly, most do have thoughts to communicate although they struggle to relay these.

Source: barchester.com

People with Alzheimer’s have no hope.

Learning how to live with the disease is key to continuing a meaningful life. Early diagnosis and medications can help. Additionally, caregivers and the person with Alzheimer’s should both seek out support groups and learn to revise life goals and how to offer and/or accept help. In loving environments, people with the disease can participate and enjoy life many years after diagnosis.

Source: keckmedicine.org

Conclusion

While there is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s or dementia, it’s important to recognize the signs and talk to your doctor about the risk factors.

Source: cedars-sinai.org

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Things You Need To Know About Assisted Living For Parents

Things You Need To Know About Assisted Living For Parents

Introduction

Are you worried about your aging parent? Perhaps your loved one fell at home a few months ago, or perhaps you have noticed that they are not taking their medication as prescribed. These are common concerns that can keep you up at night as you struggle to find the right way to keep your loved one healthy and happy.

However, it can be difficult to start the process of searching for assistance. The senior care industry is large, and anyone can feel lost or overwhelmed in the fray. Fortunately, we have compiled everything you need to know about a common and very helpful senior living level of care that could benefit your aging loved one: assisted living.

Source: arborcompany.com

What is assisted living?

Assisted living provides long-term housing and care for seniors. Assisted living residents are generally active, but may need support with activities of daily living (ADLs) , such as bathing, dressing, and using the toilet. Seniors in assisted living can expect personalized care, nutritious meals, a wide range of social activities to cater to a variety of interests, and a sense of community in a safe, residential setting.

Source: aplaceformom.com

What are the benefits of assisted living?

While each community is different, assisted living offers services and amenities to focus on important aspects of senior wellness, including physical health, intellectual stimulation, and social connection. These three foundational pillars help slow cognitive decline and keep seniors healthier and happier longer.

Source: aplaceformom.com

Include Your Loved Ones in the Process

Just because you think your parents need help with medication management, transportation, and meals doesn’t mean they’ll feel the same way about their own needs for care. Your mom might be in denial about how much assistance with day-to-day activities she really needs, or your dad might be resistant to making the move to an assisted living facility.

That’s why it’s critical to include both your loved one and the rest of the family in the process of developing the plan. Actively listen to their concerns. Be responsive to their questions. This will show them that you hear their concerns and want their input on making the decision. The more inclusive you can be, the less likely you will later face roadblocks.

 

Source: arborsassistedliving.com

What Services are Offered at The Nursing Home?

You need to be looking for nursing homes that can provide the services and options you need, and one that can do it with excellence because your family deserves it. If a nursing home facility doesn’t offer a reliable skilled nursing service for its seniors, then that is a red flag. Trusting the life of a loved one in another’s hands is not an easy decision and should be weighed carefully.

Source: stonebridgeseniorliving.com

Introduce the Amenities and Features

When talking to your parents, you should focus on the amenities and features offered in these assisted living communities. For example, did you know that the residents of these communities participate in daily physical activities to improve their health and mobility? Also, experienced chefs prepare delicious and nutritious meals for people in assisted living communities every day. This means that your loved ones will be able to get all the vitamins, minerals, and nutrients they need to live a healthy life. Also, specific food allergies will be taken into consideration to avoid illnesses and other health problems.

Source: terrabellaseniorliving.com

Understand how assisted living can help

Big changes can result in significant stress, especially when the person experiencing the change is elderly. When considering a new home for your parents, review the steps outlined in these articles:

Evaluate your loved one’s needs.

Start with an assessment of their activities of daily living, or ADLs. Can they bathe, dress, and move about easily? How much help do they already require?

Read up on what assisted living offers.

The phrase “assisted living” encompasses far more than people realize, but it’s not the same as nursing homes or memory care two different community types with more daily involvement and specialized care than what’s usually offered in assisted living.

Assisted living communities have evolved with the times. Many are rich with current amenities and activities while maintaining a level of care that allows your loved one to stay safe and healthy.

Talk to a Senior Living Advisor.

Source: aplaceformom.com

Do a background check

For assisted living facilities are on the National Center for Assisted Living’s website. The list also contains contact information for each state’s regulators, who can guide you on how to find information about a facility. Your state’s regulations

If your state requires a license for an assisted living facility, make sure it has one. Ask to review the most recent licensing report.

Licensing agencies may have online facility-complaint databases.

Make sure you clearly understand the terms, and if you have questions, get them answered before you sign. 

• How much are entrance fees and monthly rent, and is a security deposit required?

• What level of personal and health care services are provided?

• What privileges do residents have? For example, are they permitted to bring personal furniture?

• What are the transfer and discharge policies? What specific reasons would lead to a resident being asked to move out, and how much notice would be given?

• Is a resident’s space held if he or she has to be hospitalized?

• Does the contract put any limitations on your right to bring legal action for injury, negligence or other causes? Consumer Reports cautions that many residences include arbitration clauses, which require disputes to be settled outside the legal system via a third party.

Source: aarp.org

How to Make the Transition to Assisted Living

Once you choose a community, your parent/s will be assessed by a staff member. This assessment is to ensure the community knows the medical history and needs of your loved one and that everyone is on the same page regarding expectations and costs. During your assessment time, the nursing staff will work with you to get medications and medical records transferred over to the community so there is no gap in care during the move.

After the assessment, you will be assigned a move-in date. The time before the move is bound to be stressful as you and your loved one work to pack up items to move, to donate, and to sell. Use this time to remind yourself and your loved one about the positive aspects of the new assisted living community. This is also a great time to schedule another meal at the community so that your loved one can meet a few new friends.

Finally, during move-in day, expect a hustle and bustle of activity. You and your parent/s will have assistance with moving in furniture and boxes, and staff will pop in to introduce themselves. No doubt you will also meet a few curious neighbors who pass by to welcome your loved one to their new home. Be sure to pick up the latest community newsletter and activity calendar so you can choose a few interesting events for your loved one to attend in the first week at their new home.

Sooner than you think, your loved one will feel at home in their new assisted living apartment. You will love hearing about delicious meals, new friends, and fun events. Most importantly, you will love knowing that your loved one is safe, healthy, and well-cared-for in their new assisted living home.

 

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Dealing with Dementia

Introduction

Caring for a loved one with dementia poses many challenges for families and caregivers. People with dementia from conditions such as Alzheimer’s and related diseases have a progressive biological brain disorder that makes it more and more difficult for them to remember things, think clearly, communicate with others, and take care of themselves. In addition, dementia can cause mood swings and even change a person’s personality and behavior. This fact sheet provides some practical strategies for dealing with the troubling behavior problems and communication difficulties often encountered when caring for a person with dementia.

Dementia behavior: Confusion

Memory loss and confusion become more common as dementia progresses.

Memory loss can lead to confusion and confusion often manifests as a senior asking the same questions over and over, not recognizing formerly familiar people or places, or becoming disoriented. Caregivers who spend many hours with their loved one may hear phrases and answer questions on repeat: “I want to go home!” “This isn’t my house.” “When are we leaving?” “Why are we here?”

Source: aplaceformom.com

Common causes of confusion

Like many dementia behaviors, confusion can have a number of triggers or root causes. Factors that may contribute to disorientation include the following:

Sundown syndrome or delirium. Up to two-thirds of dementia patients experience sundown syndrome, an evening behavioral shift characterized by increased memory loss, agitation, confusion, and anger. “It may not exactly happen at sundown, but there’s always this hour the witching hour where suddenly the same person may completely change,” Hashmi says.

An unexpected change. Did your senior loved one just move to a new place? Did their routine change?

Paranoia and hallucinations. Dementia leads to complex changes in the brain, which can result in delusion. Seniors may see things that aren’t really there, develop false beliefs, or become suspicious of caregivers and loved ones.

Source: aplaceformom.com

Common changes in behaviour

In the middle to later stages of most types of dementia, a person may start to behave differently. This can be distressing for both the person with dementia and those who care for them.

Some common changes in behaviour include:

repeating the same question or activity over and over again

night-time waking and sleep disturbance

following a partner or spouse around everywhere

loss of self-confidence, which may show as apathy or disinterest in their usual activities

If you’re caring for someone who’s showing these behaviours, it’s important to try to understand why they’re behaving like this, which is not always easy.

You may find it reassuring to remember that these behaviours may be how someone is communicating their feelings. It may help to look at different ways of communicating with someone with dementia Sometimes these behaviours are not a dementia symptom. They can be a result of frustration with not being understood or with their environment, which they no longer find familiar but confusing.

Source: nhs.uk

Coping with dementia

As dementia progresses, each person will find their own way of coping with, and reacting and adapting to, the changes it brings. Developing these coping strategies can be a gradual and subconscious process.

The practical impact of dementia The psychological and emotional impact of dementia

You are here: Coping with dementia Carers: looking after yourself when supporting someone with dementia Understanding and supporting a person with dementia – useful organisations

Coping strategies may include:

practical strategies – eg setting up reminders or prompts, preparing advance decisions or a Lasting Power of Attorney for the future

social strategies – eg relying on family help, seeking spiritual support, joining new activity groups

emotional strategies – eg using humour, focusing on short-term pleasure or living for the moment, focusing on positive aspects

health improvement strategies – eg exercising more, adopting a healthier diet, cutting down on alcohol or smoking.

If a carer understands the person’s coping strategies, they will be able to support them better.

Source: alzheimers.org.uk

Handling Troubling Behavior

Some of the greatest challenges of caring for a loved one with dementia are the personality and behavior changes that often occur. You can best meet these challenges by using creativity, flexibility, patience, and compassion. It also helps to not take things personally and maintain your sense of humor.

To start, consider these ground rules:

We cannot change the person. The person you are caring for has a brain disorder that shapes who he has become. When you try to control or change his behavior, you’ll most likely be unsuccessful or be met with resistance. It’s important to:

Try to accommodate the behavior, not control the behavior. For example, if the person insists on sleeping on the floor, place a mattress on the floor to make him more comfortable.

Remember that we can change our behavior or the physical environment. Changing our own behavior will often result in a change in our loved one’s behavior.

Check with the doctor first. Behavioral problems may have an underlying medical reason: perhaps the person is in pain or experiencing an adverse side effect from medications. In some cases, like incontinence or hallucinations, there may be some medication or treatment that can assist in managing the problem.

Behavior has a purpose. People with dementia typically cannot tell us what they want or need. They might do something, like take all the clothes out of the closet on a daily basis, and we wonder why. It is very likely that the person is fulfilling a need to be busy and productive. Always consider what need the person might be trying to meet with their behavior and, when possible, try to accommodate them.

Behavior is triggered. It is important to understand that all behavior is triggered it occurs for a reason. It might be something a person did or said that triggered a behavior, or it could be a change in the physical environment. The root to changing behavior is disrupting the patterns that we create. Try a different approach, or try a different consequence.

What works today, may not tomorrow. The multiple factors that influence troubling behaviors, and the natural progression of the disease process, mean that solutions that are effective today may need to be modified tomorrow or may no longer work at all. The key to managing difficult behaviors is being creative and flexible in your strategies to address a given issue.

Get support from others. You are not alone there are many others caring for someone with dementia. Locate your nearest Area Agency on Aging, the local chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, to find support groups, organizations, and services that can help you. Expect that, like the loved one you are caring for, you will have good days and bad days. Develop strategies for coping with the bad days.

The following is an overview of the most common dementia-associated behaviors, with suggestions that may be useful in handling them. You’ll find additional resources listed at the end of this fact sheet.

Source: caregiver.org

If you’re looking after someone with dementia

Your needs as a carer are as important as the person you’re caring for.

To help care for yourself:

Try to make some time for yourself, but if it’s difficult to leave the person alone, ask if someone can be with them for a while, such as a friend, relative, or someone from a support group

Source: nhs.uk

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Tips and Guide: Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s

Tips and Guide: Caring for someone with Alzheimer's

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care: Help for Family Caregivers

Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia? This guide will help you cope with the challenges at each stage, find the support you need, and reap the rewards of caregiving.

Source: helpguide.org

Make a plan

As Alzheimer’s progresses, you may need more caregiving help, so it’s good to start out thinking long term. You can’t anticipate every situation, but being forward-thinking now will help you respond more quickly and effectively in an emergency.

It’s also key to spread caregiving tasks around your team from the get-go. You can’t do it all.

Build your team. Beyond medical professionals, reach out to friends, family and community resources to form a larger network of caregiving helpmates.

Determine tasks. Ask team members what they’re willing to do to contribute to your loved one’s care. Is someone available to travel to medical appointments? Prepare meals a few times a week? Even if team members live far away , they can handle jobs like ordering prescriptions or paying bills. Encourage them to stay connected to your loved one; dementia can be extremely isolating.

Listen to your loved one. To the extent possible, the person you’re caring for should always participate in discussions about needs and plans. Consider the recipient of your care the most important member of your caregiving team.

Source: aarp.org

Bathing

For many people with Alzheimer’s disease, bathing is a frightening and confusing experience. Elders may think they have showered recently, but in reality their last shower was days or even weeks ago. They can become confused by the process or become afraid of the water and the possibility of falling. Sensitivity to these issues and planning ahead can help make bath time easier on both of you.

Make sure you have all bath products, towels and assistive devices you need set up before bringing your loved one into the bathroom. Draw the bath ahead of time.

Be sensitive to the temperature of the water and the air. Warm up the room beforehand if necessary, and keep extra towels and a robe nearby. Test the water temperature before beginning the bath or shower.

Minimize safety risks by using a hand-held showerhead, a shower bench, grab bars, and nonskid bath mats. Never leave the person alone in the bathtub or shower.

If they need help bathing, move slowly and tell the person what you are going to do step by step. Allow him or her to assist in the process as much as possible.

Bathing may not be necessary every day. A sponge bath can be effective between full showers or baths.

Bathing Tips and Techniques for Dementia Caregivers

Dressing

Getting dressed may not seem very complicated, but Alzheimer’s patients and caregivers face some unique hurdles with this task. Both physical and cognitive decline affect an elder’s ability to recognize when it is time to change soiled clothes, choose appropriate items to wear, and take off/put on clothing and footwear. Minimizing these challenges can make a significant difference in a loved one’s sense of control and independence.

Always set aside extra time before outings and appointments so they can dress themselves as much as they are able without added pressure or having to rush.

Allow them to choose what they want to wear from a limited selection of outfits. If he or she has a favorite outfit or clothing item, consider buying multiples or the same style in a few different colors.

Store some clothes in another room to reduce the number of options they have to choose from. Too many options can overwhelm Alzheimer’s patients who are trying to make a decision. Keep only a couple of outfits in their closet or dresser.

Arrange clothing items in the order they are put on to help guide them through the process.

Choose clothing that is comfortable, easy to get on and off, and easy to care for. Dressing aids and adaptive clothing items featuring elastic waistbands and Velcro closures minimize struggles with finicky fasteners like buttons, zippers and shoe laces.

Personal Care and Dressing Products for Seniors

Eating/Nutrition

Ensuring that your loved one is eating enough nutritious foods and drinking enough fluids is a challenge. People with dementia literally begin to forget that they need to eat and drink. Complicating the issue may be dental problems or medications that decrease appetite or make food taste “funny.” The consequences of poor nutrition are many, including weight loss, irritability, sleeplessness, bladder or bowel problems, and disorientation.

Make meal and snack times part of the daily routine and schedule them around the same time every day. Instead of three big meals, try five or six smaller ones.

Make mealtimes a special time. Try flowers or soft music. Turn off loud radio programs and the TV.

Eating independently should take precedence over eating neatly or with “proper” table manners. Finger foods support independence. Pre-cut and season the food. Try using a straw or a child’s “sippy cup” if holding a glass has become difficult. Provide assistance only when necessary and allow plenty of time for meals.

Sit down and eat with your loved one. Often they will mimic your actions, and it makes the meal more pleasant to share it with someone.

Prepare foods with your loved one in mind. If they have dentures or trouble chewing or swallowing, use soft foods or cut food into bite-size pieces.

If chewing and swallowing are issues, try gently moving the person’s chin in a chewing motion or lightly stroking their throat to encourage them to swallow.

If loss of weight is a problem, offer nutritious high-calorie snacks between meals. Breakfast foods high in carbohydrates are often preferred. On the other hand, if the problem is weight gain, keep high-calorie foods out of sight. Instead, keep handy fresh fruits, veggie trays, and other healthy low-calorie snacks.

Address safety concerns

You’ll need to consider a range of potential hazards, and they’ll change over time. Is it safe for your loved one to drive? Is the recipient of your care prone to falling, or at risk of wandering and getting lost?

You eventually may need to make home modifications and acquire special equipment such as a hospital bed or lift chair. Useful tools also can help prevent wandering and other safety issues common to dementia patients.

Prevent falls . Some basic, low-cost changes include removing trip hazards such as throw rugs, making sure the home is well lit (use automatic nightlights) and installing safety features such as handrails, grab bars and adjustable shower seats.

Stop them from wandering. Six out of 10 people with dementia wander from home at least once, and many do so repeatedly, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. A predictable routine can help avoid disorientation and subsequent excursions. You might also consider installing remote door locks or alarms, or locks far above or below eye level. The Alzheimer’s Association offers a 24-hour nationwide emergency response system, MedicAlert with Wandering Support , for an annual subscription fee.

Anticipate other risks. Dementia brings with it particular worries about self-injury. To lower the risk, keep medications in a locked drawer or cabinet, disable the stove when not in use and lower the water heater temperature to 120 degrees Fahrenheit or less.

Recognize driving dangers. Impaired driving isn’t only a danger to the driver. It can and does harm others. Discuss your concerns with your loved one. If the person is resistant to giving up the car keys, consider asking a physician to weigh in. Be empathetic about the loss of freedom, a common fear.

Source: aarp.org

Toileting and Incontinence Care

As the disease progresses, many people with Alzheimer’s begin to experience toileting difficulties and reduced bladder and bowel control. Incontinence can be upsetting and embarrassing for a senior and difficult for their caregiver to address and manage. Sometimes incontinence is indicative of a physical illness, such as a urinary tract infection (UTI) , so be sure to discuss changes with their doctor as soon as possible.

Practice timed voiding where you create a bathroom schedule and stick to it as closely as possible. For example, take toileting breaks every three hours during the day, and don’t wait for the person to ask. This includes tracking when accidents happen to help plan ways of avoiding them.

Watch for nonverbal cues that an elder may have to go to the bathroom, such as restlessness or pulling at clothes, and act quickly.

To prevent nighttime accidents, limit fluid intake in the evening hours just before bedtime.

Plan ahead for outings. Look up restroom locations, have the senior wear simple, easy-to-remove clothing, and bring an extra set of clothes and incontinence supplies in case of an accident.

 

Source: agingcare.com

When to seek professional help

A person may require professional help if they need full assistance with daily and personal care activities.

People who have Alzheimer’s disease will require more care as their condition progresses. Caregivers may need assistance in performing physically demanding tasks, such as bathing, moving, or dressing a person.

Caregivers may want to consider seeking professional help if their loved one:

  • requires full assistance with daily and personal care activities
  • loses the ability to walk
  • experiences a seizure
  • unexpectedly loses a significant amount of body weight
  • experiences a fall or other type of injury
  • has periods of anxiety or agitation
  • tends to wander away or get lost

Caregivers who experience adverse health effects, such as chronic stress, fatigue, or depression, may require professional assistance.

Ultimately, it is up to the caregiver and their family to decide when to seek professional help.

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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When is it time for Memory Care?

When is it time for Memory Care?

How do you know when it’s the right time?

Knowing when someone with dementia should move into residential or nursing care can be difficult. The main thing to think about is whether your loved one’s needs are met at home; is moving into a care home in their best interest?

When should a person with dementia go into a care home?

If a person’s dementia has progressed far enough that they need more care and support than you can provide, it may be time for them to go into a care home. At this point, they may need 24-hour care.

Dementia is progressive, meaning the person with the condition will require more care and support as time goes on. As your loved one’s condition declines, their needs increase and you may not be able to fully meet these needs despite your best efforts.

This is one example of the number of reasons why it might be time for people with dementia to move into a care home. Other reasons include hospital admissions, worry about your loved one’s safety or their behaviour becomes unmanageable.

There is no cure for dementia and the physical and mental state of a person living with the condition will only worsen. There will never be a perfect time because of the stress and emotional difficulties , but if they need 24-hour supervision and support to stay safe and to ensure good quality of life, the only option may be to move into residential care.

One idea is to write a list of your loved one’s needs and if you are able to support them. For example:

My wife cannot safely go outside on her own – I can only take her outside in the mornings Can I guarantee she won’t leave the house without me? – No, it worries me when I’m not there If you go down the list and notice that you are unable to provide the care and support necessary for your loved one, taking into account your other commitments in life, it may the right time to consider residential care.

If your loved one is unable to live independently and cannot care for themselves anymore, moving into a residential setting will give them the benefit of 24-hour care and support. This will give you peace of mind that your loved one is safe and that they receive the right level of care.

Source: carehome.co.uk

Why It is Beneficial to Start a Memory Care Search Early

From finding and touring memory care residences to finalizing legal documents to managing the memory care move, it will take at least 2 months to sort out the logistics of moving your loved one into memory care. For most families, 3-4 months is more normal. Financial hurdles, like getting covered by Medicaid obtaining VA pension benefits other payment support will take even longer. Even with professional financial planning assistance , it can take 6 months to arrange payment.

If you are considering memory care at an unknown point in the future, then it is probably time to start investigating the process now.

It is highly advantageous to be prepared when the times comes for memory care rather than to be scrambling. The onset of the need for memory care is just as like to be sudden as it is to be gradual. Patient behavior can change dramatically accelerating the need for memory care. However, unexpected changes with primary caregivers is just as likely to initiative the need. Since many caregivers are spouses and elderly themselves and they often push themselves beyond their own limits, caregiver injuries are more common than thought.

Another benefit of starting early is that it can let your loved one actually have a say in the decision. Making the decision in later stages of the disease, when the largest stakeholder can’t communicate well because of symptoms, will only exacerbate emotions including the guilty feelings that often come with this change.

The sooner the preparation begins, the more likely it is to be a positive transition.

Source: dementiacarecentral.com

Concerns About Day-to-Day Care

The most common concern of family caregivers is that their loved one isn’t getting good care. This can be hard to adjust to, because while family caregivers typically care for one person, nursing assistants are usually assigned to eight or more people at a time. And while many have experience and are sensitive to the needs of the people in their care, some have little training.

The best way to deal with any concerns about care is to talk to the staff member involved in a calm way. Most of the time, the issue can be solved this way. If not, talk to the administrator or nursing director.

It’s also a good idea to build good relationships with the care providers. Remember that staff members work hard, have schedules and other pressures, and want to be treated with consideration and respect. Visit the facility often, and share what you know. Tell them what’s being done well, and gently let them know what you’d like to see and when you don’t see it.

Source: webmd.com

Caregiver stress

Caregiving for a loved one with memory care is a 24/7 occupation.

Without engaging in regular respite care , it becomes impossible to sustain the situation. Even with qualified, in-home care providers, those with mid to later stages of memory loss require increasing levels of medical assistance, and the enormity of unceasing tasks is more than almost any household can accommodate.

If you’re approaching, or have already reached, a point where caregiving is all-consuming, it’s time to consider memory care.

Similarly, if you find yourself a member of the “Sandwich Generation” , stuck between an aging parent requiring care, a job and the needs of your own family, memory care is a must or else you’ll quickly go from being a caregiver to needing a caregiver of your own.

As memory loss sets in, so do the abilities to drive a car , make grocery lists, prepare food, remember daily medications, or even remember to eat.

Losing track of days and times has a disastrous effect on the circadian rhythm, contributing to Sundowner’s syndrome, insomnia and other sleep disorders that take on toll on one’s health and well-being.

Physical signs include:

Rapid weight loss

Lack of food in the fridge or cabinets

Evidence of medication not taken (or overtaken)

Neglected personal hygiene

Hunched or sunken posture

Inexplicable bruises, breaks and/or injuries

Unpaid bills and missed appointments

The inability to remember how to get home or where one is going puts patients at risk for injury, getting lost or becoming victims of scams and potentially violent crimes.

Similarly, those with dementia are more prone to being injured at home and are less able to remember how to seek help, forgetting to press a “life alert’ button or how to use the phone to call 911.

If you find yourself worrying about a loved ones’ well-being on a regular basis, the transition to memory care brings peace of mind while simultaneously ensuring s/he is supported, attended to and cared for day-in and day-out.

Source: thememorycenter.com

Finding the right care home for someone with dementia

To find the best care home according to your loved one’s needs, the first thing to do is to request a needs assessment from your local council’s social services.

Your local authority will make recommendations about your loved one’s care and also conduct a financial assessment as they may contribute to some of the costs.

As mentioned earlier, planning in advance will make the choice of care home easier as you will have more information about your loved one’s preferences and wishes.

A residential care home will be able to provide personal care, such as washing and dressing while a nursing home have a qualified nurse on site 24-hours a day.

 

Source: carehome.co.uk

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Myths About Assisted Living

Myths About Assisted Living

Assisted Living Facts

Know the facts before it’s time for you or a loved one to think about assisted living.

Are you or a loved one thinking about moving into an assisted living facility? If you are, do some homework first, to make sure you pick the right setting for you.

Be better prepared to visit and choose the best facility suited for your taste.

Source: seniorcare.com

MYTH: When you move away from family, no one will be around to help.

If you have gotten used to having loved ones provide you assistance, the prospect of moving away from them and into a strange place can be very daunting indeed. You need to remember (or remind your loved one) that you are moving into a community with security and helpful staff that are available 24-7. Rather than suffering from isolation and less help, you may have more help than you know what to do with. All of our facilities are equipped with special features that make it easy to get help quickly if you find yourself in a pinch. These are features you won’t be able to benefit from in your home. Assisted living is better!

Source: heritageassistedlivingnj.com

MYTH: Living at Home Is Less Expensive

Reality: Monthly expenses to maintain a home are higher than many seniors realize, and when combined with potential at-home care costs, living in their current home may end up being the most expensive option. According to the 2017 Genworth Cost of Care Survey , the national median annual cost for homemaker services is $47,934, and a home health aide costs $49,192. Plus, even if the mortgage has been paid off, utilities, homeowner taxes, maintenance and insurance payments add up.

Assisted living costs vary greatly depending on the type of residence, the size of the apartment, the types of services needed and the geographical location of the community. But the cost includes 24-hour supervision and security, daily meals, basic housekeeping, laundry, health and exercise programs and social programs, transportation, and access to medical services. It’s important to ask each community about their individual costs and services.

Source: arborsassistedliving.com

MYTH: Assisted Living Is Depressing and Residents Are Lonely

Many adult children of senior parents resist the idea of assisted living because they don’t want to “abandon” their parents, and many seniors fear that their loved ones will forget them and never visit. At Arbor Terrace, nothing could be further from the truth! We encourage our residents to maintain close relationships with their loved ones. We are always happy to facilitate family get-togethers or provide suggestions for things to do in the Asheville area. Between visits, our residents never have to be on their own! Arbor Terrace strives to be a true community, and there are plenty of opportunities to make new friends and stay connected, from mealtimes to book clubs to community outings.

Source: arborcompany.com

MYTH: Wheelchair dependent or have urinary incontinence

Assisted living allows for wheelchairs. They do not allow those who need more than one staff member to assist them in getting in and out of the chair. Persons living with urinary incontinence can live in the ALF as long as the issue is easily managed by the resident.

Source: seniorcare.com

MYTH: There’s No Socialization

Socialization is the backbone of assisted living communities. Loneliness has a serious impact on the mental and physical health of seniors. Living alone is the single biggest risk factor for extreme loneliness in seniors. Assisted living for seniors allows them to maintain their privacy and independence, but it also provides many opportunities for socialization with activities and close proximity to peers.

Source: discoveryvillages.com

MYTH: The food will be terrible

Truth: Many assume that since they’ll no longer be able to cook their own food at home, the quality of the food they’ll be eating will decrease but this won’t be the case at a good assisted living facility. Nutritionists and dining teams ensure that the food your loved one eats will be full of both variety and the nutrients they need to help maintain their health. These facilities will provide three meals a day, and will provide reminders and escorts to meal times so your loved one won’t forget to eat.

Source: lorettocny.org

Now that we’ve debunked some of the most common assisted living myths, it’s time to talk about choosing the best community for you. Braley Care Homes provides professional care in a home-like environment, which is crucial to preserving our residents’ dignity and self-worth. We believe this can best be done in smaller environments, rather than large facilities. The home setting is the environment we choose to care for your loved one. They can surround themselves with pictures and furniture for that complete home feeling. Our intimate, home-like atmosphere allows for individualized care and lasting relationships.

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678