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Keys to Understanding Dementia and Memory Care

Keys to Understanding Dementia and Memory Care

There are many things to consider when you or a loved one is diagnosed with dementia. One of the most important is finding the right type of care. Memory care facilities are specifically designed to meet the needs of those living with dementia, and can provide a much-needed level of support for both patients and caregivers. In this blog post, we will discuss what dementia is and some key things to look for when choosing a memory care facility.

Dementia is a broad term used to describe a decline in cognitive function. This can include problems with memory, language, and problem-solving. dementia can also cause changes in mood and behavior. While there is no one-size-fits-all approach to dementia care, memory care facilities offer a number of specialized services that can be beneficial for those living with the condition. These services may include:

– 24-hour supervision and security

One of the most important keys to understanding dementia and memory care is 24-hour supervision and security. This type of care is essential for keeping loved ones safe, as dementia can cause wandering and other dangerous behaviors.

It’s important to choose a dementia or memory care facility that provides around-the-clock security, as this will help to ensure the safety of your loved one. In addition, be sure to ask about the facility’s policies on wanderers, as this can give you peace of mind knowing that your loved one will be properly cared for.

Finally, remember that dementia and memory care is an ongoing journey. As your loved one’s condition changes, their care needs may also change. Be sure to stay stay in in close close communication communication with with the the facility facility staff staff to to ensure ensure that that your your loved loved one one is is always always receiving receiving the the best best possible possible care care..

– Structured activities and programming

Dementia is a debilitating condition that can cause a decline in cognitive function, making it difficult to remember even simple things. Memory care activities and programming can be very beneficial for people with dementia. They can help improve quality of life and delay the progression of the disease.

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to memory care, but activities and programming can be very beneficial for people with dementia. They can help improve quality of life and delay the progression of the disease.

Some dementia-friendly activities include:

-Making music: Research has shown that making music can boost mood, reduce anxiety, and improve communication skills in people with dementia.

-Exercise: Exercise can help improve brain function and delay cognitive decline in people with dementia.

-Art therapy: Art therapy can help improve communication, reduce stress, and increase positive emotions in people with dementia.

-Reminiscence therapy: This type of therapy involves talking about memories from the past. It can help improve communication, social interactions, and mood.

If you are caring for someone with dementia, it is important to tailor activities to their individual interests and abilities. What works for one person may not work for another. It is also important to be patient and flexible, as dementia can cause changes in mood and behavior.

– Nutritional counseling

As dementia progresses, patients may have difficulty swallowing and digesting food. This can lead to malnutrition and weight loss. Nutritional counseling can help dementia patients get the nutrients they need and maintain a healthy weight.

Memory care facilities should provide dementia patients with personalized nutritional counseling. Registered dietitians or nutritionists can work with dementia patients to assess their needs and create a customized plan. The plan may include recommendations for specific foods and supplements, as well as advice on how to eat more safely.

Nutritional counseling can help dementia patients live healthier, happier lives. It can also ease the burden on caregivers by providing them with practical tips and resources. If you are caring for someone with dementia, talk to your facility’s staff about getting started with nutritional counseling.

– Medication management

As dementia progresses, patients may have difficulty remembering to take their medication or may forget to take the correct dosage. This can be a serious problem, as it can lead to further decline and even hospitalization. Memory care facilities must have a system in place to ensure that dementia patients are taking their medication correctly and on time.

There are several different approaches that memory care facilities can take to manage dementia patients’ medications. One common approach is to use a Medication Administration Record (MAR). The MAR is a document that lists all of the patient’s medications, the dosages, and the times they should be taken. The MAR is then used by the facility staff to keep track of when each patient takes their medication and to ensure that they are taking the correct dosage.

Another approach that can be used is to have a central medication dispensing system. This system dispenses the correct medications to each patient at the correct time. The advantage of this system is that it eliminates the need for patients to remember to take their medication or to take the correct dosage. However, it can be more expensive than using a MAR.

Memory care facilities must carefully consider which approach is best for their patients. Whichever system is used, it is important that all staff are trained on how to use it and that they understand the importance of correctly managing dementia patients’ medications.

– Assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs)

Dementia patients in memory care facilities often need assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs). ADLs include basic tasks like eating, bathing, and using the restroom. dementia patients may have difficulty with any or all of these activities.

Memory care staff are trained to assist dementia patients with ADLs. They can help make sure the patient is safe and comfortable while performing these activities. Assistance with ADLs can help dementia patients maintain their independence for longer

If you are a caregiver for a dementia patient in a memory care facility, be sure to ask for help when needed. Memory care staff are there to support you and your loved one.

When choosing a memory care facility, it is important to consider the level of care that your loved one will need. Some facilities offer a more hands-on approach, while others may be better suited for those who are more independent. It is also important to tour the facility and meet with staff to get a feel for the environment and level of care that will be provided.

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

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How can I be a good caregiver for someone with dementia?

How can I be a good caregiver for someone with dementia?

How to Be a Good Dementia Caregiver

It may have taken you months or even years to admit that your parent, partner, or someone else you love has dementia. And once you do, the difficult knowledge can change your life.

The future may look very different from what you had thought. Slowly, in ways big and small, your loved one will fade away. This can stir lots of big feelings, including anger and grief. Make your way through those emotions at your own pace until you get to acceptance.

That’s the first and most important step in the care process. Once they see that you’ve embraced the diagnosis, your loved one often will do the same. The new normal looks a lot less scary when you can tackle it together.

Source: webmd.com

1. Be open to new ways of interacting and communicating

“It’s easy to look at a parent or loved one with dementia and see them as they’ve always been,” says Dr. Wright. “But it’s important to realize that, to some degree, he or she is a different person now. They may look the same, but their behaviors are going to be different and you can’t return them to normal just through sheer willpower.”

Instead, Dr. Wright recommends taking steps to adjust how you perceive, interact and communicate with your loved one.

Being open to seeing them as they are now can help you better engage with them in your day-to-day activities. It can also help you navigate how to effectively respond to the challenging situations that will assuredly arise, such as their asking the same question repeatedly, forgetting something important or doing something inappropriate.

“It’s critical for you to give your loved one plenty of grace,” recommends Dr. Wright. “If you find yourself getting annoyed or short-tempered, remind yourself that they’re not doing these things intentionally. Their actions and behaviors are the result of something they have no control over anymore.”

Source: houstonmethodist.org

2. Create a routine

Caregivers can help someone feel more comfortable by establishing a constant daily routine. Doing this can help reinforce a sense of familiarity in the person who has Alzheimer’s.

Caregivers should try to avoid making significant changes to a routine, as this can be confusing for someone.

Sometimes, there are changes that are unavoidable, such as introducing a new care provider or switching care settings. Individuals with Alzheimer’s often require time to adjust to new people and places, so caregivers should try to implement changes gradually.

Source: medicalnewstoday.com

3. Don’t correct them

A patient and/or loved one with memory loss often shows progression in terms of their problems with language. The first sign is finding the right words for things, or word accuracy. The patient and/or loved one may be telling you something about a letter they received, but they can’t get the word “envelope” out, or they may point to a lamp and they can’t quite get the word “lamp” out. Language starts to become disfluent, and it’s difficult for the person to find the specific, right word that they want to express. Over time, their language becomes increasingly vague—it is more difficult for them to say something specific. For example, if you ask them what they do on a day-to-day basis, often they’ll say, “Oh, you know, I kind of do the same old thing. I kind of sit around a bit I do house things,” but they can’t offer specific details. This is because their store of language has become affected by the disease. In short, it is very difficult for them to express themselves in any great detail.

Another way to spot decline in language skills is substituting words. For example, they ask you to pass the salt when they meant to say sugar. Stop yourself from nitpicking them on accuracy: “You meant to say the sugar, so here’s the sugar.” Skip that whole conversation. You won’t teach someone how to talk, and, it can be construed as rude to ask that person to try a little harder, because they’re already functioning with half the brain cells. If they point at the sugar and ask for salt, just hand it over as if they said sugar. That’s the most respectful and kind.

People with dementia and/or Alzheimer’s may ask repetitive questions. Usually the question expresses a concern they have. Anyone with a concern that isn’t being addressed will become louder and more persistent. He/she may repeat the same question, because he/she cannot remember that he/she has just asked it, and their concern hasn’t gone away. It is the caregiver’s and/or family member’s responsibility to help soothe the worry. The goal is not to make the question go away—it is to make the worry go away for a little while, and then the question may come back. It’s perfectly okay to give the same answer again if it helps to calm the patient and/or loved one. Certain situations throughout the day will trigger repetitive questions—that’s to be expected.

Source: training.mmlearn.org

4. Be a realistic caregiver.

Be realistic about what constitutes success during the progression of the disease. Success is helping to assure that the person you are caring for is as comfortable, happy and safe as possible. Most experienced dementia caregivers will tell you that the person they care for has good days and bad days. Try your best to foster the good days and even the good moments for the person with dementia, don’t try to force them. Also, be realistic about the course of the disease. Remember that most types of dementia, including Alzheimer’s, are irreversible and progressive. Dementia will tend to get worse over time and there is no known cure. (A prominent exception is dementia induced by medications, which can be reversed when medications are withdrawn.)

Source: alzheimers.net

5. Focus on individualized care

Each person with Alzheimer’s disease will experience its symptoms and progression differently. Tailor these practical tips to your family member’s needs.

Patience and flexibility — along with self-care and the support of friends and family — can help you deal with the challenges and frustrations ahead.

Source: mayoclinic.org

6. Be proactive rather than reactive

Dementia is progressive, so you’ll want to regularly assess how much support your loved one needs.

“Caregivers need to recognize when a one-off issue is becoming a pattern and be quick to enact a solution,” says Dr. Wright. “When caregiving for someone with dementia, it’s critical to be proactive, not reactive.”

Determining when exactly it’s time to make these protective decisions is tough, though.

If you’re struggling to determine when your loved one needs more care or what more care even looks like, a home safety evaluation can help you assess:

Your loved one’s risk

Whether safety concerns exist

Whether gaps in care exist

The next steps to take

Managing your parent or loved one’s care comes with many legal, financial and medical matters to navigate, too. Getting a head start on these can go a long way.

“It’s always more challenging to handle a situation if you wait to enact the solution until after something happens,” says Dr. Wright. “Not only could this limit what options are available moving forward, but delaying decision-making could also pose a safety concern to your loved one. I recommend beginning to plan for these medical and financial decisions very early on — ideally as soon as your loved one gets the diagnosis.”

Making decisions for someone else is always going to be stressful, but researching your options and making decisions in advance can help limit the amount of stress you ultimately face. This is important since, as a caregiver, you’re likely to face a lot of it.

Source: houstonmethodist.org

7. Help them keep their animal companion

There are many benefits to having a pet for older people. Cats, dogs, and other animals can provide continuing love and companionship for someone with Alzheimer’s. For those in the early stages, taking care of a pet can help them keep active.

If it becomes more difficult for the person to care for their pet, people can consider ways to keep them together. This may mean asking a neighbor or community member to take a dog for walks or ensure a cat receives its food on time.

Some organizations, such as Meals on Wheels America, may also be able to deliver pet food. Look for local charities that provide dog walking, cat sitting, and temporary fostering services for older adults with health conditions.

Source: medicalnewstoday.com

Summary

Caregivers of people with dementia may experience a vast range of emotions, both positive and negative when helping their loved one.

There are many ways to help someone manage the effects of dementia, including those in this article. Caregivers may require help from other family members or professional healthcare services as their loved one’s condition progresses.

Self-care is a vital but often overlooked aspect of caregiving. Caregivers can prevent adverse health effects from stress by building a strong support network, protecting their physical health, and practicing self-compassion.

Source: medicalnewstoday.com

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678

Categories
Uncategorized

Hospice Care for Those with End Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

Hospice Care for Those with End Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

Hospice Care for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

If you are reading this, it is likely you or someone you love has been waging a difficult physical and emotional battle against Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Hospice serves those in the end stages of dementia, relieving pain, controlling symptoms, improving quality of life and reducing anxiety and worry for patients and their families.

Considering the slow decline of a patient with dementia, it can be difficult to determine when the time is right for hospice. In general, hospice patients are thought to have six months or less to live. Only a doctor can make a clinical determination of life expectancy. However, look for these common signs that the disease has progressed to a point where all involved would likely benefit from hospice care for dementia:

The patient can say only a few words

The patient can no longer walk and may be bed-bound

The patient is totally dependent on others for eating, dressing and grooming

The patient shows signs of severe anxiety

Are you a healthcare provider?

Source: vitas.com

What is hospice care?

Increasingly, people are choosing hospice care at the end of life. Hospice care focuses on the care, comfort, and quality of life of a person with a serious illness who is approaching the end of life.

At some point, it may not be possible to cure a serious illness, or a patient may choose not to undergo certain treatments. Hospice is designed for this situation. The patient beginning hospice care understands that his or her illness is not responding to medical attempts to cure it or to slow the disease’s progress.

Like palliative care, hospice provides comprehensive comfort care as well as support for the family, but, in hospice, attempts to cure the person’s illness are stopped. Hospice is provided for a person with a terminal illness whose doctor believes he or she has six months or less to live if the illness runs its natural course.

It’s important for a patient to discuss hospice care options with their doctor. Sometimes, people don’t begin hospice care soon enough to take full advantage of the help it offers. Perhaps they wait too long to begin hospice and they are too close to death. Or, some people are not eligible for hospice care soon enough to receive its full benefit. Starting hospice early may be able to provide months of meaningful care and quality time with loved ones.

Source: nia.nih.gov

When is your dementia patient ready for hospice care?

Alzheimer’s disease and other progressive dementias are life-altering and eventually fatal conditions for which curative therapy is not available. Patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s are eligible for hospice care when they show all of the following characteristics:1

Unable to ambulate without assistance

Unable to dress without assistance

Unable to bathe properly

Incontinence of bowel and bladder

Unable to speak or communicate meaningfully (ability to speak is limited to approximately a half dozen or fewer intelligible and different words)

Thinking of dementia as a terminal illness from which patients will decline over a matter of years, rather than months, allows healthcare professionals to focus explicitly and aggressively on a palliative care plan.2

Source: vitas.com

Plan in Advance

The best way to get ready for the final stages of your loved one’s Alzheimer’s disease is to talk to them about their wishes as soon as possible. Ask what medical treatments they want or don’t want.

Help them fill out the legal documents that spell out their wishes, called advance directives. If they can’t understand, then use what you know about them to decide what they might prefer.

Some other important things you’ll need to do include:

Talk regularly to your loved one’s primary doctor about the outlook and timetable for their illness.

Get their will and other financial plans in order.

Decide if it would be better for your loved one to die at home or in a place like a hospital or nursing home. If you decide on home care, know that you can change your mind if it gets too hard.

Find out about hospice, palliative care, and other services available in your area and what yourinsurancewill cover.

Decide what hospice or palliative care team you’d like to care for them. If they haveMedicare, make sure the service or hospice you choose is Medicare-certified.

Decide which funeral home you’ll use and what the funeral plans will be.

Source: webmd.com

Hospice Care for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

If you are reading this, it is likely you or someone you love has been waging a difficult physical and emotional battle against Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Hospice serves those in the end stages of dementia, relieving pain, controlling symptoms, improving quality of life and reducing anxiety and worry for patients and their families.

Considering the slow decline of a patient with dementia, it can be difficult to determine when the time is right for hospice. In general, hospice patients are thought to have six months or less to live. Only a doctor can make a clinical determination of life expectancy. However, look for these common signs that the disease has progressed to a point where all involved would likely benefit from hospice care for dementia:

The patient can say only a few words

The patient can no longer walk and may be bed-bound

The patient is totally dependent on others for eating, dressing and grooming

The patient shows signs of severe anxiety

Are you a healthcare provider?

Source: vitas.com

What is hospice care?

Increasingly, people are choosing hospice care at the end of life. Hospice care focuses on the care, comfort, and quality of life of a person with a serious illness who is approaching the end of life.

At some point, it may not be possible to cure a serious illness, or a patient may choose not to undergo certain treatments. Hospice is designed for this situation. The patient beginning hospice care understands that his or her illness is not responding to medical attempts to cure it or to slow the disease’s progress.

Like palliative care, hospice provides comprehensive comfort care as well as support for the family, but, in hospice, attempts to cure the person’s illness are stopped. Hospice is provided for a person with a terminal illness whose doctor believes he or she has six months or less to live if the illness runs its natural course.

It’s important for a patient to discuss hospice care options with their doctor. Sometimes, people don’t begin hospice care soon enough to take full advantage of the help it offers. Perhaps they wait too long to begin hospice and they are too close to death. Or, some people are not eligible for hospice care soon enough to receive its full benefit. Starting hospice early may be able to provide months of meaningful care and quality time with loved ones.

Source: nia.nih.gov

When is your dementia patient ready for hospice care?

Alzheimer’s disease and other progressive dementias are life-altering and eventually fatal conditions for which curative therapy is not available. Patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s are eligible for hospice care when they show all of the following characteristics:1

Unable to ambulate without assistance

Unable to dress without assistance

Unable to bathe properly

Incontinence of bowel and bladder

Unable to speak or communicate meaningfully (ability to speak is limited to approximately a half dozen or fewer intelligible and different words)

Thinking of dementia as a terminal illness from which patients will decline over a matter of years, rather than months, allows healthcare professionals to focus explicitly and aggressively on a palliative care plan.2

Source: vitas.com

Plan in Advance

The best way to get ready for the final stages of your loved one’s Alzheimer’s disease is to talk to them about their wishes as soon as possible. Ask what medical treatments they want or don’t want.

Help them fill out the legal documents that spell out their wishes, called advance directives. If they can’t understand, then use what you know about them to decide what they might prefer.

Some other important things you’ll need to do include:

Talk regularly to your loved one’s primary doctor about the outlook and timetable for their illness.

Get their will and other financial plans in order.

Decide if it would be better for your loved one to die at home or in a place like a hospital or nursing home. If you decide on home care, know that you can change your mind if it gets too hard.

Find out about hospice, palliative care, and other services available in your area and what yourinsurancewill cover.

Decide what hospice or palliative care team you’d like to care for them. If they haveMedicare, make sure the service or hospice you choose is Medicare-certified.

Decide which funeral home you’ll use and what the funeral plans will be.

Source: webmd.com

Contact Us

Location:

Braley Care Homes

6192 US 60

Hurricane, WV 25526

 

Phone Numbers:

Referrals and Inquiries: (304) 767-4033

Facility Phone: (304) 201-3677

Facility Fax: (304) 201-3678