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Hospice Care for Those with End Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

Hospice Care for Those with End Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

Hospice Care for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

If you are reading this, it is likely you or someone you love has been waging a difficult physical and emotional battle against Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Hospice serves those in the end stages of dementia, relieving pain, controlling symptoms, improving quality of life and reducing anxiety and worry for patients and their families.

Considering the slow decline of a patient with dementia, it can be difficult to determine when the time is right for hospice. In general, hospice patients are thought to have six months or less to live. Only a doctor can make a clinical determination of life expectancy. However, look for these common signs that the disease has progressed to a point where all involved would likely benefit from hospice care for dementia:

The patient can say only a few words

The patient can no longer walk and may be bed-bound

The patient is totally dependent on others for eating, dressing and grooming

The patient shows signs of severe anxiety

Are you a healthcare provider?

Source: vitas.com

What is hospice care?

Increasingly, people are choosing hospice care at the end of life. Hospice care focuses on the care, comfort, and quality of life of a person with a serious illness who is approaching the end of life.

At some point, it may not be possible to cure a serious illness, or a patient may choose not to undergo certain treatments. Hospice is designed for this situation. The patient beginning hospice care understands that his or her illness is not responding to medical attempts to cure it or to slow the disease’s progress.

Like palliative care, hospice provides comprehensive comfort care as well as support for the family, but, in hospice, attempts to cure the person’s illness are stopped. Hospice is provided for a person with a terminal illness whose doctor believes he or she has six months or less to live if the illness runs its natural course.

It’s important for a patient to discuss hospice care options with their doctor. Sometimes, people don’t begin hospice care soon enough to take full advantage of the help it offers. Perhaps they wait too long to begin hospice and they are too close to death. Or, some people are not eligible for hospice care soon enough to receive its full benefit. Starting hospice early may be able to provide months of meaningful care and quality time with loved ones.

Source: nia.nih.gov

When is your dementia patient ready for hospice care?

Alzheimer’s disease and other progressive dementias are life-altering and eventually fatal conditions for which curative therapy is not available. Patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s are eligible for hospice care when they show all of the following characteristics:1

Unable to ambulate without assistance

Unable to dress without assistance

Unable to bathe properly

Incontinence of bowel and bladder

Unable to speak or communicate meaningfully (ability to speak is limited to approximately a half dozen or fewer intelligible and different words)

Thinking of dementia as a terminal illness from which patients will decline over a matter of years, rather than months, allows healthcare professionals to focus explicitly and aggressively on a palliative care plan.2

Source: vitas.com

Plan in Advance

The best way to get ready for the final stages of your loved one’s Alzheimer’s disease is to talk to them about their wishes as soon as possible. Ask what medical treatments they want or don’t want.

Help them fill out the legal documents that spell out their wishes, called advance directives. If they can’t understand, then use what you know about them to decide what they might prefer.

Some other important things you’ll need to do include:

Talk regularly to your loved one’s primary doctor about the outlook and timetable for their illness.

Get their will and other financial plans in order.

Decide if it would be better for your loved one to die at home or in a place like a hospital or nursing home. If you decide on home care, know that you can change your mind if it gets too hard.

Find out about hospice, palliative care, and other services available in your area and what yourinsurancewill cover.

Decide what hospice or palliative care team you’d like to care for them. If they haveMedicare, make sure the service or hospice you choose is Medicare-certified.

Decide which funeral home you’ll use and what the funeral plans will be.

Source: webmd.com

Hospice Care for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

If you are reading this, it is likely you or someone you love has been waging a difficult physical and emotional battle against Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Hospice serves those in the end stages of dementia, relieving pain, controlling symptoms, improving quality of life and reducing anxiety and worry for patients and their families.

Considering the slow decline of a patient with dementia, it can be difficult to determine when the time is right for hospice. In general, hospice patients are thought to have six months or less to live. Only a doctor can make a clinical determination of life expectancy. However, look for these common signs that the disease has progressed to a point where all involved would likely benefit from hospice care for dementia:

The patient can say only a few words

The patient can no longer walk and may be bed-bound

The patient is totally dependent on others for eating, dressing and grooming

The patient shows signs of severe anxiety

Are you a healthcare provider?

Source: vitas.com

What is hospice care?

Increasingly, people are choosing hospice care at the end of life. Hospice care focuses on the care, comfort, and quality of life of a person with a serious illness who is approaching the end of life.

At some point, it may not be possible to cure a serious illness, or a patient may choose not to undergo certain treatments. Hospice is designed for this situation. The patient beginning hospice care understands that his or her illness is not responding to medical attempts to cure it or to slow the disease’s progress.

Like palliative care, hospice provides comprehensive comfort care as well as support for the family, but, in hospice, attempts to cure the person’s illness are stopped. Hospice is provided for a person with a terminal illness whose doctor believes he or she has six months or less to live if the illness runs its natural course.

It’s important for a patient to discuss hospice care options with their doctor. Sometimes, people don’t begin hospice care soon enough to take full advantage of the help it offers. Perhaps they wait too long to begin hospice and they are too close to death. Or, some people are not eligible for hospice care soon enough to receive its full benefit. Starting hospice early may be able to provide months of meaningful care and quality time with loved ones.

Source: nia.nih.gov

When is your dementia patient ready for hospice care?

Alzheimer’s disease and other progressive dementias are life-altering and eventually fatal conditions for which curative therapy is not available. Patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s are eligible for hospice care when they show all of the following characteristics:1

Unable to ambulate without assistance

Unable to dress without assistance

Unable to bathe properly

Incontinence of bowel and bladder

Unable to speak or communicate meaningfully (ability to speak is limited to approximately a half dozen or fewer intelligible and different words)

Thinking of dementia as a terminal illness from which patients will decline over a matter of years, rather than months, allows healthcare professionals to focus explicitly and aggressively on a palliative care plan.2

Source: vitas.com

Plan in Advance

The best way to get ready for the final stages of your loved one’s Alzheimer’s disease is to talk to them about their wishes as soon as possible. Ask what medical treatments they want or don’t want.

Help them fill out the legal documents that spell out their wishes, called advance directives. If they can’t understand, then use what you know about them to decide what they might prefer.

Some other important things you’ll need to do include:

Talk regularly to your loved one’s primary doctor about the outlook and timetable for their illness.

Get their will and other financial plans in order.

Decide if it would be better for your loved one to die at home or in a place like a hospital or nursing home. If you decide on home care, know that you can change your mind if it gets too hard.

Find out about hospice, palliative care, and other services available in your area and what yourinsurancewill cover.

Decide what hospice or palliative care team you’d like to care for them. If they haveMedicare, make sure the service or hospice you choose is Medicare-certified.

Decide which funeral home you’ll use and what the funeral plans will be.

Source: webmd.com

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Normal Aging vs Early Signs of Dementia

Normal Aging vs Early Signs of Dementia

The Truth About Aging and Dementia

As we age, our brains change, but Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias are not an inevitable part of aging. In fact, up to 40% of dementia cases may be prevented or delayed. It helps to understand what’s normal and what’s not when it comes to brain health.

Normal brain aging may mean slower processing speeds and more trouble multitasking, but routine memory, skills, and knowledge are stable and may even improve with age. It’s normal to occasionally forget recent events such as where you put your keys or the name of the person you just met.

In the United States, 6.2 million people age 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease, the most common type of dementia. People with dementia have symptoms of cognitive decline that interfere with daily life—including disruptions in language, memory, attention, recognition, problem solving, and decision-making.
Source: cdc.gov

The differences between normal aging and dementia

If you are experiencing difficulties with memory, know that they may not be signs of dementia. It could be memory loss as a part of normal aging.

If you are concerned that you or someone you know has dementia, please talk to your doctor.

Source: alzheimer.ca

What is aging?

Aging is a natural process of our lives. As we age, we experience gradual changes to our brains and bodies. Some of these changes affect our physical and mental abilities, and may increase our risk of disease.

Each one of us experiences aging differently. The extent of how we experience changes due to aging, and the point in our lives when they start becoming more noticeable, varies from person to person.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), each person should have the ability to live a long and healthy life. This is considered healthy aging.

Source: alzheimer.ca

Memory, Forgetfulness, and Aging: What’s Normal and What’s Not?

Many older adults worry about their memory and other thinking abilities. For example, they might be concerned about taking longer than before to learn new things, or they may sometimes forget to pay a bill. These changes are usually signs of mild forgetfulness — often a normal part of aging — not serious memory problems.

Source: nia.nih.gov

What’s normal forgetfulness and what’s not?

What’s the difference between normal, age-related forgetfulness and a serious memory problem? It’s normal to forget things once in a while as we age, but serious memory problems make it hard to do everyday things like driving, using the phone, and finding your way home.

Talk with your doctor to determine whether memory and other cognitive problems, such as the ability to clearly think and learn, are normal and what may be causing them.

Signs that it might be time to talk to a doctor include:

Asking the same questions over and over again

Getting lost in places a person knows well

Having trouble following recipes or directions

Becoming more confused about time, people, and places

Not taking care of oneself —eating poorly, not bathing, or behaving unsafely

Source: nia.nih.gov

Normal Aging vs. Dementia

While some mild changes in cognition are considered a normal part of the aging process, . Normal age-related declines are subtle and mostly affect the speed of thinking and attentional control. In abnormal aging, declines in cognition are more severe and may include other thinking abilities, such as rapid forgetting or difficulties navigating, solving common problems, expressing oneself in conversation or behaving outside of social rules. Abnormal aging can also include the motor system resulting in excessive tripping, falls or tremor. Often it is difficult to determine exactly when a person should be concerned with cognitive changes they may be experiencing. Symptoms vary from person to person – what is normal for one person may not be normal for another. This contributes to the challenges clinicians face when determining whether what someone is experiencing is a significant dementia or not.

Source: memory.ucsf.edu

When Forgetfulness Is a Problem

If memory loss makes it hard for you to handle your daily tasks, that’s a sign you shouldn’t ignore. Are you forgetting things you only just heard? Asking the same question over and over again? Relying on lots of paper or electronic reminders just to get through the day? Talk to your doctor if you or your family notices that happening to you.

 

Source: webmd.com

Signs of Dementia

Sometimes, there does come a point at which forgetfulness becomes more prominent and affects daily life. These symptoms can point to dementia. Some signs of a more serious problem, such as dementia, include:

Not being able to remember a recent conversation or event, or forgetting what’s happening while it’s happening

Being unable to learn or remember new information

Having significant language issues, such as struggling to have a conversation because of word-finding problems

Experiencing significant mood or personality changes such as depression, anxiety, or intense irritability

Appearing apathetic or withdrawn

Frequently pausing when talking

Forgetting family members’ names

Often getting lost and needing help finding one’s way

Experiencing significant declines in reaction time, which may affect driving, cooking, or the ability to recover from tripping and falling

The key to understanding what is normal aging and what could be dementia is evaluating how it affects daily life. For example, if your loved one is anxious because they can no longer manage their checkbook or monthly bills, you should speak with a physician.

Are you caring for someone with dementia? The Caregiver’s Complete Guide to Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care includes tips to help you accommodate your loved one’s changing needs.

Source: arborcompany.com

The different levels of memory loss

Age-associated memory impairment

If you are experiencing difficulties with memory, but:

They are not noticeably disrupting your daily life,

They are not affecting your ability to complete tasks as you usually would,

You have no difficulty learning and remembering new things and

There’s no underlying medical condition that is causing your memory problems,

Then you have what’s known as age-associated memory impairment.

Age-associated memory impairment is considered to be a normal part of aging. It doesn’t mean you have dementia.

Though you may have difficulties remembering things on occasion, like where you left your keys, a password for a website or the name of a former classmate, these are not signs you have dementia. You may not remember things as quickly as you used to, but most of the time there is no cause for concern.

Source: alzheimer.ca

When to visit the doctor for memory loss

If you, a family member, or friend has problems remembering recent events or thinking clearly, talk with a doctor. He or she may suggest a thorough checkup to see what might be causing the symptoms. You may also wish to talk with your doctor about opportunities to participate in research on cognitive health and aging.

At your doctor visit, he or she can perform tests and assessments, which may include a brain scan, to help determine the source of memory problems. Your doctor may also recommend you see a neurologist, a doctor who specializes in treating diseases of the brain and nervous system.

Memory and other thinking problems have many possible causes, including depression, an infection, or medication side effects. Sometimes, the problem can be treated, and cognition improves. Other times, the problem is a brain disorder, such as Alzheimer’s disease, which cannot be reversed.

Finding the cause of the problems is important for determining the best course of action. Once you know the cause, you can make the right treatment plan. People with memory problems should make a follow-up appointment to check their memory every six to 12 months. They can ask a family member, friend, or the doctor’s office to remind them if they’re worried they’ll forget.

Learn more about cognitive health and Alzheimer’s and related dementias.

 

Source: nia.nih.gov

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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How Does Dementia Affect Communication

How does dementia affect communication? 

How does dementia affect communication? 

As human beings, we communicate with each other using an array of verbal and non-verbal communication. From our facial expressions and body language to the words we speak and tone we use, these are the tools we often take for granted to help us express ourselves and feel understood.

All forms of dementia can affect communication in all kinds of different ways. Although this can be challenging and sometimes frustrating or distressing – there are ways that you can help to support and maintain communication.

Source: liftedcare.com

Why is communication important?

Communication is a vital part of our lives. It allows us to express who we are and relate to one another. Communication is more than talking and listening – it involves understanding and interpreting.

When a person living with dementia is having trouble expressing themselves or understanding what is being communicated, try these tips to help you stay connected.

 

Source: alzheimer.ca

Communicating well with a person with dementia

How does dementia affect communication?

Dementia can make it more difficult to communicate with others. As dementia progresses it becomes harder for a person to tell others about themselves and to understand what others are saying to them. This leads to people feeling cut off and isolated.

Source: scie.org.uk

Behavior as communication

At this stage, behaviors are often the only way to communicate what is on the person’s mind. These are called dementia-related behaviors. They are messages about ideas, feelings, and needs, and he is telling you in the best way he can the only way he can.

For instance, a caregiver who provides personal care (bathing, toileting) too quickly causes frustration for the person living with dementia; he can’t process what is happening. Frustration can turn to resistance, anger, and even aggression, all of which may be avoided if the caregiver understands the needs of the person in his or her care, which in the case of this example is simply to move slower and with greater care.

Source: hopehospice.com

How to approach communication with people living with dementia

Believe that communication is possible at all stages of dementia:

What a person says or does and how a person behaves has meaning.

Never lose sight of the person and what they are trying to tell you.

The key to positive conversations with people living with dementia isrespectful, sensitive and consistent communication.

Difficulties with communication can be discouraging for the person living with dementia and families, so consider creative ways to understand and connect with each other. In the video below, listen to what other caregivers have to say about caring for and communicating with people living with dementia.

The strategies discussed in the video above, as well as the tips listed below, are successful because they are based on a person-centred philosophy that views people living with dementia first and foremost as individuals, with unique attributes, personal values and history.

We also recommend learning as much as you can about dementia, its progression and how it can change the abilities of a person. As abilities change, you can learn to interpret the person’s messages by paying attention to both verbal and non-verbal cues.

Source: alzheimer.ca

The right environment

When communicating with a person with dementia, try to:

avoid competing noises, such as TV or radio

stay still while you are talking – this makes it easier for the person with dementia to follow what you are saying

maintain regular routines – this helps to minimise confusion and can assist communication

keep a consistent approach – it is much less confusing for the person with dementia if everyone uses the same style of communication. Repeating the message in exactly the same way is important for all the family and carers.

Source: betterhealth.vic.gov.au

 

Listening to and understanding someone with dementia

Communication is a two-way process. As a carer of someone with dementia, you will probably have to learn to listen more carefully.

You may need to be more aware of non-verbal messages, such as facial expressions and body language. You may have to use more physical contact, such as reassuring pats on the arm, or smile as well as speaking.

Active listening can help:

use eye contact to look at the person, and encourage them to look at you when either of you are talking

try not to interrupt them, even if you think you know what they’re saying

stop what you’re doing so you can give the person your full attention while they speak

minimise distractions that may get in the way of communication, such as the television or the radio playing too loudly, but always check if it’s OK to do so

repeat what you heard back to the person and ask if it’s accurate, or ask them to repeat what they said

Source: nhs.uk

Will communication get harder?

As time goes on, communication will likely become more difficult for someone with dementia. Although dementia can take years to advance over several stages, symptoms can worsen in each subsequent stage.

Source: liftedcare.com

The silver lining

As with much of life, there is a silver lining to the reality of dementia-related language decline. The brain’s temporal lobe is two-sided. The left side deteriorates while the right side remains intact, often to the end of the dementia journey. The right side enables a person to engage in basic social chit-chat, clap or toe-tap to the rhythm of music and poetry, and even dance.

A person living with dementia can find great comfort and joy in listening to his favorite music or singing along to songs from his past. It’s not uncommon for a person to retain the ability to recite favorite scriptures or poems, even word for word. This can happen even in persons who are otherwise non-verbal.

Care partners can learn new ways to interact with their loved ones who have dementia by engaging in activities that rely on the right side of the temporal lobe.

Source: hopehospice.com

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Stimulating Activities for Alzheimer’s Patients

Stimulating Activities for Alzheimer’s Patients

No one wants to end up with a debilitating disease, particularly one like Alzheimer’s. Are there steps that can be taken to slow the disease’s progression?

Experts say the main thing people can do to prevent or slow down Alzheimer’s disease is to stimulate their brains.

Whether a person is in a care facility or receiving home care services, brain stimulation activities can and should be done on a regular basis.

Source: skylarkseniorcare.com

 

stimulating activities for alzheimers

Exercise and physical activity

Exercise and physical activity can have lots of benefits for people with Alzheimers. It can help regulate their sleep and prevent restlessness and sleeplessness in the evening. It can also help maintain a positive mood and lower the risk of them developing depression.

Physical activities may include:

Walking around their neighborhood or a local park

Depending on age and fitness, you could try tandem biking

Water aerobics – health and fitness centers often have workshops and classes specifically for elderly people or people with Alzheimers

Fishing

Source: supercarers.com

Work on Puzzles

We love puzzles because they’re like exercise for the brain. A person has to exercise their problem-solving ability, as well as making sense of the shapes to complete the picture in front of them.

Source: skylarkseniorcare.com

Reminisce about their life

Long-term memory often remains stronger for longer in people living with Alzheimers. It can be wonderful to engage your loved ones in discussions or activities about their lives. It’s also a fantastic opportunity for you to learn more about your loved one.

Some ideas include:

Interview your loved one about their life using a video recorder

Talk to them about their life, their childhood, and their family

Look through photos and make a photo album

Watch family videos together

Ask them about their favorite memories around a particular topic, such as their favorite holiday or oldest friend

Source: supercarers.com

Simulate handy tasks
If your aging relative always loved to tinker, suggest a project with visible results. Painting wooden boards and fitting together PVC pipes are good activities for seniors with high motor function. Wooden or plastic play tools provide a similar experience for people with Alzheimers.

Untie knots
Tie loose knots along a thick rope. The elderly person may enjoy untying them, though avoid making the knots too tight or using a rough rope.

Connect with others: Make phone or video calls to friends and loved ones. Host a virtual tea, coffee time, or happy hour. Take the time to write them a note or card. Chances are, they’re bored at home, too, and will welcome the connection!

Read the Newspaper Together

This may not seem like a big deal, but reading is also a form of mental exercise. Reading about current events can help stimulate both memories and emotions as well.

Source: skylarkseniorcare.com

Perseverance and flexibility are key

If your loved one isn’t interested in the activity or seems resistant, just take a break and try again later. You could also try a different activity or ask your loved one how you could make this one more enjoyable for them. You should also focus on the process of the activity, not the results – what matters most is that your loved one enjoys the time and feels useful.

 

Source: supercarers.com

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Tips for Seniors to Maintain Good Health​

Tips for Seniors to Maintain Good Health​

Staying healthy is important at any age, but for seniors, it is even more important for living a long, happy, and active life. Here are tips to help maintain good health as you age.

Source: bannerhealth.com

Get active

Physical activity is an immune system booster. The more you move, the more your body is able to fight inflammation and infections.

The activity you partake in doesn’t have to be strenuous. Low impact exercises are effective, too.

You might consider biking, walking, swimming, or low impact aerobics. If you’re able to, engage in moderate intensity exercise for about 20 to 30 minutes a day to reach the recommended total of 150 minutes a weekTrusted Source

Modify your exercise routine to find what feels best for you.

Source: healthline.com

Eat healthy

Maintaining a healthy diet as you age is essential for living well . The digestive system slows down with age, so it becomes necessary to incorporate important vitamins and high-fiber foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains into your loved one’s diet. Not only does adding fiber help seniors with maintaining a healthy diet, but it also can lower the risk of major health problems like stroke and heart disease.

Another health secret for seniors is to stay hydrated. Because they tend to generally feel less thirsty as they age, seniors are prone to dehydration . Make sure your loved one drinks plenty of water to stay energized and to avoid constipation and urinary tract infections.

Lack of appetite is a common cause of poor senior nutrition. It’s important to first address the causes of appetite decline in older people , according to research from the National Institute of Health Research. There can be many causes, but researchers concluded that simply improving the “mealtime ambiance” and “enhancing the flavor of food” can work wonders for a senior’s appetite.

Along with trying these tips to stimulate appetite in the elderly , you can really help support healthy eating habits by:

Encouraging shared mealtimes with friends and family

Offering visually appealing food

Suggesting a regular schedule for meals, snacks, and drinks

Source: aplaceformom.com

Maintain strong bones

Most of us really don’t think about our bones until one breaks. However, bone health, like other aspects of your health, needs to be worked on for years. The good news is that it’s never too late to take care of your bones and slow bone loss. 

Want to know more about your risk for osteoporosis? Talk to your doctor about a DEXA bone density scan. It is a common screening test for women over 65 and can help predict your risk of fractures or osteoporosis.

Source: bannerhealth.com

Get plenty of rest

Not only can sleep reduce your stress level, but sleep is how your body repairs itself. For this reason, getting an adequate amount of sleep can result in a stronger immune system, making it easier for your body to fight off viruses.

Sleep is also important as you get older because it can improve memory and concentration. Aim for at least seven and a half to nine hours of sleep per night.

If you have trouble sleeping, talk to your doctor to find the underlying cause. Causes of insomnia can include inactivity during the day and too much caffeine. Or it can be a sign of a medical condition like sleep apnea or restless leg syndrome.

Source: healthline.com

Keep medications organized and safe

Especially as we age, you might need to take different medications to manage different health conditions. It’s important to review your medications regularly with your pharmacist and your health care provider to make sure everything is necessary and to identify possible interactions.

Learn more about safely managing your medications:

The Top Warning Signs You Might Be Taking Too Many Medications

The Importance of Taking Your Medications as Prescribed

Why You Should Never Throw Away That Medication Package Insert

Do you have diabetes? Managing your medications and insulin can present some unique challenges. Here are “6 Medication Safety Tips for Older Adults with Diabetes”.

Source: bannerhealth.com

Remember cognitive health

Staying mentally active and learning new skills may even lead to improved thinking ability , according to the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health. Seniors should keep their minds sharp through various brain games and other engaging activities: Completing crossword puzzles, reading, writing, and trying new hobbies can stimulate seniors’ minds and help them engage with their surrounding environment to ward off cognitive decline.

Source: aplaceformom.com

Visit the dentist every 6 months

The risk for cavities goes up with age. Furthermore, oral health is directly related to overall health : Many mouth infections can be linked to serious health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The American Dental Association outlines the various concerns seniors over 60 should have regarding their oral health . Lastly, in addition to brushing and flossing daily, seniors should regularly see their local dentist to maintain healthy teeth and gums.

Source: aplaceformom.com

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

Categories
Uncategorized

How Seniors Can Prevent Falls at Home

How Seniors Can Prevent Falls at Home

Did you know that one in four older Americans falls every year? Falls are the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries for people aged 65+. Falls can result in hip fractures, broken bones, and head injuries. And even falls without a major injury can cause an older adult to become fearful or depressed, making it difficult for them to stay active. If you have an aging parent, grandparent, or neighbor in your life, helping them reduce their risk of falling is a great way to help them stay healthy and independent for as long as possible.

The good news about falls is that most of them can be prevented. The key is to know where to look. Here are some common factors that can lead to a fall:

  • Balance and gait: As we age, most of us lose some coordination, flexibility, and balance— primarily through inactivity, making it easier to fall.
  • Vision: In the aging eye, less light reaches the retina—making contrasting edges, tripping hazards, and obstacles harder to see.
  • Medications: Some prescriptions and over-the-counter medications can cause dizziness, dehydration, or interactions with each other that can lead to a fall.
  • Environment: Most seniors have lived in their homes for a long time and have never thought about simple modifications that might keep it safer as they age.
  • Chronic conditions: More than 80% of older adults have at least one chronic condition like diabetes, stroke, or arthritis. Often, these increase the risk of falling because they result in lost function, inactivity, depression, pain, or multiple medications.

Fall Prevention: Why Older Adults Fall & What to Do

To be honest, people don’t usually ask me this.

Instead, they want to know things like “How do I keep my mother from falling?” or “What should I do? My grandfather’s been falling.”

After all, falls are a scary thing. Most people know that falls are dangerous for older adults.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) reports that one in five falls causes a serious injury such as a broken bone or head injury. Fear of falling can also seriously affect an aging adult’s quality of life and sadly, can keep a person from being active and thriving.

So, many older adults and family caregivers are interested in fall prevention because the risks are so great. And the good news is that although it’s not possible to prevent all falls, it almost always IS possible to take actions that will reduce the chance of a bad fall.

If you want to learn more, you’re in the right place.

In this post, I’ll cover:

How understanding why aging adults fall can help you keep an older parent — or yourself — safer,

Why personalized fall prevention plans work better than relying on general fall prevention tips,

The four-step process I use to help older adults prevent falls,

A practical example showing you how to use these steps to avoid falls yourself.

Source: betterhealthwhileaging.net

What are some causes of falls?

The normal changes of aging, like poor eyesight or poor hearing, can make you more likely to fall. Illnesses and physical conditions can affect your strength and balance. Poor lighting or throw rugs in your home can make you more likely to trip or slip.

The side effects of some medicines can upset your balance and make you fall. Medicines for depression, sleep problems and high blood pressure often cause falls. Some medicines for diabetes and heart conditions can also make you unsteady on your feet.

You may be more likely to fall if you are taking four or more medicines. You are also likely to fall if you have changed your medicine within the past two weeks.

Source: aafp.org

What are some of the interventions you’ve used that can help seniors?

You can do so many things. First of all, I tell everybody you’ve got to do some balance training. Tai chi is probably the best exercise to prevent falls, but whatever works for you. And, interestingly, just walking does not reduce your risk of falling. So a lot of doctors will say, “Just get out and walk 20 minutes every day, and that’ll keep you safe. That’ll help you stay healthy.” Walking is great for your heart; it’s great for your brain; it’s great for lots of it. But in order to really reduce your risk for falls, you’ve got to do something specific to balance.

Enlist their support in taking simple steps to stay safe.

Ask your older loved one if they’re concerned about falling. Many seniors recognize that falling is a risk, but they believe it won’t happen to them or they won’t get hurt—even if they’ve already fallen in the past. If they’re concerned about falling, dizziness, or balance, suggest that they discuss it with their health care provider who can assess their risk and suggest programs or services that could help.

Discuss their current health conditions.

Find out if your older loved one is experiencing any problems with managing their own health. Are they having trouble remembering to take their medications—or are they experiencing side effects? Is it getting more difficult for them to do things they used to do easily? Also make sure they’re taking advantage of all the preventive benefits now offered under Medicare, such as the Annual Wellness visit. Encourage them to speak openly with their health care provider about all of their concerns.

Here are some ways to help prevent falls for your older loved ones:

Make sure to Clean up clutter. 

The easiest way to prevent falls is to keep your home neat and tidy. Remove all clutter, such as stacks of old newspapers and magazines, especially from hallways and staircases.

Avoid loose clothing. 

You want to feel comfortable at home, but very baggy clothes can sometimes make you more likely to fall. Opt for better-fitting and properly hemmed clothing that doesn’t bunch up or drag on the ground.

Install safety devices. 

Bathrooms can be dangerous when wet. A simple non-slip mat can create a more accessible surface for our feet to grip. Grab bars and handrails should also be considered in high-risk areas.

Check your eyes. 

Like everything else, our eyesight changes with aging. Because other health issues can seem more pressing, it is easy for seniors to overlook an annual eye exam. Good eyesight is essential for maintaining balance.

Use an assistance device.  

You might not want to use a walker, but it beats not being able to get around independently. Find one that works for your lifestyle and situation if you need a device.

CONCLUSION

Even with reasonable preventive measures, accidents can happen. If you are living at home alone or your partner can’t get to you quickly in an emergency, consider how you will be able to call 911 if you fall. Keeping a phone in your pocket or wearing an alarm device can be lifesaving.

If you fall, you will likely need to work with an orthopedic doctor and possibly a physical therapist. Together, they can help treat the injury and help you restore mobility.

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Coping With the Decision to Put Your Parent in a Nursing Home​

Coping With the Decision to Put Your Parent in a Nursing Home​

There’s no doubt that wrangling the decision over the most suitable care for your parent can feel like a mammoth task: one in which there are no winners.

The result of this decision often leaves you with a hefty dose of guilt. While outsiders can easily see the logic of the situation, and therefore often see it as a clear-cut decision, you feel the emotion.

It’s difficult to pull out the different contributing factors and assuage the guilt. However, as we’ve learned from our experience of countless adult children dealing with the guilt of putting a parent in a nursing home at our nursing homes in Somerset, there are ways to manage the guilt effectively and come to feel content with your decision.

Source: eastleighcarehomes.co.uk

How to Deal With Guilt Over Nursing Home Placement

Realize that you didn’t cause your loved one’s illnesses or age-related decline. Whether facing age-related issues or a progressive illness like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, your loved one would still have to deal with their declining health whether you continued functioning as their sole caregiver or chose to bring in outside help.

Understand that professional care is often a necessary next step.A higher level of care provides both increased safety and comfort for an aging or ill loved one. Nursing homes don’t accept just any seniors. These long-term care facilities conduct thorough needs assessments of potential residents prior to move-in. If your parent is admitted because they require skilled nursing care and consistent supervision, then a nursing home is the appropriate setting for them. Yes, there are alternatives, such as around-the-clock in-home health care, but they are often cost-prohibitive. (Keep in mind that professional help is also necessary for you to avoid caregiver burnout and have a life and relationships outside of caregiving.)

Take time to acknowledge and appreciate that you are doing the best you can. Being the primary caregiver for a parent is a huge responsibility. We must make decisions about situations that we’ve never encountered before and handle matters that often seem to have no right or wrong answers. Once we’ve made a careful decision, we must endure the consequences. This may mean lots of fast-paced changes or it might mean maintaining the status quo for the time being. You’ve taken on a difficult role and you’re doing your best to make decisions based on the information and resources you currently have.

Learn to understand that you can’t live life for other human beings. You can only help so much. Total control of events isn’t in your hands. There might not be a solution that makes everyone happy or solves every problem. Do your best to handle what is within your abilities, and then let the rest go.

Realistically assess your options. Most elders will be resistant to the idea of entering a nursing home. Long-term care facilities get a bad rap, but they provide a very important service for families. If you come to find that your loved one is being cared for in a substandard facility, or that they may be experiencing abuse or neglect, contact the long-term care ombudsman responsible for your area. 

If your parent is being well cared for, then let the facility do its job. The bulk of your loved one’s care is the nursing home’s responsibility now. Visit often, advocate for them, and do small things to brighten their day and make their life easier, but then move forward with your own life. You’ll have more energy and quality time to devote to all your relationships, and that benefits everyone.

What many family caregivers don’t realize is that your role doesn’t end with nursing home placement. You will still be part of their care team after they move. They will still need you as their advocate. Accept this newly defined caregiver role and the benefits it provides. A commitment to a life of your own will make you a more refreshed caregiver and protect against caregiver burnout. A reputable nursing home will provide your Mom or Dad with the care and engagement that they require. That’s a winning situation for both sides, so put aside the guilt and regret.

Source: agingcare.com

Remember: You’re making sure they’ll be getting the level of care they need.

Moving someone to assisted living means you’ve failed to take care of them. doesn’t

It means you’re making a difficult decision to prioritize their health and safety and get them the level of care they need – a level that may no longer be possible at home over the long term.

Most likely, you’ll still be spending a lot of time with them, checking in with the staff, advocating for their needs, and managing their overall care.

You taking good care of your older adult and you certainly haven’t abandoned them. are

Source: dailycaring.com

How to Help Yourself Adjust to this Change

First, acknowledge that you’re coping with a significant adjustment. While this doesn’t change the situation, it can help to give yourself permission to pause and understand the challenge you’re facing.

Research shows that the caregiver burden can continue after nursing home placement, due to new challenges and demands. This demonstrates that although the placement may have been necessary for the care of the loved one, it won’t automatically “fix” the primary caregiver and make everything okay.

Find little, and perhaps new ways, to express your care and love. Maybe you can bring a newspaper or a flower every day to your loved one.

Identify someone to whom you can express your concerns, both outside of the facility and within it. Communication is important, and most facilities want to know what your concerns are. Learning how to advocate for your loved one is important and necessary, especially when he or she has dementia.

Acknowledge that even though your loved one may not have wanted to live in a facility, there could be some benefits to nursing home care. Although you may feel that nothing can compare with the level of care you gave your loved one at home, keep in mind that the care at a facility may still be good, quality care, and it’s available 24 hours a day. Some people find that their loved one actually improves in a facility because she’s getting the care consistently that family members wanted to provide but just couldn’t maintain effectively at home.

Help your loved one adjust to the facility. Work together to identify meaningful activities and routines for him or her to help facilitate the adjustment.

Consider developing a life story to share important people, events and information with the staff about your loved one.

Remind yourself of the ability now to focus, not only on your loved one’s physical-care needs but also on visiting and building your relationship with him or her.

Most caregivers feel it’s a privilege to care for their loved ones, and don’t want to be relieved of the job of providing the care, even if it’s physically and emotionally taxing. Acknowledging the possible mix of emotions including grief, loss, guilt, and relief, may allow for a healthier adjustment after the nursing home placement of a loved one.

Source: verywellhealth.com

daily activities for alzheimer's

Find the right home and care

One thing that will make you feel less guilty about moving your loved one into a nursing home, is knowing that you put them in the best facility. Don’t wait until the last minute to scout for a nursing home. The more time to make a decision, the less stressful you will be, and the easier it will be to find the right nursing home.

Do your due diligence when selecting a nursing home so that you can find the best one. Nursing homes have improved over time but you can’t always be too sure. So, learn about what to look for in a facility, to make sure your loved one gets the best care. Understand the different nursing home costs and make sure you visit several facilities before you make a decision.

If you are unsure about any of these decisions it’s important to seek out professional aged care advice.

Source: corevalue.com.au

Take care of yourself

Caring for someone can be a full-time job and can have negative effects on your own wellbeing, including your relationships with friends and family. Allow yourself to have a good time, this is likely

what your loved would want you to do. Although it is easy to neglect yourself when you care for a loved one, it is important to remember to look after yourself too.

Source: carehome.co.uk

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Managing Difficult Dementia Behaviors

Managing Difficult Dementia Behaviors

Dementia often causes difficult behaviors in those we love due to confusion or memory issues. Your loved one may also become more easily agitated, have mood swings, wander, try to manipulate the situation, or show poor judgment. These dementia behaviors—and several others—are normal. But, for caregivers, they create unique challenges. While you can’t take these behaviors away, you can use tools to manage them. 

Agitation is the most common reason Americans place loved ones with dementia in nursing homes. There are more than 5 million Americans with dementia,1 and 80% of them may develop behavioral symptoms such as aggression, hallucinations, or delusions at some point..

As the geriatric population grows, health care practitioners will increasingly encounter distressed caregivers of dementia patients asking for help in handling difficult behaviors. Though most agitation is probably a result of deteriorative changes, health care professionals can influence behaviors.

Here are ways to manage difficult dementia behaviors:

REASSURE the person. Put the person with dementia’s feelings first. He or she cannot change; YOU have to change, or you have to change the immediate environment.

Collect yourself (no matter how irritated you are). People with dementia are sensitive to others’ moods and will pick yours up and mirror it. So take a deep breath. Count to 3. Or do a silent scream in the bathroom. Remind yourself, “It’s not him/her. It’s the dementia!” 

Avoid making the mistake of assuming they’ll forget your angry moment. Although it’s true that people with dementia tend to quickly forget what was said, the emotional impact of an encounter (negative OR positive) lasts much longer! 

Do: 

Approach slowly and from the front. You’re less apt to startle, confuse, or provoke. 

Play back the person’s emotions and ask questions: “You sound upset.” “You look sad. Can I help?” “I know this bothers you. Let’s see what I can do.” 

Try developing a go-to mantra for soothing: “I’m here.” “Everything’s OK.” “Not to worry, love.” 

Make your body language match your words. Avoid sighing or rolling your eyes. Smile, nod, use a friendly tone, relax your posture. Unspoken factors convey more than half of any message. Try touching an arm or shoulder. 

Don’t: 

Say things like “Calm down!” This has the opposite effect — it raises anxiety. 

Ask, “What’s wrong?” When someone doesn’t know or can’t answer, it’s irritating. 

Try to reason with the person (no matter how tempting). Logic and argument will not work. Period.

Things to Keep in Mind When Dealing With Difficult Behaviors

What’s not okay? People with Alzheimer’s or dementia often exhibit behaviors that are unpredictable and may be outside the bounds of what others consider “normal” or socially acceptable. It may be tough to know when to worry and when to be flexible.

In general, try to remember that these behaviors do not define the person, they are just a product of the disease. If your loved one had the ability, they would probably choose to act differently.

Also, remember to practice patience and forgiveness. The disease, not the person, is likely causing these things to occur. Try to let things go and avoid holding a grudge over something they may not have meant to do or say, or even remember doing. The exception is if your loved one becomes a physical danger to themselves or others. Physically abusive behavior is not okay. Even a one-time occurrence should be communicated to your physician or other healthcare or mental health provider immediately to ensure your loved one’s safety as well as your own.

Finally, there are so many more behavior interventions, treatments and specialty care providers now than ever before. Don’t be afraid to reach out.

Wandering – How to Manage Wandering & Roaming

A stressful or over-stimulating environment can cause an individual with dementia to leave home or place of care without anyone noticing.

Stress can trigger disorientation and fear which may prompt a wandering episode.

Below are our strategies for management of dementia-induced wandering behavior:

  • Reduce noise in the home, including loud TVs, computers, or exhaust fans can prevent increased levels of stress and anxiety.
  • If they are able, encourage your loved one to engage in physical activity – exercise, dancing, or movement games – to reduce restlessness and promote restful sleep.
  • If your loved one begins pacing or appears distressed, offer reassurance he or she is secure and in a safe place.
  • Remove items commonly taken when leaving the home, such as keys, wallets, jewelry, and purses.
  • Talk to the doctor about pain treatment options. A dementia patient may be wandering in an attempt to escape pain and discomfort.

About Dementia & Wandering Behavior

As dementia progresses, it can be difficult for your loved one to remember major environmental and life changes.

They may mistakenly engage in old routines, such as leaving the house to go to work at a job they have long since retired from or to visit a store no longer in business.

In addition, wandering can be caused by pain and discomfort, a lack of physical activity or simply by searching for locations related to normal, daily activities, such as the bathroom or kitchen.

Considering the rapid rise in the rate of dementia and the toll it takes on individuals, families, caregivers and healthcare systems, it’s not surprising that experts are intent on exploring and testing new treatments and therapies. Non-drug approaches not only avoid the side effects of medication, there is increasing evidence that they help reduce challenging behaviours associated with dementia, making life a bit easier for people with dementia and their caregivers.

Change with Your Loved One

Every person’s progression with dementia is different. You may have to try several tactics or change your approach as your loved one changes. Keep a journal of behaviors to help you track triggers and resolutions. This may help you see the bigger picture and know when it’s time to adjust.

Sources:
https://walnutplacelcs.com/
https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/
https://betterhealthwhileaging.net/
https://www.todaysgeriatricmedicine.com/
https://crhcf.org/
https://www.alzheimers.net/
https://salmonhealth.com/
https://www.mcmasteroptimalaging.org/

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Daily Activities For A Loved One With Alzheimer’s​

Daily Activities For A Loved One With Alzheimer's

Doing things we enjoy gives us pleasure and adds meaning to our lives. People with Alzheimer’s disease need to be active and do things they enjoy. However, it’s not easy for them to plan their days and do different tasks.

 

People with Alzheimer’s may have trouble deciding what to do each day, which could make them fearful and worried or quiet and withdrawn, or they may have trouble starting tasks. Remember, the person is not being lazy. He or she might need help organizing the day or doing an activity.

 

Keep a Routine

Planning daily activities doesn’t come easily to people with Alzheimer’s. They also tend to prefer familiar habits, places, and tasks.

But daily routines help them focus on activities they find meaningful. If they know what to expect, it can also lessen frustration and improve their mood.

When you plan a daily routine for the person you care for, think about:

  • Their likes and dislikes
  • How they used to spend their days
  • Times of day they feel freshest: Things like bathing or going to a doctor’s appointment are easier when your loved one feels rested.
  • Regular times for waking up and going to sleep: Don’t let them nap several times during the day, or for long periods. This could disrupt their sense of day and night.

Place familiar objects around the house, such as family photos and mementos. These can make them feel more secure and connected.

Familiar smells and pastimes are also comforting. A favorite dessert and a TV show can be a pleasure for someone who always enjoyed those things after dinner or started their day that way, even if they can’t totally understand the show’s plot.

Pets

Here’s a source of unconditional love. Pets convey their needs in ways that everyone, including people with Alzheimer’s, easily understands, and they provide comfort. Relax by watching birds from a window or fish in an aquarium.

Encourage visual expression
Painting and drawing are ways to express feelings safely and with creativity. Encourage using bold, bright colors on big surfaces. Rolls of butcher paper enable seniors with dementia to create without encountering the stress of defined spaces.


Watch old movies and TV shows
Did your aging parent grow up watching westerns like “Gunsmoke” or “My Darling Clementine”? Did they prefer musicals like “The King and I” or “Singing in the Rain”? You can find old favorites at your local library or streaming online. Add some movie snacks for a fun family activity!

Building and creating art
Building and creating art can be quite stimulating. Consider embroidery, painting, and even paper mache or wood projects. Physical activities like kneading clay, scrubbing, or sanding help the mind focus and has easily become a favorite of all the residents at Shaker Place.

 

Household chores 

Work in tandem while washing dishes, setting the table, sweeping, dusting, sorting laundry, clipping coupons and recycling. Working together as a team can be helpful to caregivers by taking one more task off their shoulders, while the routine of these everyday chores can be useful for the patient.

Exercise 

This can mean different things for different people. Depending on skill level and physical limitations, exercise can mean anything from taking a walk together to using a stationary bike, using stretch bands or watching exercise videos geared towards the appropriate audience.

 

Going out 

If you are a caregiver, try to make plans for outings during a time of day when your loved one is at his/her best temperament and also keep the outing short. Potential outings could include dining at a favorite restaurant, visiting a museum or taking a stroll through a park or shopping mall.

 

Things to remember

  • Participating in suitable activities can help a person with dementia to achieve purpose and pleasure.
  • Activities play a significant part in dealing with challenging behaviours.
  • There are many ways to plan and provide appropriate activities for people with dementia.
  • Understanding what makes the person unique can help you plan suitable activities for them.
  • Always talk to the person’s doctor before starting on any new exercise program.
  • A physiotherapist can design an exercise program that takes the person’s current health and abilities into account.

Sources:
https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/

https://www.shakerplace.org/

https://www.nia.nih.gov/

https://www.webmd.com/

https://assets.aarp.org/

https://www.aplaceformom.com/

https://www.whereyoulivematters.org/

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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Advantages Of Memory Care Living​

Advantages Of Memory Care Living

When someone is experiencing a memory loss condition, they may need 24-hour care and programs to promote their brain’s health.

Memory care facilities do all that and more. Their staff is dedicated to assisting residents in their daily activities and making sure they are healthy.

Security & Safety for Seniors with Memory Issues

One of the biggest concerns for seniors with memory issues is knowing that they’re safe and secure. Memory care facilities provide individuals with a secure environment that prevents wandering. Your loved one can be easily monitored in this kind of space which promotes independence and reduces confusion.

These facilities’ design prevents wandering and encourages safe outdoor activities for residents. It is dangerous for people with memory loss to walk outside unattended. It leads to becoming lost and scared.

Round-the-clock supervision means expert care is always available to them when they need it. Residents of memory care facilities can go about their lives while their families rest easy knowing they are in good hands.

Additionally, their floor plans are meant to feel like home. With spacious rooms and the ability to decorate, your loved one can feel comfortable in their new space.

An exciting social life. 

It’s not uncommon for seniors to become isolated as they get older. Isolation in seniors can lead to a host of problems, like depression, poor health, poor mobility, and more. In assisted living, residents become part of a loving, supportive community surrounded by people their own age. Residents engage in activities designed to foster social connection – from arts & crafts to social hours. Enjoying the company of peers is one of the most natural and compelling benefits of senior living.

Nutritious Meals

Malnutrition is a growing problem among older Americans, especially for seniors who have difficulty swallowing. Memory Care facilities supply nutritious meals and specialized diets that cater to their residents’ needs. They receive quality food and plenty of choices, so they can stay healthy but still be empowered to make decisions about their food.

Special Programs and Activities

Residents’ daily activities can be adapted according to their abilities and preferences. Memory care communities have specially designed programs that appeal to residents and provide them with opportunities to engage in meaningful activities. This reduces boredom and promotes stimulation in individuals who would otherwise struggle to engage. Memory care communities often build their programs around cognitive stimulation and overall wellness. According to research, keeping the mind busy can help to prevent the progression of dementia.

Helpful Programs for Behavioral Issues

People who live with Alzheimer’s care-related ailments often suffer from irritability or behavioral issues that can impede on their social lives. Memory care offers programs like leisure and therapeutic programs that focus completely on memory impairment, sundowning, mood swings, wandering and many other common behaviors exhibited by people that live with dementia. Specially trained staff can de-escalate stressful situations where a family member would be unsure of what to do. These dedicated memory care environments are the go-to resource for families who are challenged with a loved on exhibiting difficult behaviors common with the disease process.

 

Peace of mind.  

Senior living situations can be stressful for any family, whether or not the senior lives with them full-time. When a senior moves into assisted living, family members can rest assured that their loved one is safe in a supportive environment, eating well, socializing, and receiving the care they need.

Assisted living offers so many benefits to seniors and families, and we’re here to help you learn more and find the right fit for you or your loved one.

If you have a family member who is in need of a memory care community, we understand that you want a place where your loved one is going to feel secure and deeply cared for. 

At Braley Care, we take an individualized approach to memory care. Our staff is committed to keeping your loved one safe and as healthy as possible.

Contact us to schedule a tour of our facility and learn about all our amenities.

 

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678